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Flooding the Landscape: The Site C Dam on B.C.’s Peace River

This article is brought to you by the International League of Conservation Photographers (iLCP). Read our other articles on the National Geographic News Watch blog featuring the work of our iLCP Fellow Photographers all around the world. Text and Photos by iLCP Fellow Garth Lenz. As the small Piper Super Cub climbs, this beautiful valley spreads out below…

The World Is Still Enormous

The world is still enormous, but imperiled. Like traditional navigators, we must see beyond our immediate surroundings to forge a better future.

Beijing and the Bicycle

The great bicycle rush every day in Beijing is iconic and recognized all over the world, yet bicycle culture is slowly being run over by rising car ownership, literally and metaphorically.

Voyaging Reflection: Sources of Strength

Daniel Lin—Hōkūle’a crewmember, explorer, and photographer—reflects on one of the most important lessons he has learned while sailing on the Worldwide Voyage.

Two Traditional Languages Evade Extinction With the Internet

The Enduring Voices Project helps save two traditional languages from being erased with the power of the internet.

September 21, 2014: Living At Sea for 3 Years, Uncovering The Largest Ever Carnivore and More

This week on National Geographic Weekend radio, join host Boyd Matson and his guests as they live on the world’s oceans for three years, create the largest marine protected area, road trip down a historical highway, protect power grids from hackers, eat our way through Rome, find the world’s meanest dinosaur ever, tear down dams, spy on cats, and teach our kids to be wild again.

You Cannot Save the Climate Without Trees

The People’s Climate March that trumpeted its way through the streets of Manhattan yesterday was led by communities on the front lines of climate change—and Indigenous Peoples were at the forefront of this group.  The tropical forests where they live are not only getting hammered by changing weather patterns, drug traffickers, invasive pests, and massive…

Ask Your Weird Animal Questions: Why Do Lobsters Turn Red When Cooked?

Are wood roaches different than cockroaches? Do killer whales usually attack in groups? See this week’s Ask Your Weird Animal Questions.

The Coral Triangle: Amazon of the Oceans

This article is brought to you by the International League of Conservation Photographers (iLCP). Read our other articles on the National Geographic News Watch blog featuring the work of our iLCP Fellow Photographers all around the world. Text and photos by iLCP Fellow James Morgan. I’ve been fortunate to see most of the world’s oceans the past couple…

When I Grow Up: A Day With Our Next-Generation Monks

Lost in the adventures of the mountainous terrain in Laos, we are guided by an unexpected group of new friends with a unique, traditional upbringing.

Top 25 Wild Bird Photographs of the Week #72

Firethroats, kingfishers, openbills, nightjars, stilts, leafbirds, roadrunners, mangos, laughthrushes, and rubythroats are featured in this 72nd edition of the “Top 25 Wild Bird Photographs of the Week”! With almost 600,000 followers on the Wild Bird Trust Facebook page, the Wild Bird Revolution is accelerating towards our goal of 1 million Wild Bird Enthusiasts by the end…

Transforming Indonesia’s Manta Fisheries

This article is brought to you by the International League of Conservation Photographers (iLCP). Read our other articles on the National Geographic News Watch blog featuring the work of our iLCP Fellow Photographers all around the world. Text and photos by iLCP Fellow Shawn Heinrichs Transforming Indonesia’s Manta Fisheries: The path to creating an effective Manta Sanctuary Indonesia announced…

Crowdsourcing Subtitles for Endangered Languages

Viki, the crowdsourced subtitling website, teams with the Living Tongues Institute to give endangered languages new life and attractiveness for new generations.

September 14, 2014: Wiring an African Wilderness, Starting a Garbage-Fueled Country and More

This week on National Geographic Weekend radio, join host Boyd Matson and his guests as they discover a well-dressed Italian mummy, proclaim a nation devoted to garbage, find the perfect island, find new ways to survive cancer, explore the Okavango Delta for science, relate to a solitary blue whale, celebrate the Wilderness Act, and create a canine soup.

Hōkūleʻa: Enjoying a Day Off

Getting days off is a rarity on the Worldwide Voyage. When we get the opportunity to plan an excursion, we try to make the most of it! This was how some crew members spent our day off after the UN Conference in Samoa.