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Category archives for Cultures

They Aren’t Always Smiling: Skin Lesions and Deformities Plague Wild Dolphins

Dolphins are top predators, meaning they feed at the top of the food chain. When chemical pollutants settle into seafloor sediments, they are absorbed by a variety of small organisms. Some of these creatures end up in the stomachs of bottom feeders, which, in turn, accumulate higher concentrations of the same contaminants in their body…

The Ese’Eja: From a Cotton Thread in the Sky to Protectors of the Amazon

The Ese’Eja of the Madre de Dios Amazon region in Peru received a Genographic Project Legacy Fund grant to help preserve their culture, stories and language. As outside pressures mount and the battle with the Peruvian government over resources continues, Ese’Eja President Carlos Dejaviso Poje asks: Will our culture be here tomorrow?

A Healer’s Meridian: Where Eastern and Western Healing Intersect

When the conveniences of Western healthcare are removed, how do you treat an illness? “A Healer’s Meridian” explores the power of healing in Laos, where Eastern traditions intersect with Western treatment.

New Golden Bat Adds to Animals With the Midas Touch

A golden bat recently discovered in Bolivia has joined the ranks of nature’s richly gilded creatures.

5 Countries Putting All Their Money on Species

Nations throughout Africa have The Big Five (the little five too), Australia has Koalas and Kangaroos, the United States has the Bald Eagle, and Canada has the noble Beaver. Every corner of the world has its species that help to define cultures, geographies, and national identity. However, these five nations have taken their pride in…

A Retrofuturistic Train Journey to Explore America’s New Frontiers

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Tomorrow, a group of 25 millennial pioneers will embark on a retrofuturistic, crowdfunded train journey across America known as the Millennial Trains Project. Along the way, they will meet with local innovators, grow as leaders, and build trans-regional perspectives relating to their personal, professional, and creative interests. Instead of buying souvenirs, they will use 3D…

Scenes From Mongolia’s Changing Steppe

National Geographic Grantee Hannah Reyes is a photojournalist curious about cultures in transition—how old traditions are surviving, what remains under broader social pressure, and the new forms emerging through the fusion, interaction and conflict of cultures. Mongolian herders are one such culture.

August 3, 2014 Radio Show: Paragliding at 18,000 Feet Above the Earth, Swimming 213 Feet Below the Ocean Without Air And More

This week on National Geographic Weekend, join host Boyd Matson and his guests as they dive 207 feet under the ocean by holding our breath, fight off an aggressive cheetah in Tanzania, measure our feet to find out why a foot is a foot long, use spark plugs as currency in Cuba, travel by parachute for 40 miles at 16,000 feet, spy on polar bears in Norway, colonize the Arctic with North America’s earliest European visitors, and get taken hostage by rebels in a Himalayan valley.

Hōkūle’a: French Polynesia’s Gift to the World

As the crews for the second leg of the Worldwide Voyage (WWV) make their way across the South Pacific, they have connected with numerous island communities in French Polynesia. These communities have embraced the mission of the voyage and took it upon themselves to contribute to the message of Mālama Honua in a way that none of the crew members could have expected.

So You Want to Backup Your Aerial Footage Taken from Drones?

This post is the latest in the series Dreams of the World, which profiles interesting people Kike meets during his travels. Drones and Small Unmanned Aerial Systems Special Series. Those of us who are flying small unmanned aerial vehicles, whether for work or for fun, have started producing thousands of megabytes of information. It is a scary thought that your unique…

Unexpected Conservation Connection Between Montana, Azerbaijan and the United Arab Emirates

My wife Kayla and I, after decades of living in Montana, made a rookie mistake last month as we tried, on a week’s notice, to secure a three-night spot at one of our favorite camping areas. We figured the second week of July would be a perfect time for relaxing and wildlife watching. Apparently so…

Inside Europe’s Mystical Sufi Lodges, Part V: Connecting the Dots

In Macedonia, the Bektashis face many challenges, but they fight to keep their doors open to those who are willing to share ideas and hospitality. National Geographic Young Explorers Grantee Mehves Lelic reports directly from a conference organized by the Bektashis and which invites other religious orders.

Your Favorite Species

For three years I taught Animal Biology labs to undergraduate students at George Mason University. Extra credit assignments were not permitted, so I liked to build in a few intermittent low-ball quiz questions to provide some levity to an otherwise strict and challenging syllabus. My favorite question to ask was “what is your favorite species?”…

Ask Your Weird Animal Questions: “Stiletto” Snakes, Cat Purrs

Why does your cat purr? What’s a stiletto snake? Check out this week’s Ask Your Weird Animal Questions.

Zaña, Peru: The Town That Almost Was

Sarah Kennedy is using animal remains to dig through Peru’s colonial past. The town of Zaña, where she is staying, has seen better days, and few truly realize the immensity of its past.