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Governor’s Institutes of VT and NKAF Team Up to Deliver Astrophotography to Vermont Teens

The Northeast Kingdom Astronomy Foundation (NKAF) was honored to teach at a Governor’s Institutes of Vermont Winter Weekend in February at Goddard College.  The astrophotography immersion weekend helped GIV reach its goal of delivering in-depth STEM training to young people from high schools throughout Vermont, and it included a trip to Northern Skies Observatory (NSO)…

Everything is Connected | Chapter 2: Enchanted Echachist

Like other indigenous First Nation communities throughout Canada, the Tla-o-qui-aht people are survivors. Over a century of cultural genocide, Christianisation, forced assimilation, land alienation and re-settlement reduced their numbers tenfold and pushed them to the brink of extinction. But despite environmental, social and cultural upheavals, the Tla-o-qui-aht are slowly but surely strengthening their ability to cope…

The Greater London National Park* Opens

“There is this idea that a National Park has to be remote and rural, but cities are incredibly important habitats too.” Daniel Raven-Ellison describes his project to change the way people look at cities.

March 30, 2014: Skiing Everest, Search for Michael Rockefeller, Violent Animal Reproduction, and More

Join radio host Boyd Matson every week for adventure, conservation and green science. This week his guests try to solve the mystery of the disappearance of Michael Rockefeller, figure out if Mother Nature is really trying to kill you, ski off the seven summits including Everest, look inside the city of Damascus during the Syrian War, dive into Mission Blue with Sylvia Earle, look at how much food we waste each year, take a walk on the surface of Mars, and find out what we should pack on a camping trip.

Equality for Women and Sustainable Development Go Hand in Hand

Half of the world’s farmers are women, but women only own about one percent of the world’s land. Similarly, women make up nearly 50 percent of the global fisheries workforce, but in most countries have little to no say in how fisheries are managed. These statistics are indicative of a more general trend: women’s interests and roles are seldom seriously considered in the design and implementation of rural development and conservation initiatives.

How Much for a Picture With the Monkey? The Real Cost Of Wildlife Tourism

I’ve been extremely fortunate to have spent the past seven months working and traveling in Southeast Asia with support from the National Geographic Society and the U.S. Fulbright program. While my research has brought me to Singapore and Gibraltar a number of times, I had not previously stayed long enough in either place to explore…

Everything is Connected | Chapter 1: Survivors

Like other indigenous First Nation communities throughout Canada, the Tla-o-qui-aht people are survivors. Over a century of cultural genocide, Christianisation, forced assimilation, land alienation and re-settlement reduced their numbers tenfold and pushed them to the brink of extinction. But despite environmental, social and cultural upheavals, the Tla-o-qui-aht are finding creative holistic solutions and restoring their…

Spoiler Alert: You Can’t Really Stay at the Real Grand Budapest Hotel (But We Can Tell You Everything About It)

Peeling back the wallpaper on Wes Anderson’s sets and locations. Wes Anderson’s latest movie, The Grand Budapest Hotel, is a fictional murder-mystery-adventure-love story set in a sumptuous pink Eastern European hotel on the eve of World War II. Unfortunately for moviegoers who’d like to visit, the Grand Budapest Hotel doesn’t actually exist. It’s a miniature…

Your Weird Animal Questions Answered: Is a Sloth a Good Pet?

Why do dogs chase certain vehicles? Do otters or sloths make good pets? This week we answer your questions about critters closest to home—pets.

Walk and Roll in Amish Country

Paintings, photos, and thoughtful words bring to life the journey of a group of undergraduates walking (or wheel-chair rolling) across Indiana with NG Explorer John Francis, the Planetwalker.

Hands-on STEM Learning: Northern Skies Observatory

A seventh grader sitting at the computer control desk at an observatory in a small Vermont town comments to her fellow student: “I can’t believe I am in charge of this telescope!” The 17-inch PlaneWave reflecting telescope, complete with its supporting state-of-the-art equipment and robotic software, was displaying images of a galaxy 2.3 million light-years…

March 24, 2014: Big Wave Crashes, Haitian Folk-Tunes, Babysitting Gorillas and More

Join radio host Boyd Matson every week for adventure, conservation and green science. This week they are held underwater until they blackout and are rescued, put Langston Hughes’ poetry to music, study bats in the living room, grow up with gorillas, survive a deadly Antarctic expedition, remind travelers to represent their nations, refuse to order bluefin tuna sushi, and create stronger laws to protect elephants.

Your Weird Animal Questions Answered: Biggest Great White Shark

In our weekly column, we tell you how spiders walk on water, how many teeth alligators have, and more.

US/Mexico Border Stories Through Kids’ Eyes

National Geographic Emerging Explorer Jason de León is on a mission: Take 30 kids from the Arivaca community in southern Arizona and team them up with National Geographic photographers to tell the story of life on the US/Mexico border.

Youth Radio’s Lipstick Diaries: The Ugly Side of Beauty

By Joi Morgan One thing I know for sure, my friends and I count on the perfect lip gloss to set off our looks—whether we’re heading to class or a night out. Right now I’m totally into bubblegum pink. But I was surprised to learn what’s in these tubes! Teenage girls spend nearly $14 a…