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Category archives for Biocultural Diversity

Genetically Modified or Organic Farming: Which Will Sustain a Growing Nation?

In the newly formed state of Telangana, India, the high-tech science of genetic modification is mediated by a 6,000 year old farming tradition. PhD candidate Andrew Flachs explores how new technologies are changing farmer lives (and how farmers are adapting new technologies to suit their needs).

September 1, 2013: Speed Hiking From Mexico to Canada, Coming Face to Face With a Grizzly and More

This week, we set a speed record walking from Mexico to Canada, pack bear spray in the event that we encounter a bear, dog or family member who gets out of line, and cycle across the United States in just 42 days.

Top 25 Photographs from the Wilderness #15

We are rediscovering that only through sharing will we save this magnificent planet. Social media gives us the ability to share photographs, thoughts, ideas, and knowledge almost instantaneously with powerful effects. A great example of this is National Geographic’s “The Great Nature Project”. This is a worldwide celebration of our diverse planet through photographs submitted by people around the…

Dreams of the World: Buddhist Monk from Angkor (Cambodia)

 This post is the latest in Kike Calvo´s series Dreams of the World, which profiles interesting people we meet during our travels. “I was young the last time I was here. It was, perhaps, 45 years ago” Buddhist monk Tak Tak, 60, said gently as he contemplated the silent magnificence of early morning Ta Prohm temple…

Where Brazilians Love to Shop (Hint: Not in Brazil)

Anyone who’s ever gone on vacation in a country with cheap prices has heard some variation of the following advice: go with your suitcases empty. Buy everything there and then bring it all back. Favorable exchange rates and developing economies can make everything cheap, much cheaper than you’d find back home.

But there’s a strange way it’s playing out in Brazil. Rather than heading to Cambodia, China, or Bangladesh where many low-cost consumer goods are made, young Brazilians are heading to the United States.

Celebrating the Ingenious Skills of Tribes

From the hunting peoples of Canada to the hunter-gatherers of Africa, tribal peoples have found ingenious ways of surviving over thousands of years. For many tribal peoples, continuous immersion in nature over thousands of years has resulted in a profound attunement to the subtle cues of the natural world. Acute observations have taught tribes how…

August 4, 2013: Running 135 miles through Death Valley, Swimming with Navy Seals, and More

This week, we run 135-miles and gain 8,642 feet in altitude in a race through Death Valley, then we set a North American paragliding record, soaring 240 miles over eight hours, and finally, we meet a former Navy seal, living out her days eating fish and swimming for tourists at the Smithsonian National Zoo.

Turkish Town Has Hosted 12,000 Years of Human History & Stunning Biodiversity

Almost nowhere in the world is human history as densely layered as it is in Hasankeyf. Strange sights greet its visitors: thousands of caves carved into limestone cliffs, children playing on the remains of a gargantuan medieval bridge, the towering minaret of a 15th-century mosque. Explore the ancient Turkish town with NG Young Explorer Julia Harte and team member Anna Ozbek.

Indigenous Cultures Team Up to Apply Ancient Wisdom to Today’s World

The “ancient world” isn’t gone. It’s a vital part of our world today, and it could hold answers to some of our most pressing challenges.

July 28, 2013: Riding Horseback From Canada To Brazil, Walking Silently For 17 Years, and More

This week, we ride from Calgary to Brazil, relying on the kindness of strangers, then we forego motorized vehicles for 22 years while maintaining a vow of silence, and finally, we get some hiking tips from the best hiker in the world.

Top 25 Wild Bird Photographs of the Week #46

Every week we are amazed by the ingenuity and passion required to capture the thousands of amazing wild bird photographs submitted by hundreds of photographers as pat of the Wild Bird Revolution. This is one of the most colorful and magical collections of wild bird photographs ever compiled. The photographers responsible for these stunning photographs…

A Tale of Water Lilies, Hippos and Explorers…

Boyd Matson, presenter of National Geographic Weekend, and I discussed how we survive the hippos and crocodiles, what we eat, and how we actually cross the Okavango Delta each year. We focussed on the use of water lily rhizomes (often called “water lily bulbs”) and the seeds from the water lily flowers as an important…

Top 25 Photographs from the Wilderness #13

Explore the wilderness with us… Rhinos are in terrible trouble across Africa. The Kruger National Park, the second oldest protected area on earth, may lose as many as 1,000 rhinos this year! The South African government has reacted by supporting the legal sale of over $100 million of rhino horn. This decision has polarized the…

Guests Across The Globe: Six Months of 2013 NG Weekend Interviews

We’re halfway through the year and what better way to map our progress than to, well, map the many guests we’ve had on National Geographic Weekend since the ball dropped back in January?

Ancient Traditions, Modern Celebration

Modern practitioners of the ancient healing ceremonies of the Kallawaya people of South America offer blessings for the United States on the Fourth of July at the Smithsonian Folklife Festival in Washington D.C.