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Category archives for Biocultural Diversity

Best Photographs: 2013 Okavango Expedition

Every year the Percy FitzPatrick Institute and Wild Bird Trust undertake the Okavango Wetland Bird Survey. This is a nine-year project that aims to use 71 wetland bird species as indicators of significant change in the flood regime and functioning of the Okavango Delta. The survey involves “poling” ourselves over 250 miles across this enigmatic…

Most Wild-Caught Grey Parrots Die Before Market

Researchers in the field estimate that 45-65% of wild-caught African grey parrots (Psittacus erithacus erithacus) die before arrival at markets and quarantine facilities in Kinshasa, capital of the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC). Terese Hart, Director of the TL2 Project (www.bonoboincongo.com), clarifies that trappers lose an average of 25%, local buyers declare a 10-40% mortality rate, and air transport to…

Top 25 Wild Bird Photographs of the Week #48

Cuckoos, woodstars, plumeleteers, skimmers, weavers, bee-eaters, grenadiers, laughingthrushes and ground rollers… The wild birds of the world will never cease to astound and amaze. Their natural habitat, however, is disappearing rapidly and most populations are under threat or, at least, in decline. Anyone can walk out their front door and the greener and wetter your surroundings become, the…

What’s a Danajon Bank?

by Michael Ready, Associate Fellow at the International League of Conservation Photographers In April 2013, after four planes, a ferry, and two outriggers, I arrived at Handumon, a remote village and field station on Jandayan Island in the Philippines. As I lay down the first night under a mosquito net, wiped out and bit disoriented,…

Dreams of the World: Newlyweds, from China to Central Park.

This post is the latest in the series Dreams of the World, which profiles interesting people Kike meets during his travels.   Lei and Ming just got married. They both love traveling. Ming, 27, dreams of traveling around the world to see different scenery and meet different people. ¨ I want to become someone who can…

Stalking the Wild Tomato: The Ethnobotany of Genetically Modified Crops

In a place where population growth is moving incredibly fast, added pressure on farmers in India in the wake of crushing debt and failed crops calls for a new agricultural approach. Genetic modification and organic farming present promising solutions. Young Explorer Andrew Flachs will investigate the effect of both growing strategies by interviewing farmers in Southern…

The Great Nature Project features the Florida Wildlife Corridor

I am pleased to share my Florida Wildlife Corridor photography collection as part of the new Great Nature Project by National Geographic. To raise awareness for the Florida Wildlife Corridor, we’ve also created a custom group within the Great Nature Project. Check out the Florida Wildlife Corridor Group to learn how you can post your own photographs to…

Former Yugoslav Barrack Gets New Life as an Art Space and Anarchist Squat

National Geographic grantee Riley Arthur is documenting the ‘Erased of Slovenia’ – 200,000 non-ethnic Slovenian residents who were not automatically granted citizenship after the country split from Yugoslavia in 1991. Her journey led her to an artist colony where she began her search for this community.

REDD+ Can Be a Game-Changer in the Battle Against Tropical Deforestation

In a high profile side event to the UN General Assembly next week, UN agencies, NGOs and the private sector will gather at the Wildlife Conservation Society’s Bronx Zoo to celebrate recent successes in forest protection to combat climate change and call for much greater future investment.

Genetically Modified or Organic Farming: Which Will Sustain a Growing Nation?

In the newly formed state of Telangana, India, the high-tech science of genetic modification is mediated by a 6,000 year old farming tradition. PhD candidate Andrew Flachs explores how new technologies are changing farmer lives (and how farmers are adapting new technologies to suit their needs).

September 1, 2013: Speed Hiking From Mexico to Canada, Coming Face to Face With a Grizzly and More

This week, we set a speed record walking from Mexico to Canada, pack bear spray in the event that we encounter a bear, dog or family member who gets out of line, and cycle across the United States in just 42 days.

Top 25 Photographs from the Wilderness #15

We are rediscovering that only through sharing will we save this magnificent planet. Social media gives us the ability to share photographs, thoughts, ideas, and knowledge almost instantaneously with powerful effects. A great example of this is National Geographic’s “The Great Nature Project”. This is a worldwide celebration of our diverse planet through photographs submitted by people around the…

Dreams of the World: Buddhist Monk from Angkor (Cambodia)

 This post is the latest in Kike Calvo´s series Dreams of the World, which profiles interesting people we meet during our travels. “I was young the last time I was here. It was, perhaps, 45 years ago” Buddhist monk Tak Tak, 60, said gently as he contemplated the silent magnificence of early morning Ta Prohm temple…

Where Brazilians Love to Shop (Hint: Not in Brazil)

Anyone who’s ever gone on vacation in a country with cheap prices has heard some variation of the following advice: go with your suitcases empty. Buy everything there and then bring it all back. Favorable exchange rates and developing economies can make everything cheap, much cheaper than you’d find back home.

But there’s a strange way it’s playing out in Brazil. Rather than heading to Cambodia, China, or Bangladesh where many low-cost consumer goods are made, young Brazilians are heading to the United States.

Celebrating the Ingenious Skills of Tribes

From the hunting peoples of Canada to the hunter-gatherers of Africa, tribal peoples have found ingenious ways of surviving over thousands of years. For many tribal peoples, continuous immersion in nature over thousands of years has resulted in a profound attunement to the subtle cues of the natural world. Acute observations have taught tribes how…