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Category archives for Cultures

Teen Pharmacist: An Unregulated Distribution of Drugs

After several injuries from a motorcycle accident, Sadia Ali ventures to a remote pharmacy to get medication. Her experience is an outstanding illustration of the pharmaceutical conditions in Laos.

My Fihavanana Malagasy: At Home on the Eighth Continent

Cara Brook is a disease ecologist from the Andrew Dobson Lab at Princeton, studying diseases that can leap from bats to humans. In the course of her work, she has earned a Malagasy family, which sparks her curiosity for the origins of humanity on Madagascar.

La Florida: Treasures of the Ancients Under Our Feet

Under the town of La Florida in Guatemala, an ancient Mayan city sleeps—never before mapped or explored. Untold historical treasures could still lurk under the feet of modern-day inhabitants.

August 24, 2014: How to Survive a Deadly Avalanche, Remembering Fallen War Reporters in Song and More

This week on National Geographic Weekend, join host Boyd Matson and his guests as they survive an avalanche while skiing in Washington, save the environment while winning the Stanley Cup, uncover the tombs of powerful women in the Andes, pay tribute to a pair of fallen war correspondents, sleep on a stranger’s couch, herd reindeer in the Russian arctic, and hold the jaws of crocodiles while we test just how hard they can bite.

Welcoming Hōkūle’a to American Samoa With Dr. Sylvia Earle

Daniel Lin and Dr. Sylvia Earle (National Geographic Explorer-in-Residence) team up to write about their experience of greeting Hōkūle’a and Hikianalia in American Samoa, and to reflect on the health of the ocean there.

The Highest Conservation Price

In all the money that is devoted to the conservation of the most charismatic species, there is one that has been lifted far above what I thought was the highest plateau of funds devoted to conservation. You might at first think of the Giant Panda. You, however, as I was, would be wrong; although millions…

Watch the Okavango Hangout Video!

The Okavango Google Hangout event is over, but you can still watch the recording and catch up on the highlights!

The Hunt for Alpaca … Skeletons

Sarah Kennedy is using animal remains to dig through Peru’s colonial past. By comparing bone shards from Peru’s northern coast to an alpaca skeleton from Cusco, she might be able to show what Peruvians ate under Spanish rule.

August 17, 2014 Radio Show: Speaking to Hippos, American Seafood Industry Secrets, and More

This week on National Geographic Weekend, join host Boyd Matson and his guests as they explore Africa, fish to satisfy America’s seafood appetite, prevent pollinator colonies from collapsing, provide energy to India’s powerless, road trip 25,000 miles with children, save the lion, understand sperm whale “culture”, and follow our noses to find love.

The Global Status of Sharks

Hunter S. Thompson once wrote “It was the Law of the Sea, they said. Civilization ends at the waterline. Beyond that, we all enter the food chain, and not always right at the top.” While he was talking about piracy and salvage in the Florida Keys, there is an ecological attractiveness in this statement that…

How a Sports Club Is Changing Lives in South Africa

The loop of poverty and apathy persists in the townships of post-apartheid South Africa—but for some youth, there may be a way out.

Hōkūle’a: Crew Training

With all the excitement of Worldwide Voyage being highlighted, it’s easy to forget that 90 percent of a successful voyage happens not in the implementation, but rather, in the preparation. Before ever stepping onto Hōkūle’a and Hikianalia, prospective crew members must undergo intensive training to ensure that they are adequately prepared for sailing in the deep sea.

Inside Europe’s Mystical Sufi Lodges, Part VI: Gjirokaster

In Macedonia, the Bektashis face many challenges, but they fight to keep their doors open to those who are willing to share ideas and hospitality. The mountains of Albania hide some of the most remote of the Bektashi Order, yet they are still legendary among the local people.

Small Caribbean Island Shows Bold Ocean Leadership: Barbuda Overhauls Reef and Fisheries Management for Sustainability

On August 12th, Barbuda Council signed into law a sweeping set of new ocean management regulations that zone their coastal waters, strengthen fisheries management, and establish a network of marine sanctuaries. This comes after seventeen months of extensive community consultation and scientific research supported by the Waitt Institute. With these new policies, the small island…

#okavango14: First-Ever Live-Data Expedition Across Okavango Delta

As the Okavango