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Category archives for Cultures

Is Your Salmon Small Because of Hungry Cavemen?

Stone Age fishermen in northern Spain selected the biggest whoppers, leaving us with a smaller catch, a new study claims.

Rapa Expedition: An Ancient Secret for Protecting the Future

People have survived for centuries on the tiny island of Rapa, carefully managing their resources through an ancient system known as rahui. What lessons does it hold for the rest of the world today?

October 19, 2014: Creating Electricity From Food Waste, Arresting Poachers and More

This week on National Geographic Weekend radio, join host Boyd Matson and his guests as they unearth the habits of the world’s largest-ever carnivore, digest kitchen waste to cook dinner, eat like a 500 year old king, stalk Chernobyl’s ruins, trace tree rings’ roots, write a novel about elephants with a plot twist, kayak to protest dams, prosecute poachers in Mozambique, and see the unseen as a large format film.

Through the Eyes of the Locals

Lost in the middle of a storm, Sadia and Andrew trek up the mountains to find a remote village in authentic Laos.

Rapa Expedition: Off the Ship, Into the Jungle

With winds so strong the waterfalls were flowing upwards, the Pristine Seas crew lands at Rapa Iti and must hike the final miles to make it to the Island Council meeting for permission to begin the expedition.

The Places We Love VII: Cleaning Up India

Thinking of visiting India? Then cheer for the Prime Minister’s new “Clean India” campaign. If successful, it will remove an ugly stain on the rich cultural tapestry of India.

Expedition Diaries: Salvador de Bahia

This post is the latest in the series  Kike Calvo’s visual diary as a National Geographic Expert on the Buenos Aires, Rio and Brazil´s Wild Coast National Geographic Explorer.  A perfect cacophony of drums and Afro-Brazilian percussion instruments seem to infuse every corner as we go up narrow streets to find our hotel in the pastel-hued…

The Worldwide Voyage Goes Underwater

Watch as the Worldwide Voyage takes itself beneath the waves for the first time in the newly expanded Pacific Remote Islands Marine National Monument!

October 12, 2014: Fighting South Pole Frostbite, Bathing Elephants and More

This week on National Geographic Weekend radio, join host Boyd Matson and his guests as they survive frostbite on the frozen continent, explore Haiti’s marine culture, bathe an elephant, bobsled with British champions, dance with Birds of Paradise, learn the Secrets of the National Parks, and discover what has been hiding in Vietnam’s jungles.

Olazul Seeks a Healthy Solution to Depleted Fish Stocks

By Madeleine May For Santiago Cañedo Flores and other fishermen along the La Paz Bay in Baja California Sur, the solution to depleted fish stocks may lie in harvesting an unconventional product: seaweed. Don Santiago and other fishermen in Baja California Sur are partnering with Olazul, a San Francisco-based organization founded in 2009, to design community-owned…

Hōkūleʻa: An Investment in the Future

The true success of the Worldwide Voyage will not be measured by how many miles Hōkūle’a has sailed but by how many people, especially youth, grow to become better stewards of the Earth.

#okavango14: Highlights Of Google HangOut In Okavango Wilderness!

In late-August, we conducted a 17-day, 340km research expedition in dug-out canoes or “mekoro” across the Okavango Delta. It had taken us almost a week to get to “Out There Island” just 30min before this live Google+ Hangout On Air from the remote wilderness of northern Botswana. We were sitting in the middle of one of…

Chilean Near-Shore Fisheries: From Shutdown to Successful Management

By: Carmen Revenga, Sustainable Fisheries Director, The Nature Conservancy and Cristina Rumbaitis del Rio, Senior Associate Director, The Rockefeller Foundation Today, Chile is a global example for good near-shore fisheries management. The emblematic Chilean abalone, and other important seafood, like mussels, limpets, and sea urchins live in the rocky and sandy bottoms along the Chilean…

A Brighter Future for the Hornbills of India

Among the Nyishi people, the ceremonial bopia hat is indispensable, but requires beaks from endangered Asian hornbills. Now, an innovative replacement has emerged.

October 5, 2014: Climbing Into Volcanoes, Swimming the Seven Seas and More

This week on National Geographic Weekend radio, join host Boyd Matson and his guests as they climb into volcanos to look for bacteria, invent environmentally and academically friendly ways to make tea, create the largest marine reserves in the world, make tiny soft robots, swim the seven seas, survive an avalanche, eat ice cream in the name of conservation, and swim with Great white sharks.