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Category archives for Animals

Surprising Pictures: Catlike Creature Rides on Rhino

Editor’s note: James Kydd is the creator and editor of the blog rangerdiaries.com and a professional safari guide. A type of catlike creature called a genet has been spotted catching a ride on the backs of buffalo and white rhinos, new camera trap pictures reveal. As cameras, social media, and technology advance, more and more wildlife…

Palau Expedition: Diving Palau’s Famous Blue Corner

Exploring a well-known diving hotspot gives the Pristine Seas team a sight of one creature they almost never encounter: the vacationing human.

New Zealand’s Spokesbird Sirocco the Kākāpō

This week I met Sirocco the kākāpō, spokesbird for New Zealand conservation. The kākāpō are an emblematic species for New Zealand conservation, and typifying island conservation. The species displays all the hallmarks of island adaptation – flightlessness and gigantism, and on top of that being nocturnal and lek breeding. This certainly makes the species bizarre…

Unusual Encounters: Sea Turtles Roaming Off Los Angeles

“Balloon straight ahead” one of my researchers tells the captain while leaning forward from the bow of our boat. We are so accustomed to find plastic debris during our dolphin surveys off Los Angeles, California, that a party balloon is the first thing that comes to everyone’s mind when we come across something round-shaped floating…

Protecting Our Fortress in the Sky

Standing on the shoulders of giants, Dylan Jones climbs mountains to study the tiny pika—its physical size dwarfed by the scale of its climatological importance. With the implications of climate change becoming more drastic, our mountain fortresses no longer impenetrable.

Mystery Solved: How Archerfish Shoot Water at Prey With Stunning Precision

Archerfish, which use water jets to take down prey, are much more skilled and sophisticated target shooters than thought, a new study says.

Ask Your Weird Animal Questions: What Happens If You Swallow a Spider?

What would happen if you swallowed a poisonous spider? How many birds do you need for a flock? Read this week’s Ask Your Weird Animal Questions.

A Photographic Diary of #Okavango14

James Kydd, professional photographer and conservationist on the Okavango Expedition, shares some of his favorite photos from the trip, as well as the stories surrounding them.

Geography in the News: Swirling Ocean Garbage Dumps

By Neal Lineback and Mandy Lineback Gritzner, Geography in the NewsTM The Great Swirling Pacific Garbage Patch Ocean pollution is growing at an astonishing rate. On June 1, 2008, two scientists and a photographer/blogger sailed from Long Beach, California, and headed westward across the Pacific Ocean to Hawaii. The two men and a woman were…

Can Elephants Survive a Legal Ivory Trade? Debate Is Shifting Against It

It’s one of the more incendiary questions discussed in wildlife conservation circles: Should there be a legal trade in elephant ivory? This debate has been waxing and waning since at least 1989, when the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES) voted to “ban” the international trade in ivory after a ferocious wave of poaching in…

Wild at 50: The Wilderness Act Turns a Half-Century

By John Weaver

Recently, some neo-conservationists have argued that the Wilderness Act is facing a mid-life crisis, that somehow the notion of Wilderness is an anachronism in the ‘Anthropocene’ era of human domination of the planet. They argue that we should focus on domesticating landscapes to serve economic growth of the human juggernaut – rather than protecting remaining wild lands and preventing human-caused extinction of species. Other conservationists – myself included – disagree.

August 31, 2014: Diving Deep For Bioluminescence, Mixing Climate Change With Music and More

This week on National Geographic Weekend, join host Boyd Matson and his guests as they dodge whales and pirates on the Indian Ocean, track poachers in Africa, find lost societies in Orkney, shed light on glowing sharks, harmonize with melting ice in Antarctica, live underwater for 31 days, follow in the pawprints of a lone wolf for 1,200 miles, and rove across the red planet.

Gregg’s Top 10 Okavango Photos

Over the course of the expedition through the Okavango, Gregg has taken huge amounts of photos. Out of such a countless hoard, he has assembled his top 10!

Watch: Surfing Goat and 5 Other Animals That Catch Waves

A surfing goat has inspired its own YouTube channel and children’s book, but it’s not the only pet that’s been trained to catch waves.

Energy East Pipeline: Putting Eastern Canada’s Natural Heritage at Risk

This article is brought to you by the International League of Conservation Photographers (iLCP). Read our other articles on the National Geographic News Watch blog featuring the work of our iLCP Fellow Photographers all around the world. Text and Photos by iLCP Fellow Garth Lenz. This summer I spent two weeks exploring the proposed Energy East tar sands…