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October 12, 2014: Fighting South Pole Frostbite, Bathing Elephants and More

This week on National Geographic Weekend radio, join host Boyd Matson and his guests as they survive frostbite on the frozen continent, explore Haiti’s marine culture, bathe an elephant, bobsled with British champions, dance with Birds of Paradise, learn the Secrets of the National Parks, and discover what has been hiding in Vietnam’s jungles.

Journeying Oregon’s New Marine Reserves by Bike: Cape Falcon (Part 1 of 5)

By Chris Rurik and Helen Helfand The first of Oregon’s five newly designated marine reserves we encounter as we cycle south from the Washington border does not yet exist, except on planning maps. The Cape Falcon Marine Reserve is slated to come into being on the first day of 2016. We try to survey the…

Top 25 Photographs from the Wilderness #21

“The question is not what you look at, but what you see.” Henry David Thoreau A good friend once told me that wildlife photography makes him sad. He explained that when he sees images of the wild creatures and unspoiled places his heart aches too deeply at the thought of what he perceives to be…

Mouse Impacts on Antipodes Island

Eradication of an invasive species from an island must be justified by strong evidence of their negative impacts on the ecosystem, and confidence that those impacts outweigh any unexpected surprise effects which might occur. For invasive rats and mice these impacts have been already well documented globally. In some cases impacts of mice may be…

#okavango14: Highlights Of Google HangOut In Okavango Wilderness!

In late-August, we conducted a 17-day, 340km research expedition in dug-out canoes or “mekoro” across the Okavango Delta. It had taken us almost a week to get to “Out There Island” just 30min before this live Google+ Hangout On Air from the remote wilderness of northern Botswana. We were sitting in the middle of one of…

Ask Your Weird Animal Questions: What’s a Pink Fairy Armadillo?

This week in Ask Your Weird Animal Questions, we get to the bottom of pink fairy armadillos and whether or not you should get an alpaca for a pet.

Springtime and Possibility in Madagascar

Springtime in Madagascar is only just beginning as fall blankets the Northern Hemisphere. It’s a busy, trying, unique and rewarding time to study pathogens in bats!

Snake Robots Crack Mystery of How Reptiles Climb Dunes

High-speed video and customized “snakebots” have revealed that a desert snake uses a highly unique slither to climb sandy hills, a new study says.

Watch Nat Geo’s Roundup of Best Octopus Videos

What better way to mark International Octopus Day than with a roundup of some of our favorite octopus videos. Watch as they battle it out with other sea creatures.

Chilean Near-Shore Fisheries: From Shutdown to Successful Management

By: Carmen Revenga, Sustainable Fisheries Director, The Nature Conservancy and Cristina Rumbaitis del Rio, Senior Associate Director, The Rockefeller Foundation Today, Chile is a global example for good near-shore fisheries management. The emblematic Chilean abalone, and other important seafood, like mussels, limpets, and sea urchins live in the rocky and sandy bottoms along the Chilean…

Ancient “Oddball” Mammal Reshuffles Family Tree?

A mysterious mammal that waded through South Asian swamps 48 million years ago is a distant cousin of modern rhinoceroses and tapirs, a new study says.

Bear Cub Mystery in NYC: Explaining Recent Black Bear News

A mysterious black bear cub found dead in New York City’s Central Park this week could not have gotten there on its own, expert says.

“Remarkable” Spider Eats Mostly Mosquitoes—Could It Fight Malaria?

A jumping spider in Malaysia eats mosquitoes of various species and ages—an unusual preference that could inspire ways to combat malaria and another diseases.

A Brighter Future for the Hornbills of India

Among the Nyishi people, the ceremonial bopia hat is indispensable, but requires beaks from endangered Asian hornbills. Now, an innovative replacement has emerged.

Bluefin Tuna Finally Catch a Break

By Carl Safina and Shana Miller Thirty-three years ago, international fishery managers agreed to stop targeted fishing for giant Atlantic bluefin tuna in the Gulf of Mexico, the only known spawning area for the western population.  Their decision was grounded in one of the basic tenets of fisheries management – catching fish when they aggregate…