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Category archives for Animals

Washington, D.C.’s Snowy Owl Found Dead in Minnesota

A snowy owl that ventured out of the Arctic and into Washington D.C. this past winter dies in Minnesota.

August 24, 2014: How to Survive a Deadly Avalanche, Remembering Fallen War Reporters in Song and More

This week on National Geographic Weekend, join host Boyd Matson and his guests as they survive an avalanche while skiing in Washington, save the environment while winning the Stanley Cup, uncover the tombs of powerful women in the Andes, pay tribute to a pair of fallen war correspondents, sleep on a stranger’s couch, herd reindeer in the Russian arctic, and hold the jaws of crocodiles while we test just how hard they can bite.

4 Videos: Threatened Birds Face Polar Bears, Poop-Sniffing Reporters

The ultimate “canaries in the coal mine,” these threatened birds are giving researchers clues to the kind of world we could lose if climate change ranges unchecked. Watch as these feathered dynamos strut, dance, and sway.

The Highest Conservation Price

In all the money that is devoted to the conservation of the most charismatic species, there is one that has been lifted far above what I thought was the highest plateau of funds devoted to conservation. You might at first think of the Giant Panda. You, however, as I was, would be wrong; although millions…

See-Through Frogs With Green Bones Discovered in Peru

Researchers discover four new species of frog in the Peruvian Andes, three of which are see-through.

The Last Spring: Protecting Florida’s Manatees

This article is brought to you by the International League of Conservation Photographers (iLCP). Read our other articles on the National Geographic News Watch blog featuring the work of our iLCP Fellow Photographers all around the world. Text by iLCP Fellow and Founder Cristina Goettsch Mittermeier Photos by iLCP Fellow Paul Nicklen One of the things I love…

#Okavango14: Elephants Will Sense Your Calm

Ever wonder what it’s like to have an elephant watch you set up your tent at night? Stay calm, and the elephant will carry on.

The Wiley and Surprisingly Cute Hyena

Cute hyena photos—no longer an oxymoron! Jessica Vitale reveals a side of hyenas we seldom see.

Watch the Okavango Hangout Video!

The Okavango Google Hangout event is over, but you can still watch the recording and catch up on the highlights!

Watch: Grouper Slurps Down A Shark, Not A Typical Meal

A massive grouper gobbles down a shark in one bite. The unfortunate victim seems to have been a meal of opportunity rather than part of a steady diet, according to an expert.

Updates From the North Woods

Guest post by Eric Larson, postdoctoral research associate, Shedd Aquarium Where Am I? I’m working predominantly in Vilas County, Wisconsin out of the University of Notre Dame’s Environmental Research Center (UNDERC), as well as doing some research at the University of Wisconsin’s Long Term Ecological Research (LTER) site on Trout Lake. Off the football field,…

Social-Ecological Marine Restoration: A New Vision of Benefits for Nature – And People

The sea goldie (Pseudanthias squamipinnis) a small species of colourful fish. It is a common sight to scuba divers in the Indian Ocean. Credit: Assaf Zvuloni By Dr. Michael Beck, lead marine scientist, The Nature Conservancy Location Post: The Gulf of Aqaba. Red Sea reef restoration projects. Last month, I dove on some amazing reef…

Are You Kidding? Larger Tanks Won’t Cut it for Killer Whales

Once again Sea World is missing the point. The aquatic entertainment enterprise just doesn’t seem to give up despite documentaries like Blackfish and a growing public awareness that keeping cetaceans in captivity is cruel and morally wrong. Even Wall Street is turning its back on the company. Now, with a new and grandiose multi-million dollar plan for expanding their killer whale tanks, Sea World is taking the “logical” next step to resurrect itself.

Scientists Solve Mystery of How Hummingbirds Taste Sweetness

How hummingbirds acquired their sweet tooth has been quite the mystery. But scientists think they may cracked the case.

The End of a Triassic Adventure

The Spitsbergen Jurassic Research Group, led by National Geographic Explorer Dr. Jørn Hurum, is blazing its next great expedition to the icy rim of the world in search of stunningly preserved fossils. Wrapping up a great expedition, Aubrey and Victoria reflect on what was accomplished.