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Category archives for Animals

Special Squeaky Sloth Video

National Geograpic Emerging Explorer Lucy Cooke, creator of Slothville, is on a one-woman crusade to show the world why some of the most unlovable animals are actually the most interesting and deserving of our attention, study, and protection. Her new book, The Little Book of Sloth, celebrates the sloth: the cutest, cuddliest, slowest creature on…

Mystery Solved: Why Flies Are So Hard to Swat

Flies on the wing react to threats like fighter jets, banking away in a fraction of the blink of an eye, a new study says.

Stanford: There’s No Money in Dead Bears

April 1st saw the opening of another trophy hunt season in British Columbia, a sport in which armed hunters stalk bears, moose and other selective wild game animals, killing them and retaining their paws and heads as memorial. Long considered morally unsound by scientists and conservationists, researchers are again questioning controversial industry claims that trophy…

Pumas in the Rocks, Pumas in the Grass

At San Guillermo, pumas stalk through the grasses and canyons, looking to kill. But vicuñas need to go to those very places for food and water. It’s like Russian roulette – but they do it every single day.

Why Have Tigers Been Feared and Revered Throughout History?

Talking Tigers: Part 5 of a 12-part series Throughout human history, the diverse peoples who populated the vast Asian continent have had one thing in common: They feared and revered the tiger. Throughout this cat’s range, their stealthy, illusory habits—suddenly appearing and disappearing in dense forests, often at night—elevated them to the status of otherworldly beings.…

Trekking in the Footsteps of a Lone Wolf for Coexistence

In late 2011, a lone wolf walked across Oregon and entered California, becoming the first wild wolf in the state in nearly 90 years.

He was called a hero, a killing-machine, a rogue, a beacon of hope, a foreign invader from Canada, and school children named him Journey. No matter his name, he came to represent the return of wolves to their historic rangelands in the American Pacific Northwest.

Of Sharks and Men: An Expedition to Study Shark Ecology and Movement Patterns in Fiji

“At first, there were just two or three and they just circled us. Each day moving a little bit closer. We would just sit on the bottom…and wait,” Papa says, his voice quieting for effect like a trained storyteller trying to excite a group of boy scouts around a campfire. Manasa Bulivou, or ‘Papa’, is…

Your Weird Animal Questions Answered: Is Your Dog Part Coyote?

Is your dog part coyote? Do St. Bernards really rescue people? Get the facts on man’s best friend in this week’s column.

Debunking Captivity: 3 Reasons Not to Keep Dolphins in a Tank

By Maddalena Bearzi   I have spent much time in the company of wild dolphins over the last twenty-something years. I’ve built a career following their everyday movements and observing their behavior both from shore and from research boats. When I began my studies, I knew these creatures primarily as the objects of my research but,…

Top 25 Wild Bird Photographs of the Week #64

Kingfishers, fish-eagles, orioles, flycatchers, lovebirds, wagtails, bush-shrikes, broadbills, bee-eaters, and laughing-thrushes… A fantastic collection of wild bird photographs that sets the standard for 2014! All these photographers need to be commended for their commitment and skill. We need to do everything we can to make sure that our children get to see, hear and photograph…

Why Do Adult Cougars Kill Each Other?

F51, an adult female mountain lion currently tracked by Panthera’s Teton Cougar Project, meandered towards the eastern edge of her range, her two female offspring bouncing like electrons in orbit around her. Who can say what a mountain lion thinks, but from our perspective, life seemed good for F51. The family had fed off a…

Partnership Protects America’s Largest Native Trout in Dry Nevada

By John Zablocki and Zeb Hogan Few places in the world keep their secrets as well as Northern Nevada.  Ask anyone driving across the northern half of the state along U.S. Highway 50 (widely referred to as the “Loneliest Road in America”) what they saw, and the most common reply will be “a whole-lot-of-nothin’.”  From…

April 6, 2014: Riding Horses Across Continents, Swimming in the Arctic Ocean and More

Every week, embark with host Boyd Matson on an exploration of the latest discoveries and interviews with some of the most fascinating people on the planet, on National Geographic Weekend. Please check listings near you to find the best way to listen to National Geographic Weekend on radio, or listen below! Hour 1 - Filipe Masetti left Calgary, Alberta on horseback nearly two…

Geography in the News: Tragic Deaths of Amphibians

By Neal Lineback and Mandy Lineback Gritzner, Geography in the NewsTM Dying Frogs, Salamanders, and Other Amphibians A deadly fungus is attacking Earth’s amphibian species. Unfortunately, the disease seems to be winning and its price may be the extinction of frogs, toads and salamanders. The disease, called chytridiomycosis, or chytrid for short, has been decimating…

Sperm Banking Revives Endangered Mexican Wolf

Earlier this week, the USFWS announced that a pregnant, captive born, female Mexican wolf reared at Chicago’s Brookfield Zoo will be released next week into the Blue Range Wolf Recovery Area of Arizona as a part of the Mexican wolf recovery effort in the United States. F1126, known as “Ernesta” to zoo staff, has been…