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Category archives for Animals

The Future of the Past in Palau

Enric Sala and team are back in the big blue on their latest expedition to explore and document the world’s most pristine seas. This time, the destination is the Micronesian island group of Palau.

Five New “Flying Monkeys” Identified in Amazon

Five species of acrobatic monkey that have long flown under the scientific radar have been named in South America, a new study says.

Wilderness: As it Was in the Beginning

This article is brought to you by the International League of Conservation Photographers (iLCP). Read our other articles on the National Geographic News Watch blog featuring the work of our iLCP Fellow Photographers all around the world. Text and Photography by iLCP Fellow Krista Schlyer September 3rd, 2014, marks the 50th anniversary of The Wilderness Act–Americans will be…

#Okavango14: Listen to the Sound of a Golden Okavango Morning

Listen to the sounds of a morning in the Okavango River Delta, courtesy of Steve Boyes and the Okavango Expedition!

Ask Your Weird Animal Questions: Alligators and Regenerators

How long can alligators live out of the water? Are there more animals out there that can re-grow body parts? Read this week’s Ask Your Weird Animal Questions.

Turning Divers into Citizen Scientists

Lindsay Aylesworth is a PhD Candidate with Project Seahorse at the University of British Columbia, Canada. In Thailand, she collaborates with Dr. Tse-Lynn Loh, postdoctoral research associate at the John G. Shedd Aquarium, to investigate how seahorse catch and trade affect their wild populations, which helps to inform seahorse conservation and management. Recently, Lindsay co-authored…

#Okavango14: Animals Gallery From Twitter

This summer’s Okavango expedition has

Wolves Vulnerable to Contagious Yawning

Contagious yawning in wolves give researchers a glimpse at the roots of empathy.

Q&A: Landmark Report Reveals Crucial Links in the Illegal Ivory Trade

While there are effectively unlimited numbers of poachers and consumers fueling the lucrative illegal ivory market, a new report suggests that nearly all the ivory shuttled from Africa to Asia—the biggest market—is confined to as few as 200 shipping containers a year.

Washington, D.C.’s Snowy Owl Found Dead in Minnesota

A snowy owl that ventured out of the Arctic and into Washington D.C. this past winter dies in Minnesota.

August 24, 2014: How to Survive a Deadly Avalanche, Remembering Fallen War Reporters in Song and More

This week on National Geographic Weekend, join host Boyd Matson and his guests as they survive an avalanche while skiing in Washington, save the environment while winning the Stanley Cup, uncover the tombs of powerful women in the Andes, pay tribute to a pair of fallen war correspondents, sleep on a stranger’s couch, herd reindeer in the Russian arctic, and hold the jaws of crocodiles while we test just how hard they can bite.

4 Videos: Threatened Birds Face Polar Bears, Poop-Sniffing Reporters

The ultimate “canaries in the coal mine,” these threatened birds are giving researchers clues to the kind of world we could lose if climate change ranges unchecked. Watch as these feathered dynamos strut, dance, and sway.

The Highest Conservation Price

In all the money that is devoted to the conservation of the most charismatic species, there is one that has been lifted far above what I thought was the highest plateau of funds devoted to conservation. You might at first think of the Giant Panda. You, however, as I was, would be wrong; although millions…

See-Through Frogs With Green Bones Discovered in Peru

Researchers discover four new species of frog in the Peruvian Andes, three of which are see-through.

The Last Spring: Protecting Florida’s Manatees

This article is brought to you by the International League of Conservation Photographers (iLCP). Read our other articles on the National Geographic News Watch blog featuring the work of our iLCP Fellow Photographers all around the world. Text by iLCP Fellow and Founder Cristina Goettsch Mittermeier Photos by iLCP Fellow Paul Nicklen One of the things I love…