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Bobcats Prowl Among Us: Haunt Birdfeeders, Brooks, Boulevards

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It’s on the prowl from three hours before sunset until midnight, and again before dawn ‘til three hours after sunrise.  Each night, it moves two to seven miles, mostly on the same route. Along the way it visits, like the humans in whose shadow it lives, known locales.  But its stomping grounds are a hollow…

The Coral Triangle: Amazon of the Oceans

This article is brought to you by the International League of Conservation Photographers (iLCP). Read our other articles on the National Geographic News Watch blog featuring the work of our iLCP Fellow Photographers all around the world. Text and photos by iLCP Fellow James Morgan. I’ve been fortunate to see most of the world’s oceans the past couple…

Why Some Males Evolved to Be Small and Sneaky

Bigger males may get a lot of attention, but sometimes being smaller and having a different strategy is more successful when it comes to mating.

Top 25 Wild Bird Photographs of the Week #72

Firethroats, kingfishers, openbills, nightjars, stilts, leafbirds, roadrunners, mangos, laughthrushes, and rubythroats are featured in this 72nd edition of the “Top 25 Wild Bird Photographs of the Week”! With almost 600,000 followers on the Wild Bird Trust Facebook page, the Wild Bird Revolution is accelerating towards our goal of 1 million Wild Bird Enthusiasts by the end…

Stayin’ Alive: Baby Mantis Shrimp Use Light to Stay Invisible

Young mantis shrimp that depend on transparent bodies to avoid predators, use reflectors in their eyes to make them invisible, according to a new study.

Following Nemo: Clownfish Make Epic Ocean Journeys

Turns out finding Nemo could take a while—a new study reveals for the first time that baby clownfish travel up to 250 miles in search of a new reef.

Transforming Indonesia’s Manta Fisheries

This article is brought to you by the International League of Conservation Photographers (iLCP). Read our other articles on the National Geographic News Watch blog featuring the work of our iLCP Fellow Photographers all around the world. Text and photos by iLCP Fellow Shawn Heinrichs Transforming Indonesia’s Manta Fisheries: The path to creating an effective Manta Sanctuary Indonesia announced…

Toxic “Toupee”: Explaining the Most Venomous Caterpillar in the U.S.

No warm and fuzzy here—a possible boom in a highly venomous but irresistibly touchable caterpillar is sending people in the eastern U.S. to the hospital.

September 14, 2014: Wiring an African Wilderness, Starting a Garbage-Fueled Country and More

This week on National Geographic Weekend radio, join host Boyd Matson and his guests as they discover a well-dressed Italian mummy, proclaim a nation devoted to garbage, find the perfect island, find new ways to survive cancer, explore the Okavango Delta for science, relate to a solitary blue whale, celebrate the Wilderness Act, and create a canine soup.

Rare Black-Footed Ferret Babies

Christin Jones joins in on a late-night black-footed ferret tour to ascertain their numbers. In the fight against extinction, every individual counts.

Seeking Digital Volunteers to Search & Protect Namibia’s Wildlife (Using Aerial Imagery from UAVs)

Patrick Meier is using UAVs, popularly called “drones”, to map out archaeological sites and aid humanitarian and environmental efforts. He partners with institutions around the globe to bring us amazing, interactive community projects and, of course, stunning aerial photos. New Update Here! UAVs are increasingly used in humanitarian response. We have thus added a new…

Slow Loris Outreach Week Is Here (Didn’t You Know?)

One of the world’s most endangered primates is also one of its cutest. Learn about the slow loris and how National Geographic grantee Anna Nekaris is working to protect them in the wild.

“Extinct” Snail Found Alive—But for How Long?

“So I was wrong,” scientist says about extinction—but cautions the purple-and-pink mollusk is still perilously close to dying out.

7 Bug and Spider Myths Squashed

How many spiders do we really eat in a year? Can cockroaches survive nuclear winter? What’s the difference between venomous and poisonous?

Maasai Steppe Warrior for Wildlife Elvis Kisimir Speaks Up for Lions

“In a few years to come, the world will only see the rare lion spoor on the sandy soil. If the wind blows, then even those spoor will go.” One extraordinary Maasai warrior shares his message for the world about the future of big cats. Elvis Kisimir experiences the full extent of familial responsibility while…