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Category archives for Animals

Can Artificial Insemination Save Endangered Species?

Assisted reproduction is becoming one of the tools conservationists use to help manage endangered species populations.

Mystery Solved: How Snakes Climb Trees

Researchers discover that for snakes climbing trees, it’s all about safety first.

Longtime Sea Urchin Diving Partners Lead the Way in Sea Kelp Restoration, Technology and Collaboration

By Leanne Weiss Terry Herzik (67), Gary Thompson (71), and Lucy, Gary’s 8-year-old Chihuahua, board the Sunstar at dawn with enough food and fuel for the next three days. As they pull away, in their 34-foot vessel the sun is just beginning to rise over Fish Harbor, in San Pedro, Los Angeles. They’ll head southwest…

Female Turtles “Talk” to Their Hatchlings, Scientists Discover

New research finds that female giant South American river turtles “talk” to their hatchlings.

August 17, 2014 Radio Show: Speaking to Hippos, American Seafood Industry Secrets, and More

This week on National Geographic Weekend, join host Boyd Matson and his guests as they explore Africa, fish to satisfy America’s seafood appetite, prevent pollinator colonies from collapsing, provide energy to India’s powerless, road trip 25,000 miles with children, save the lion, understand sperm whale “culture”, and follow our noses to find love.

Eric Chen’s Galápagos Getaway

Eric Chen is the grand prize winner of this year’s Google Science Fair for his work on new influenza treatments. As part of his prize, he was invited by National Geographic to tour the Galapagos Islands and encounter all that nature has to offer. For this young biochemist, visiting the cradle of the theory of evolution was a dream come true. National Geographic has been a Google Science Fair partner since it launched four years ago.

Badger Time

There’s always something to see in the grasslands at the American Prairie Reserve. However, every once in a while, Landmark adventure science crews see something out of the ordinary.

Poisons and Poaching: A Deadly Mix Requiring Urgent Action

Elephant and rhino poachers are increasingly turning to poisons with devastating consequences. If the tide is not stemmed soon, many species will be utterly destroyed by the demand for their parts in East Asia.

New York City to Niagara Falls by Bicycle … With Kids

Most people turn their eyes away from roadkill, but ASC adventurer Charles Scott and his children spent five weeks actively looking for the remains of animals along the road and documenting what they found.

Why Are Jellyfish Swarming This Summer?

Swarms of jellyfish that have appeared recently in the Pacific Northwest and the United Kingdom are not unusual, but may signal an ocean out of balance, experts say.

The Global Status of Sharks

Hunter S. Thompson once wrote “It was the Law of the Sea, they said. Civilization ends at the waterline. Beyond that, we all enter the food chain, and not always right at the top.” While he was talking about piracy and salvage in the Florida Keys, there is an ecological attractiveness in this statement that…

Moving Cheetahs out of Danger

By Florian Weise,  N/a’an ku sê Carnivore Conservation Research Project, Namibia and National Geographic Big Cats Initiative grantee.   Last week a livestock farmer called to report a cheetah caught in a trap. He won’t release the animal on site — it will kill his livestock. But knowing about the species’ imperiled status he does…

Sylvia Earle’s ‘Mission Blue’ Arrives on Netflix Today

Through interviews, old home movies, and breathtaking new footage, see what has inspired this indomitable scientist to dedicate her life to protecting the ocean.

Commemorating A Milestone in Ocean Exploration

At a time when no one had previously descended deeper than 350 feet and survived, Beebe and Barton set out in 1930 to explore the vast depths of the Atlantic near the island of Bermuda in the bathysphere submersible invented by Barton. The men crammed into a cast iron sphere that was 4.75 feet in diameter with 1” thick walls to withstand the immense pressure of the ocean’s depths.

#Okavango14: Monitoring the Delta From the Front Lines

ASC volunteers will manage remote wildlife platforms, monitoring the delta’s fragile ecosystem and collecting data to ensure this area is protected for years to come.