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Lonesome George Unveiled in New York City

Lonesome George, the famous Galápagos Island tortoise that was the last of his kind when he died in 2012, is due to get some company.

7 More Bug Myths Squashed: Giant Killer Insects, Flesh-Eating Beetles

Can roaches really get stuck in your ear? Will scarab beetles really crawl into your body and eat you alive? We take on seven more bug myths suggested by our readers.

Why Some Males Evolved to Be Small and Sneaky

Bigger males may get a lot of attention, but sometimes being smaller and having a different strategy is more successful when it comes to mating.

Stayin’ Alive: Baby Mantis Shrimp Use Light to Stay Invisible

Young mantis shrimp that depend on transparent bodies to avoid predators, use reflectors in their eyes to make them invisible, according to a new study.

Following Nemo: Clownfish Make Epic Ocean Journeys

Turns out finding Nemo could take a while—a new study reveals for the first time that baby clownfish travel up to 250 miles in search of a new reef.

Toxic “Toupee”: Explaining the Most Venomous Caterpillar in the U.S.

No warm and fuzzy here—a possible boom in a highly venomous but irresistibly touchable caterpillar is sending people in the eastern U.S. to the hospital.

“Extinct” Snail Found Alive—But for How Long?

“So I was wrong,” scientist says about extinction—but cautions the purple-and-pink mollusk is still perilously close to dying out.

7 Bug and Spider Myths Squashed

How many spiders do we really eat in a year? Can cockroaches survive nuclear winter? What’s the difference between venomous and poisonous?

Ask Your Weird Animal Questions: Jumping Spiders, Angry Cats

Can elephants track scents? How can a jumping spider travel so fast? Read this week’s Ask Your Weird Animal Questions column.

Photo: Mite Attacking Ant Entombed in Amber, Oldest Fossil of Its Kind

An ancient ant with a mite attached to its head is the oldest such fossil ever found, a new study says.

Mongoose Fends Off Lions: Explaining Viral Video

A mongoose that survived a tussle with four African lions may have been dealing with playful youngsters, a biologist says.

Why Do Males Have Built-in Weapons?

The impressive array of male weaponry—from horns to antlers to claws—evolved from individual species’ combat styles, a new study says.

Watch: Fish and Eels Team Up to Catch Prey—Rare Among Animals

Talk about lending a helping “fin”—groupers and eels in a coral reef work together to catch prey, a new study says.

Surprising Pictures: Catlike Creature Rides on Rhino

Editor’s note: James Kydd is the creator and editor of the blog rangerdiaries.com and a professional safari guide. A type of catlike creature called a genet has been spotted catching a ride on the backs of buffalo and white rhinos, new camera trap pictures reveal. As cameras, social media, and technology advance, more and more wildlife…

Mystery Solved: How Archerfish Shoot Water at Prey With Stunning Precision

Archerfish, which use water jets to take down prey, are much more skilled and sophisticated target shooters than thought, a new study says.