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Female Flies’ Previous Lovers Affect Size of Later Children

A female fly’s previous sexcapades can have a profound effect on how her future children look, redefining the way scientists think about inheritance in insects.

Fisherman Rescues Drowning Eagle: Explaining Viral Video

Get the story behind how a young eagle ended up struggling in the water—and how it’s faring now.

Foodie Bees: Insects Head Downtown for Dinner

Foodies aren’t the only ones these days swarming cities in search of the best eats: Bees also prefer to eat in cities, new research shows.

5 Surprising Facts About Squirrels (Hint: They Make Jerky)

As squirrels in the Northern Hemisphere hoard food for winter, we take a look at the industrious and diverse rodents, which can range from a half an ounce to 20 pounds.

Mysterious New Poison Dart Frog Found; Is Size of Fingernail

A new species of bright-orange, fingernail-size frog found in a Panama rain forest is unlike any of its relatives, scientists say.

Ask Your Weird Animal Questions: Can a Tortoise Live to 300?

We tell you if a tricentenarian tortoise is really possible, why lovebugs don’t get eaten, and why your cat loves a clean litter box.

What’s That Weird Purple Sea Creature? Explaining Viral Video

A weird garbage-like creature spotted in the Gulf of Mexico is a rare type of jellyfish relative, scientists say.

Ask Your Weird Animal Questions: Why Do Lobsters Turn Red When Cooked?

Are wood roaches different than cockroaches? Do killer whales usually attack in groups? See this week’s Ask Your Weird Animal Questions.

Lonesome George Unveiled in New York City

Lonesome George, the famous Galápagos Island tortoise that was the last of his kind when he died in 2012, is due to get some company.

7 More Bug Myths Squashed: Giant Killer Insects, Flesh-Eating Beetles

Can roaches really get stuck in your ear? Will scarab beetles really crawl into your body and eat you alive? We take on seven more bug myths suggested by our readers.

Why Some Males Evolved to Be Small and Sneaky

Bigger males may get a lot of attention, but sometimes being smaller and having a different strategy is more successful when it comes to mating.

Stayin’ Alive: Baby Mantis Shrimp Use Light to Stay Invisible

Young mantis shrimp that depend on transparent bodies to avoid predators, use reflectors in their eyes to make them invisible, according to a new study.

Following Nemo: Clownfish Make Epic Ocean Journeys

Turns out finding Nemo could take a while—a new study reveals for the first time that baby clownfish travel up to 250 miles in search of a new reef.

Toxic “Toupee”: Explaining the Most Venomous Caterpillar in the U.S.

No warm and fuzzy here—a possible boom in a highly venomous but irresistibly touchable caterpillar is sending people in the eastern U.S. to the hospital.

“Extinct” Snail Found Alive—But for How Long?

“So I was wrong,” scientist says about extinction—but cautions the purple-and-pink mollusk is still perilously close to dying out.