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Mexico’s Blind Cave Fish: Freshwater Species of the Week

If you don’t use it, you lose it—at least this appears to be the case for a blind cave fish found in Mexico and the southern U.S. known as Astyanax mexicanus. Descended from an eyed surface fish, over long periods of time the subterranean form of the same species has adapted to darkness, accumulating new…

Report Shows Unanimous Support for Colorado River Conservation

“Mapping the River Ahead,” a new report by Carpe Diem West, provides an insightful discussion of solutions for the Colorado River Basin.  The authors conducted anonymous interviews with more than 30 “water leaders” (disclosure, I was among them) representing a broad range of sectors and locations.  The anonymous process was a useful strategy to get…

The Urban Water Cycle: Sustaining Our Modern Cities

By Robert B. Sowby Most of us understand the basics of the hydrologic cycle—condensation, precipitation, transportation, and evaporation. These processes operate on global scales and in natural environments. But on local scales and in engineered environments like cities, a different cycle dominates: the urban water cycle. For the first time in history, slightly more than…

Robert Redford and Will Ferrell “Fight” Over the Colorado River

Stars Robert Redford and Will Ferrell have a bone to pick with each other when it comes to water. Well, not really, but they do make some good points in this funny video calling for restoration of the embattled, and thirsty, Colorado River Basin. The celebrities are working to support Raise the River, a campaign building…

Salmon Trucked to Ocean? Freshwater Species of the Week

The annual fall run of young salmon from their inland birthplaces in rivers to the sea is one of Nature’s dramatic migrations. But this year, a number of chinook salmon may make that journey by truck. This week, state and federal wildlife officials in northern California announced that they will ferry hatchery-raised salmon to the…

Late Journalist Matthew Power Inspired a Generation

By Justin Nobel I think guides are dangerous, no one can show you the way. The world changes too swiftly, even if someone has just cracked the code, five minutes later the digits are different. And besides, you are different, you are not them, and if you trail too close your own work will never…

Incredibly Rare Tornado Sighting Over Lake Kariba

Amazing images of a rare system captured over Lake Kariba during a huge thunderstorm. Paul Steyn recounts the remarkable experience.

Google Street View Reveals Grand Canyon

You’ve used Google’s Street View to navigate unfamiliar cities. Now, you can use it to explore a river. Today, Google, in partnership with American Rivers, is launching the Colorado River Street View. The imagery features the iconic Grand Canyon — 286 miles of the river, from Lee’s Ferry to Pearce Ferry. It marks the first…

Volunteers Needed to Study American Eels

This week, a trio of organizations have asked the public to help gather data on one of New York City’s more slippery residents: the American eel (Anguilla rostrata). (We previously profiled the American eel as a Freshwater Species of the Week in August 2012.) Wildlife Conservation Society’s New York Aquarium, the New York State Department…

A Favorite Massachusetts Stream Loses a Dam – and Gains Aquatic Habitat

In early January, on a visit back to my old stomping grounds in western Massachusetts, I trekked along the snowy banks of Amethyst Brook, a beautiful headwater tributary in the Connecticut River watershed. My mission was to see the site of a dam removed in late 2012. I’d hiked through this area in the towns…

Short on Water? Don’t Blame it on the Rain

The common refrain in media stories about water shortages is that they are caused by droughts.  Don’t believe them. Droughts don’t cause water shortages.  People do. The water shortages appearing with increasing frequency and intensity around the globe are, regretfully, poignant signs of our society’s woeful inability to govern itself within limits, or to plan…

The U.S. and Mexico Partner to Save the Colorado River Delta

Since 1960, the Colorado River has not flowed regularly to the sea. While pockets of green remain, the Colorado in its delta is a parched river begging for relief. The dry, sandy channel glares in the bright sun, abandoned by the river that has been overtapped and overworked for too long. It’s hard not to think of the…

The Mexican “Water Monster” Resurfaces: Freshwater Species of the Week

Feared extinct, another axolotl has been found in Mexico City—but will the amphibian hang on?

Ancient Voices Through a Modern Microphone

Hear what indigenous cultures have to say regarding the health of our rivers, and what we need to do to live in better harmony with our natural surroundings.

Help Return the Colorado River to the Sea

Imagine if one day you couldn’t get home.  Your journey stopped short of where you were supposed to be. That’s the story of the iconic Colorado River, which sculpted the Grand Canyon and today sustains 30 million people, but now stops flowing 90 miles before reaching the sea, its final destination. With partners, Change the…