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Rare Siamese Crocodiles Released as Ambassadors for Laotian Wetland

Seventeen Critically Endangered juvenile Siamese crocodiles have been released into into a protected wetland in Laos, the Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS) announced today. The Siamese crocodile is named Freshwater Species of the Week for its critical role in the fragile Xe Champhone and other wetlands in Southeast Asia. Saving the species from the brink of extinction in the wild and restoring its habitat will help ensure a healthy environment and create socio-economic opportunities for the people who depend on the wetlands.

#Okavango14: Animals Gallery From Twitter

This summer’s Okavango expedition has

Artist Anne Neely Evokes the Mystery and Magic of Water

Motivated by concern over growing threats to the world of water, Boston-area artist Anne Neely undertook a decade-long search to understand and interpret what is happening to rivers, lakes, oceans, glaciers and aquifers. “I approach painting by asking questions, just as a scientist does,” Neely writes in Water Stories, the companion book to the exhibit…

#Okavango14: Out There …

Poling 10,000 years back in time.

What’s a Fishing Spider? Behind the Arachnid Trending on Facebook

Freshwater Species of the Week: Fishing Spider

When the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources posted on its Facebook page that giant fishing spiders had been spotted around the state the news was shared more than 10,000 times. More than 2,000 comments were received, including from people posting their own images of the arachnids. Many posters expressed concern and abhorrence. But these are amazing animals with super powers, able to walk or sail with the wind on water, and they can haul up aquatic animals five times their weight.

See-Through Frogs With Green Bones Discovered in Peru

Researchers discover four new species of frog in the Peruvian Andes, three of which are see-through.

The Last Spring: Protecting Florida’s Manatees

This article is brought to you by the International League of Conservation Photographers (iLCP). Read our other articles on the National Geographic News Watch blog featuring the work of our iLCP Fellow Photographers all around the world. Text by iLCP Fellow and Founder Cristina Goettsch Mittermeier Photos by iLCP Fellow Paul Nicklen One of the things I love…

#Okavango14: Elephants Will Sense Your Calm

Ever wonder what it’s like to have an elephant watch you set up your tent at night? Stay calm, and the elephant will carry on.

Young Farmers in the Western U. S. Adapt to a Water-Scarce Future

Sipping raw, whole, grass-fed milk is a bit like tasting fine wine: a familiar experience, but much more special. That was my feeling when I drank a glass this week from De Smet Dairy in Bosque Farms, New Mexico, a small town nestled in the middle Rio Grande Valley. With his wife Erica, Mike De…

Female Turtles “Talk” to Their Hatchlings, Scientists Discover

New research finds that female giant South American river turtles “talk” to their hatchlings.

Public Helps Restore Flows to Critically Depleted Rivers

Change the Course, a water restoration movement led by National Geographic Fellow Sandra Postel, has encouraged some 70,000 people to cut their water footprint and restored 2 billion gallons of water to the Colorado River Basin. The model will be presented at this year’s Stockholm Water Symposium during World Water Week.

The Monsoon Strategies of the Threatened Chiricahua Leopard Frog

The monsoon delivers about one third of the annual 15-inch average precipitation in Arizona’s Ciénega Valley, for a few hours flooding pools and increasing streamflow up to a hundred times the normal rate through Ciénega Creek and Pantano Wash. The crest for a one-to-two inch rain brings a muddy torrent through Empire Gulch, roiling water, moving rocks and logs, picking up soil and debris. What strategy does the normally placid stream’s Chiracahua leopard frog use to survive the onslaught?

Colorado River Basin’s “Natural Capital” Delivers up to Half a Trillion in Annual Benefits, New Study Says

Last week I spent time around the Animas, La Plata, and San Juan Rivers in southwestern Colorado – generally the area between Pagosa Springs and Mesa Verde National Park, where the elaborate cliff-dwelling ruins of the Anasazi remind us that what we call home may not last forever. On one bright blue day pushing 90…

#okavango14: First-Ever Live-Data Expedition Across Okavango Delta

As the Okavango

Protecting Asia’s Giant Salmon, one River at a Time

Portland, Oregon – Big news about a big fish this week, in a forgotten corner of the world.  Our Russian conservation partner, Khabarovsk Wildlife Foundation, announced the creation of a new freshwater protected area (PA) in the Russian Far East, the Tugursky Nature Reserve (see Wild Salmon Center press release here). This large river system,…