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Pristine Seas: Mozambique Expedition Launches

As day dawns in the southeastern African coastal nation of Mozambique today, Pristine Seas Expedition Leader Paul Rose and team begin the latest in an ongoing series of missions to explore and document the biodiversity of the most untouched areas in the world’s oceans.

What’s an Acre of Seagrass Worth? $80,000 in Fish Alone

By Philine zu Ermgassen, postdoctoral fellow at Cambridge University and Dr. Mark Spalding, senior scientist with The Nature Conservancy For decades, dire tales of collapsing fish stocks were told, only to fall on deaf ears. Then, in a 2008 report, “Sunken Billions,” the World Bank and the FAO began to couch the problem in entirely…

More, Bigger, Better Marine Conservation

Recently one of my peers referred to doing more conservation as addressing the problem of how to take marine protection to scale.  Covering nearly 70% of the planet and home to thousands of species of plants and animals, the ocean certainly represents a huge management problem. For some marine conservation funders, global scaling of marine…

The Ocean Comes to Sacramento

Sometimes California gets it right. When it comes to protecting its coast and ocean, the state’s citizens guarantee that. March 24 will mark the 7th annual Ocean Day in Sacramento with dozens of marine conservation activists from Environment California, Heal the Bay, Surfrider, Coastkeeper Alliance and others descending on the Statehouse from up and down…

“First Ever” Photos of Rare Albino Marlin

On March 11, an angler hooked a rare fish: a 300-pound albino blue marlin. The animal was released alive, and photos of the encounter may be the first recorded images of an albino blue marlin, according to the Billfish Report. It was about 1 pm, during a charter fishing trip on the 42-foot boat Spanish…

“Reptile-Like” Bird and Sea Turtles Released on Indonesian Beach

A remote, protected beach on the Indonesian island of Sulawesi is a critical nesting area for “strange” birds called maleos and olive ridley sea turtles, reports the Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS) in New York. On February 23 on Sulawesi’s Binerean Cape, conservationists with WCS and local partner PALS (Pelestari Alam Liar dan Satwa, or Wildlife and…

New Video Shines Light on Walking Shark Discovery

In the first of a new video series by The Pew Charitable Trusts, a scientist explains how he found a new species of walking shark off Indonesia. According to Pew: Scientist Mark Erdmann was participating in a nighttime scuba dive off the coast of Halmahera, Indonesia when he stumbled on a new species of walking…

Financing Sustainable Fisheries With Impact Investments

Impact IQ – What’s good for the fish is good for the fishing communities — and for impact investors. That’s the thesis of three new vehicles for investing in sustainable fisheries that will be tested in the Philippines, Chile, and Brazil over the next two years and then offered to investors more broadly. Former New York City…

Robot Eyes Protecting From Above: Drones and Ocean Conservation

A robust and healthy ocean is the lifeblood for our planet, sustaining life through interconnected ecosystems worldwide. Unfortunately, as a result of global industrial overfishing pressure, many of these ecosystems have shown signs of rapid deterioration. This is particularly bad in the high seas, the part of the oceans that lie beyond 200-miles off the…

Vanishing Innocents: Fish, Dolphins, and Other Sea Creatures in Troubled Waters

By Maddalena Bearzi of the Ocean Conservation Society Sardinia has a unique and unforgettable scent, different from any other place I’ve known. It’s the scent of the Mediterranean undergrowth, of junipers and myrtles. If I close my eyes and concentrate, I can almost smell it even now, thousands of miles away and many years later.…

From Night Vision to Heaters, 3 of the Ocean’s Most Remarkable Eyes

This post is reprinted, with permission, from The Extreme Life of the Sea, by Stephen Palumbi and Tony Palumbi, Princeton University Press 2014. Evolution throws countless designs at the proverbial wall and steps back to see what sticks. All that evolution really needs is a big, variable population to experiment on and a lot of…

Pharrell Williams Launches Denim Line Made From Recycled Ocean Debris

Singer, songwriter, and producer Pharrell Williams has a hit new album out and collaborated on last summer’s two hottest songs (“Get Lucky” and “Blurred Lines.”) And now he can add sustainable fashion to his list of accomplishments. Williams answered questions from Ocean Views (below) on his latest project with clothing maker G-Star RAW. In addition…

Streamers: A Win-Win for Seabirds and Fishermen

By Nicole Perman Until recently, it seemed as though the short-tailed albatross would not be able to escape extinction.  These endangered seabirds have been threatened first by hunting, and more recently by overfishing in the North Pacific and Bering Seas, and by their less-than-ideal primary breeding ground – a small volcanically active island called Tori-shima,…

Can Behavioral Economics Help Save Coral Reefs and Fisheries?

It’s not that people don’t care about the environment; it’s that more pressing needs like feeding their families and paying their bills trump environmental concerns. As a marine biologist, I worry about how poverty can hinder the sustainability of fishing, and therefore endanger the future of fishing communities. The “teach a man to fish” adage can only hold…

The Top 5 Challenges Facing the New NOAA Administrator

This article was originally published by the Center for American Progress. As former astronaut Kathryn Sullivan takes over NOAA, she faces challenges worthy of a rocket scientist. Today, the Senate confirmed the appointment of Dr. Kathryn Sullivan to be the new administrator of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. She replaces Dr. Jane Lubchenco, who…