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Tracking the Lives of Nonstop Swimmers

How do you study an animal that never stops swimming? Find out how the Pristine Seas team is using technology to go along for the ride.

The ABCs of Ecosystem-Based Fisheries Management—Part II

Forage Fish: The Oceans’ Little Heroes Most Americans don’t think about fisheries policy when eating fish. But in fact, the supply of popular species such as cod, tuna, and salmon depends very much on how we manage them in the sea. If anglers, chefs, and diners want to continue catching, cooking, and eating fish, we…

Africa’s Submerged Savannas

Scientist Kike Ballesteros beautifully describes the diversity of Africa’s “Submberged Savannas” in this post from the Pristine Seas expedition in Mozambique.

Overfishing Remains Biggest Threat to Mediterranean, Study Confirms

Marine Ecologist Enric Sala says a new study produced by a dozen researchers confirms that the Mediterranean is on a trajectory to become a sea dominated by small tropical species that no one likes to eat. “Fishes will not be abundant, and the native species that the Greeks and Romans started to fish commercially will be rare — and most fisheries and the jobs they support will collapse,” he says. But this could change “if we stop all the irrational overfishing,” Sala adds, “including both legal and illegal fishing, and protect a large chunk of the Mediterranean. Without these radical changes, we’re just going to reduce the Mediterranean Sea to a soup of microbes and jellyfish.”

Sharks, Rays, and (Finally) a Break in the Weather

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The rough seas finally calm and the weather improves for the Pristine Seas team in Mozambique, and they move north into more tropical waters and the exciting marine life that dwell there.

Two National Marine Sanctuaries May More Than Double in Size

Two national marine sanctuaries along the Northern California coast, renown for their rich animal life, may more than double in size if NOAA has its way.

Here Today, Dugong Tomorrow!

The Pristine Seas dive team battles rough seas in this update from the expedition team in Mozambique.

Funny Video Takes on Plastic Pollution

As scientists debate how the world’s ocean might be picked free of plastic trash (hint: no one knows), a European nonprofit is taking on the problem with humor. The group Seas at Risk has just released the video above to remind people that what we do on land can have an impact on the ocean. Seas…

Diving Through Kelp With a Beautiful Giant

The Pristine Seas scientists explore a deep underwater kelp forest near Zavora Point in Mozambique, and are surprised by a giant-sized visitor during their surveys.

From Paper to Digital – The Mobile App Revolution

Its 3 a.m. in the morning and Ernest Gutierrez Jr. and his brother Derek, third generation fishermen from the island of St. Thomas, are sorting their catch. With only a few hours left before morning customers arrive, they still have their catch report to fill out –a lengthy paper form required by the Division of…

Debunking Captivity: 3 Reasons Not to Keep Dolphins in a Tank

By Maddalena Bearzi   I have spent much time in the company of wild dolphins over the last twenty-something years. I’ve built a career following their everyday movements and observing their behavior both from shore and from research boats. When I began my studies, I knew these creatures primarily as the objects of my research but,…

An Octopus Bite and a Visit From Mozambique’s Youngest Ocean Explorers

A group of young local underwater enthusiasts called the Nemos Pequenos inspire the Pristine Seas team with their interest and excitement, and an esteemed scientist is bitten by an octopus, in this update from Mozambique.

Bad Weather, Weird Parrot Fish Fact, and More

Bad weather puts the pressure on the team to get the day’s underwater surveys done, but there’s still time to relate a weird-but-true fact about where sand comes from.

Hōkūle‘a: The Dangers of Sailing Around the World

With only two months left before Hōkūle‘a leaves Hawai’i to sail around the world, crew members of the Polynesian Voyaging Society are rigorously training and planning for the challenges that lay ahead to ensure that this voyage will be safe and successful.

Singing Mozambican Fishermen Are the Perfect Alarm Clock

Shortly after dawn a small fleet of local fishing dhows sailed close to our anchorage, and as the men brought in the nets their happy work song was the most perfect alarm clock and an ideal start to the expedition’s first day of diving.