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Fisherman Rescues Drowning Eagle: Explaining Viral Video

Get the story behind how a young eagle ended up struggling in the water—and how it’s faring now.

Busting Indonesia’s Manta Gill Trade

This article is brought to you by the International League of Conservation Photographers (iLCP). Read our other articles on the National Geographic News Watch blog featuring the work of our iLCP Fellow Photographers all around the world. Text and photos by iLCP Fellow Paul Hilton. Writing this from a hotel room in Indonesia’s second-largest city, Surabaya, I realize…

As Expedition Ends, Scientists Can Crack Like Deep-Sea Rocks

The data collected on this trip about subduction zone origins will likely generate new models, and show that our planet is more complicated than previously thought. It’s challenging to sustain the energy levels exuded at the beginning, since writing reports, analyses, and daily seminars eventually look like a conveyor belt of never-ending goods. Turns out we all need variety in our day-to-day living; even scientists who love the idea of doing JUST research.

Can’t Top This

President Obama made history today in a BIG way. By expanding the Pacific Remote Islands Marine Monument to six times its original size, he created the largest area protected in the name of conservation ever.

The World Is Still Enormous

The world is still enormous, but imperiled. Like traditional navigators, we must see beyond our immediate surroundings to forge a better future.

Voyaging Reflection: Sources of Strength

Daniel Lin—Hōkūle’a crewmember, explorer, and photographer—reflects on one of the most important lessons he has learned while sailing on the Worldwide Voyage.

What’s That Weird Purple Sea Creature? Explaining Viral Video

A weird garbage-like creature spotted in the Gulf of Mexico is a rare type of jellyfish relative, scientists say.

Congress Needs to Think Big About Fish

When you buy a house, do you inspect only the roof? Of course not. You look at the whole structure: the foundation, insulation, plumbing, and many other aspects that indicate the overall condition of a home. Taking a look at the big picture is wise when buying a house—and equally wise when making many other…

Wild Ocean Spaces

Today, with a sense of urgency and some impressive partners, the National Geographic Society’s Pristine Seas project begins a bold new effort to save the last wild places in the oceans.

The Sea Turtle and the Captain

Captain Robert Thomas was fishing for Chinook salmon in the San Francisco Bay. His charter sport fishing boat, the Salty Lady, was near Buoy 1, just outside of the Golden Gate Bridge when they accidentally foul-hooked an endangered Pacific green sea turtle. Thomas has been fishing these waters for decades and though he has seen…

In Search of Svalbard Sea Monsters

Here be dragons! On the remote island of Spitsbergen, deep inside the Arctic circle, the remains of some of the most fearsome sea monsters to have prowled the oceans have been entombed in rock for more than 150,000,000 years. National Geographic Emerging Explorer Jørn Harald Hurum and his team have been excavating the fossils for many…

Ask Your Weird Animal Questions: Why Do Lobsters Turn Red When Cooked?

Are wood roaches different than cockroaches? Do killer whales usually attack in groups? See this week’s Ask Your Weird Animal Questions.

The Coral Triangle: Amazon of the Oceans

This article is brought to you by the International League of Conservation Photographers (iLCP). Read our other articles on the National Geographic News Watch blog featuring the work of our iLCP Fellow Photographers all around the world. Text and photos by iLCP Fellow James Morgan. I’ve been fortunate to see most of the world’s oceans the past couple…

Stayin’ Alive: Baby Mantis Shrimp Use Light to Stay Invisible

Young mantis shrimp that depend on transparent bodies to avoid predators, use reflectors in their eyes to make them invisible, according to a new study.

Following Nemo: Clownfish Make Epic Ocean Journeys

Turns out finding Nemo could take a while—a new study reveals for the first time that baby clownfish travel up to 250 miles in search of a new reef.