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Tracking the Lives of Nonstop Swimmers

How do you study an animal that never stops swimming? Find out how the Pristine Seas team is using technology to go along for the ride.

Africa’s Submerged Savannas

Scientist Kike Ballesteros beautifully describes the diversity of Africa’s “Submberged Savannas” in this post from the Pristine Seas expedition in Mozambique.

Sharks, Rays, and (Finally) a Break in the Weather

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The rough seas finally calm and the weather improves for the Pristine Seas team in Mozambique, and they move north into more tropical waters and the exciting marine life that dwell there.

Top 25 Wild Bird Photographs of the Week #65

We cannot overstate the dedication of wild bird photographers around the world. Birds are extremely risk-averse and getting close is a time-earned skill born of years learning about their behaviour. Knowledge of your camera is essential with no room for error before this bird takes off. The wild bird photographs in this week’s collection are…

Here Today, Dugong Tomorrow!

The Pristine Seas dive team battles rough seas in this update from the expedition team in Mozambique.

On the Trail of a Puma

After seeing pumas, their tracks, and their kills all week, we started catching them. Now five of San Guillermo’s pumas are wearing satellite collars that will show us what they’re killing, where, and how – giving us a new window into the workings of high Andean ecosystems.

Top 10 Photos of Adventure Science on the American Prairie

Landmark is the groundbreaking project that Adventurers and Scientists for Conservation has undertaken in conjunction with American Prairie Reserve (APR) to provide “boots on the ground” support for the conservation management team at APR. Landmark crews spend 1-3 month-long stints on the reserve participating in all aspects of wildlife conservation research on foot, ski and bike giving them a…

Grey Wolf Captured On Camera

Diving Through Kelp With a Beautiful Giant

The Pristine Seas scientists explore a deep underwater kelp forest near Zavora Point in Mozambique, and are surprised by a giant-sized visitor during their surveys.

Recent Anniversary and Death Highlights Continued Struggle of “The Erased”

National Geographic grantee Riley Arthur is documenting the Erased of Slovenia- 25,000+ non-ethnic Slovenian residents were left without legal status after the country split from Yugoslavia in 1991. Over two decades later, the community is still fighting for documentation. These stories are about the Erased and the places they live.  —- February 26th, 2014 marked…

Video: In Search of Wolverine

NG Explorer Gregg Treinsh teamed up recently with scientists and adventurers to collect DNA samples from tracks and scat of wolverines in a remote region of Mongolia. Experience the sights, sounds, and reflections of the team on the expedition.

Special Squeaky Sloth Video

National Geograpic Emerging Explorer Lucy Cooke, creator of Slothville, is on a one-woman crusade to show the world why some of the most unlovable animals are actually the most interesting and deserving of our attention, study, and protection. Her new book, The Little Book of Sloth, celebrates the sloth: the cutest, cuddliest, slowest creature on…

Pumas in the Rocks, Pumas in the Grass

At San Guillermo, pumas stalk through the grasses and canyons, looking to kill. But vicuñas need to go to those very places for food and water. It’s like Russian roulette – but they do it every single day.

Bug-Catching: It Ain’t Easy

National Geographic grantee Nik Tatarnic is taking a closer look at the traumatic sex lives of Tahiti’s tiny bugs. Follow Nik’s expedition on Explorers Journal as he investigates the bizarre sexuality of the genus known as Coridromius. —- Well, it’s been 10 days in Tahiti and things have been pretty hectic. We’ve circumnavigated the island several times, ascended…

Trekking in the Footsteps of a Lone Wolf for Coexistence

In late 2011, a lone wolf walked across Oregon and entered California, becoming the first wild wolf in the state in nearly 90 years.

He was called a hero, a killing-machine, a rogue, a beacon of hope, a foreign invader from Canada, and school children named him Journey. No matter his name, he came to represent the return of wolves to their historic rangelands in the American Pacific Northwest.