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Africa’s Illegal Charcoal Trade Engulfs Cheetah Habitat

In rural northern Tanzania, an African country famous for charismatic megafauna, including free-roaming cheetah and other big cats, impoverished and under-employed Swahili villagers struggle to survive. One way to earn money and make cooking fuel is to cut forests for wood that can be turned into charcoal. It’s an economic and environmental disaster, illegal because it is not sustainable for either wildlife or people. Meet the team that is looking for new ways to create livelihoods while teaching villagers the importance of protecting their natural wealth.

On the Trail of a Puma

After seeing pumas, their tracks, and their kills all week, we started catching them. Now five of San Guillermo’s pumas are wearing satellite collars that will show us what they’re killing, where, and how – giving us a new window into the workings of high Andean ecosystems.

Inside Tiger Farming: A Long Chain of Profiteers

Swiss-born journalist and wildlife activist Karl Ammann has been investigating the illegal trade in wildlife products in Africa and Southeast Asia for 30 years. In this blog post, he discusses what he documented with hidden cameras while investigating the booming Asian trade in tiger parts. Ammann’s findings were aired on Spiegel Television in Germany and…

Dying in a Living Room: The Illegal Live Cheetah Trade

Wildlife trafficking has become one of the major conservation issues of our time and the sinister illegal trade in cheetahs is increasingly coming to the attention of conservationists. Unlike leopards, the main trade in cheetahs is not a consequence of the desire for beautiful spotted skins to decorate the house, nor is it a response…

Why Have Tigers Been Feared and Revered Throughout History?

Talking Tigers: Part 5 of a 12-part series Throughout human history, the diverse peoples who populated the vast Asian continent have had one thing in common: They feared and revered the tiger. Throughout this cat’s range, their stealthy, illusory habits—suddenly appearing and disappearing in dense forests, often at night—elevated them to the status of otherworldly beings.…

Why Do Adult Cougars Kill Each Other?

F51, an adult female mountain lion currently tracked by Panthera’s Teton Cougar Project, meandered towards the eastern edge of her range, her two female offspring bouncing like electrons in orbit around her. Who can say what a mountain lion thinks, but from our perspective, life seemed good for F51. The family had fed off a…

Baby Baboon’s Frightening Encounter with Lions Ends with a Heroic Twist

Witness this remarkable interaction between a baby baboon, a lioness, and the heroic acts of the father baboon that follow.

Uncharted Territory for Gorongosa’s Lions

The Cheringoma Plateau on the eastern boundary of Gorongosa National Park is a stronghold of biodiversity and until recently largely unexplored, particularly for large carnivores. In April of 2013 Projecto Leões joined an expedition to document biodiversity on the Plateau. During the survey a team of 15 leading scientists yielded 1,200 species, of which 500 are…

A Concise History of Tiger Hunting in India

In part four of a 12-part series, author Sharon Guynup explains the varied history of tiger conservation in India.

Frozen Food: Winter Woes for Cougars

It was dark, and cold. Under cover of night, F61, an adult female mountain lion currently followed by Panthera’s Teton Cougar Project, padded softly back to her kill. Drew Rush, on assignment for National Geographic’s article “Ghost Cats” had visited while she was away, and set up a motion-triggered camera to photograph her upon her…

Counting Tigers by Their Stripes

Tigers are secretive by nature, making it difficult to estimate their populations in the wild. But Dr. K. Ullas Karanth of the Wildlife Conservation Society employs an ingenious solution: he uses remote “camera traps” to photograph unsuspecting tigers and identifies them later by their unique stripe patterns. As a result, he has helped develop a more reliable way to count — and protect — tigers in India’s Western Ghats.

Rare Video Footage Shows the Dynamics of Cougar Courtship

How cougars find each other in a vast landscape of mountains, raging water, thick forests, and rocky bluffs is one of life’s great mysteries for those of us who study mountain lions. I’ve spent many long hours contemplating this subject, and here’s what I’ve decided: it might be easier than we think. I’m speculating here,…

Kids in India Come Together to Save Tigers

In part three of a 12-part tiger series, Steve Winter and Sharon Guynup learn about an organization that’s encouraging kids to care about tigers and the environment.

Discovery of First Pallas’ Cat in Nepal

By Bikram Shrestha. Exciting camera trap images from our Nepal team shows Pallas’ cats, otherwise known as Manul, are living in Nepal!  Even though they live in grassland and mountain steppe areas throughout Asia, until these images were taken, presence of the Pallas’ cat in Nepal was never suspected or even thought about.  In fact, there…

Illegal Tiger Trade: Why Tigers Are Walking Gold

In part two of a 12-part series, Sharon Guynup and Steve Winter investigate one of the most devastating threats facing the world’s last 3,000 wild tigers: poaching.