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Stuart Pimm

of Nicholas School, Duke University

www.savingspecies.org

Stuart Pimm is the Doris Duke Chair of Conservation Ecology at the Nicholas School of the Environment at Duke University. He is a world leader in the study of present day extinctions and what we can do to prevent them. Pimm received his BSc degree from Oxford University in 1971 and his Ph.D from New Mexico State University in 1974. Pimm is the author of nearly 300 scientific papers and four books. He is one of the most highly cited environmental scientists.
Pimm wrote the highly acclaimed assessment of the human impact to the planet: The World According to Pimm: a Scientist Audits the Earth in 2001. His commitment to the interface between science and policy has led to his testimony to both House and Senate Committees on the re-authorization of the Endangered Species Act. He has served on National Geographic’s Committee for Research and Exploration and currently works with their Big Cats Initiative. In addition to his studies in Africa, Pimm has worked in the wet forests of Colombia, Ecuador and Brazil for decades and is a long-term collaborator of the forest fragmentation project north of Manaus, Brazil.
Pimm directs SavingSpecies, a 501c3 non-profit that uses funds for carbon emissions offsets to fund local conservation groups to restore degraded lands in areas of exceptional tropical biodiversity.
His international honours include the Tyler Prize for Environmental Achievement (2010), the Dr. A.H. Heineken Prize for Environmental Sciences from the Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences (2006).

Saving a Darwin’s Finch from Extinction

By Dr. Sarah Knutie The fate of many bird species is uncertain. Those the authorities classify as “critically endangered” especially so. Only exceptional conservation measures can save them. While habitat destruction is a major cause of extinction, introduced species are a most serious threat—and one that we are usually completely helpless to control. One of…

Discovery of First Pallas’ Cat in Nepal

By Bikram Shrestha. Exciting camera trap images from our Nepal team shows Pallas’ cats, otherwise known as Manul, are living in Nepal!  Even though they live in grassland and mountain steppe areas throughout Asia, until these images were taken, presence of the Pallas’ cat in Nepal was never suspected or even thought about.  In fact, there…

Drama in the Mara!

By Anne Kent Taylor   “As in human populations, territorial  ”punch-ups” frequently occur in the Animal Kingdom.   On January 17th, 2014 , in Kenya’s Masai Mara,  two lion prides tangled over their territorial rights, and a kill, resulting in one three month old cub becoming separated from her mother and pride.  One would assume that…

Canada’s Boreal Forests — Now Cold, Dark, And In Need Of Our Care

On this almost shortest day of the year when children worldwide are thinking of Santa and the North Pole, I’ve been thinking about the now bitterly cold ecosystems somewhat to the south of him, but very much further north than most of us! I could not escape doing so, because last month, I was invited…

Emptying the Desert

By Dr. Sarah Durant, Zoological Society of London, Wildlife Conservation Society, and National Geographic’s Big Cats Initiative There are few landscapes more evocative and beautiful than the sweeping sands and majestic mountains of the Sahara desert. This land used to be widely populated by large animals uniquely adapted to the harsh and unpredictable desert environment. Their…

Science warns against drilling the most biodiverse rainforest on Earth

By Matt Finer  The Ecuadorian government is currently racing ahead with plans to drill for oil in the core of what is arguably the most biodiverse corner of the planet: Blocks 31 and ITT of the famed Yasuní National Park. This new aggressive push for oil drilling comes as a stunning backlash to the failure…

Sleeping with your cat.

Photo  Stuart Pimm Or — what’s a girl to do, when it’s a male lion and it’s becoming too friendly? Yes, I know who you are, out there reading this blog.  Cat lovers.  You think heaven is when your cats — and you probably have more than one of them — are curled up on…

Dare We Follow the Tiger’s Footsteps?

 By Zoe Jewell & Sky Alibhai, WildTrack Identifying individual tigers from their paw prints has been controversial.  Exciting new methods combine field work and cutting edge statistics from the software giant JMP to show how it can be done.   The majestic and enigmatic tiger – arguably our planet’s most iconic animal and the favourite subject…

Citizen Divers Enlisted in Conservation Study of Sea Turtles And Sharks at Cocos Island National Park, the “Most Beautiful Island in the World”

BY TODD STEINER   (c) Shmulik Blum, DeepSEE   Jacques Cousteau called Cocos Island “the most beautiful in the world.”  Located about halfway between Costa Rica and Ecuador’s Galapagos Islands, it is the only island in the eastern Pacific Ocean supporting tropical rainforest. With peaks as high as 2,000 feet, it is also the only one…

Historical data suggests Hawaiian sea turtle recovery is limited

Two green turtles basking.  Courtesy Mark Sully, NOAA/NMFS Hawaii Monk Seal Research Program. Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument. Hawaii is famous for its tranquil beaches, surfing, and for pairing pineapple with pizza. But it is Hawaii’s green sea turtles that are one of the most popular tourist draws today. Hundreds of thousands of tourists trek to…

Oil and gas development does not have to destroy the Amazon

NGS Grantee, Dr. Clinton Jenkins stands amid felled trees in Peru. Logging is a familiar threat to the Amazon, but not the only one.  When one thinks of the Amazon, it is usually of lush rainforests or indigenous people living amongst a wild landscape. Certainly, that is part of the Amazon’s story, but there is…

LION LIGHTS — a home grown solution to saving lions and livestock

Paula Kahumbu, National Geographic grantee and Buffet Prize winner, writes about an innovative solution to save lions.  It’s originator is 13 year old Richard Turere. Family portrait of lioness and her cubs, Nairobi National Park,  Stuart Pimm. Lions, once ubiquitous in Africa and Asia are now in big trouble of going extinct in the wild.…

Lions Saved from Poisoning in Tanzania’s Maasai Steppe

Warriors for Wildlife Elvis Kisimir (right) and assistant Lomoni Ndooki. Photograph by Dr. Laly Lichtenfeld Dr. Laly Lichtenfeld is a National Geographic grantee through the Big Cats Initiative. She writes from Tanzania: (PLEASE NOTE:  This post contains some graphic images.) Warriors for Wildlife are young Maasai men selected and trained by the African People and Wildlife…

Watching Wild Snow Leopards

By Darla Hillard Education Director, Snow Leopard Conservancy Photo © John Merjanian:  Wild snow leopard observed in Ladakh, northern India by members of the Wintertime Quest for the Snow Leopard Stuart writes:  After Darla posted an earlier story, I begged her to do another to include a video clip of a young snow leopard playing with…

Nepalese Teenagers become Citizen Monitors for Snow Leopard Conservation

By Darla Hillard Photo: Snow leopard captured by student-herder team in Nepal’s remote Himalaya   High in the Nepalese Himalaya, teenage students are monitoring wildlife in their community. They have made a surprising discovery. Dr. Som Ale, Regional Director with the Dr. Som Ale, Regional Director with the Snow Leopard Conservancy has been leading an effort…