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Stuart Pimm

of Nicholas School, Duke University

www.savingspecies.org

Stuart Pimm is the Doris Duke Chair of Conservation Ecology at the Nicholas School of the Environment at Duke University. He is a world leader in the study of present day extinctions and what we can do to prevent them. Pimm received his BSc degree from Oxford University in 1971 and his Ph.D from New Mexico State University in 1974. Pimm is the author of nearly 300 scientific papers and four books. He is one of the most highly cited environmental scientists.
Pimm wrote the highly acclaimed assessment of the human impact to the planet: The World According to Pimm: a Scientist Audits the Earth in 2001. His commitment to the interface between science and policy has led to his testimony to both House and Senate Committees on the re-authorization of the Endangered Species Act. He has served on National Geographic’s Committee for Research and Exploration and currently works with their Big Cats Initiative. In addition to his studies in Africa, Pimm has worked in the wet forests of Colombia, Ecuador and Brazil for decades and is a long-term collaborator of the forest fragmentation project north of Manaus, Brazil.
Pimm directs SavingSpecies, a 501c3 non-profit that uses funds for carbon emissions offsets to fund local conservation groups to restore degraded lands in areas of exceptional tropical biodiversity.
His international honours include the Tyler Prize for Environmental Achievement (2010), the Dr. A.H. Heineken Prize for Environmental Sciences from the Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences (2006).

Roads Benefit People But Can Have Massive Environmental Costs

Road-killed tapir in Peninsular Malaysia (photo © WWF-Malaysia/Lau Ching Fong) By William F. Laurance Located in the wrong places, roads can open a Pandora’s Box of problems, says William F. Laurance In a recent Opinion in National Geographic News (“Want to make a dent in world hunger? Build better roads”, 14 October 2014), U.S. Ambassador Kenneth…

Putin’s Tiger – Caught in the Act!

By Zoe Jewell of Wildtrack  Last week Vladimir Putin released Kuzya, complete with electronic tracking device, but forgot to tell her she was to stay in Russia. Shortly after she swam across the freezing Amur river into China where she stopped for supper at a Chinese chicken farm take-away.  She left nothing but a few…

Livestock Guarding Dogs in Southern Africa

Given the number of comments about my blog on the effectiveness of guard dogs in protecting livestock, I asked Jane Horgan, NGS Big Cats Initiative grantee to respond.  Here’s what Jane has written. Stuart Pimm Jane Horgan: Thank you all for your comments. This author is referring to programs run by NGOs throughout southern Africa as…

Face-to-Face Conservation

“The phone calls always seem to be on a Sunday and 1000 kilometres (600 miles) away from here” Florian Weise tells me. We’re standing next to a huge drum of diesel — “this is where the NGS Big Cats Initiative money went” he explains, filling up his pick-up for the long journey. Florian’s insights into…

I Recognise the Cheetah by its Paw

Nothing quite excites the imagination than going for an early morning’s walk and seeing the paw prints of lions along the road from the previous night’s hunt. How many of them are they? How far away might they be? Who are they? Are they still hungry? Will I live to eat breakfast? Now, spend time…

Moving Cheetahs out of Danger

By Florian Weise,  N/a’an ku sê Carnivore Conservation Research Project, Namibia and National Geographic Big Cats Initiative grantee.   Last week a livestock farmer called to report a cheetah caught in a trap. He won’t release the animal on site — it will kill his livestock. But knowing about the species’ imperiled status he does…

A Woman and Her Dogs

The Kalahari — the word means “waterless” — stretches across the area equal to that spanned by the eight US states that stretch from Idaho and Montana, southwards to Arizona and New Mexico. Our winter journey across the monotonous dry savannah of yellow grass and green acacia trees takes days. For our second visit to…

B is for Boma, K is for Kraal

I’m just south of the Zambezi river, in the Caprivi, the long eastern panhandle of Namibia that stretches from the Okavango River to Victoria falls. Angola and Zambia are only 40 miles away to the north, Botswana 10 to the south, and Zimbabwe less than 150 to the east. It’s certainly Africa’s most geographically complicated…

Saving a Darwin’s Finch from Extinction

By Dr. Sarah Knutie The fate of many bird species is uncertain. Those the authorities classify as “critically endangered” especially so. Only exceptional conservation measures can save them. While habitat destruction is a major cause of extinction, introduced species are a most serious threat—and one that we are usually completely helpless to control. One of…

Discovery of First Pallas’ Cat in Nepal

By Bikram Shrestha. Exciting camera trap images from our Nepal team shows Pallas’ cats, otherwise known as Manul, are living in Nepal!  Even though they live in grassland and mountain steppe areas throughout Asia, until these images were taken, presence of the Pallas’ cat in Nepal was never suspected or even thought about.  In fact, there…

Drama in the Mara!

By Anne Kent Taylor   “As in human populations, territorial  “punch-ups” frequently occur in the Animal Kingdom.   On January 17th, 2014 , in Kenya’s Masai Mara,  two lion prides tangled over their territorial rights, and a kill, resulting in one three month old cub becoming separated from her mother and pride.  One would assume that…

Canada’s Boreal Forests — Now Cold, Dark, And In Need Of Our Care

On this almost shortest day of the year when children worldwide are thinking of Santa and the North Pole, I’ve been thinking about the now bitterly cold ecosystems somewhat to the south of him, but very much further north than most of us! I could not escape doing so, because last month, I was invited…

Emptying the Desert

By Dr. Sarah Durant, Zoological Society of London, Wildlife Conservation Society, and National Geographic’s Big Cats Initiative There are few landscapes more evocative and beautiful than the sweeping sands and majestic mountains of the Sahara desert. This land used to be widely populated by large animals uniquely adapted to the harsh and unpredictable desert environment. Their…

Science warns against drilling the most biodiverse rainforest on Earth

By Matt Finer  The Ecuadorian government is currently racing ahead with plans to drill for oil in the core of what is arguably the most biodiverse corner of the planet: Blocks 31 and ITT of the famed Yasuní National Park. This new aggressive push for oil drilling comes as a stunning backlash to the failure…

Sleeping with your cat.

Photo  Stuart Pimm Or — what’s a girl to do, when it’s a male lion and it’s becoming too friendly? Yes, I know who you are, out there reading this blog.  Cat lovers.  You think heaven is when your cats — and you probably have more than one of them — are curled up on…