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Wildlife Conservation Society

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The Wildlife Conservation Society saves wildlife and wild places worldwide. We do so through science, global conservation, education and the management of the world's largest system of urban wildlife parks, led by the flagship Bronx Zoo. Together these activities change attitudes toward nature and help people imagine wildlife and humans living in harmony. WCS is committed to this mission because it is essential to the integrity of life on Earth.

America Resilient

Since we last celebrated Earth Day a year ago, 29 states have experienced 99 Federal disaster declarations. Fires, floods, mudslides, hurricanes, and tornadoes have devastated the United States, causing billions of dollars of damage, destroying thousands of homes, and up-ending people’s lives.

Equality for Women and Sustainable Development Go Hand in Hand

Half of the world’s farmers are women, but women only own about one percent of the world’s land. Similarly, women make up nearly 50 percent of the global fisheries workforce, but in most countries have little to no say in how fisheries are managed. These statistics are indicative of a more general trend: women’s interests and roles are seldom seriously considered in the design and implementation of rural development and conservation initiatives.

European Union Fisheries Ban Ignores Belize Conservation Success Story

In its coastal fisheries, Belize is leading the way in innovative management strategies designed to preserve biodiversity in a manner that keeps fishermen on the water and focused on the long-term sustainability of fish stocks. Future generations of Belizeans will be able to carry on their rich fishing traditions thanks to the decisions, at times quite difficult, being made right now.

Why Adoption of the Medical Model Would Cure Conservation Impact Evaluation

Whether it is using scuba and snorkel surveys to track changes in coral reef health, systematic ranger and ecoguard patrolling to enforce wildlife laws and prevent crime, expert opinion interviews to assess strengths and weakness of natural resource governance, or household surveys to measure the livelihoods of families who share the landscapes in which we work, increasingly conservation organizations are committed to ensuring we measure what we manage.

This Week in London: Uniting to End the Scourge of Illegal Wildlife Trafficking

The international trade in parts and products of wild animals is worth more than $150 billion per year. Yes, billions. International illegal wildlife trade is considered by some experts to be the fourth largest illegal trade in the world (after drugs, weapons, and human trafficking). It involves animals and plants used for collectibles, food, pets, ornaments, curios, leathers, medicines, and cosmetics. It includes tens of millions of wild mammals, reptiles, birds, fish, and other species.

Alberta’s Heritage of Wildlife and Headwaters Up for Grabs

Many important areas would remain un-protected in the Alberta government’s draft Regional Plan, which would establish new Wildland Parks in about 25% of the area. In fact, the government’s proposed parks would cover only a small portion of each species’ vital habitat. Several of the more productive habitats along the upper river valleys and higher tributaries would be excluded from protection.

Path of the Pronghorn — Leading to New Passages: Part 3

For more than a decade, scientists from the Wildlife Conservation Society have conducted research and worked with partners to protect pronghorn migration to and from Grand Teton National Park along a more than 100-mile long migration corridor known as the Path of the Pronghorn. The animals migrate along this corridor between summer range in and around Grand Teton National Park and winter range in the Upper Green River Valley south of Trapper’s Point in western Wyoming. If this migration corridor is severed, pronghorn will be lost from Grand Teton National Park.

On Wildlife Conservation Day: Saving Our Last Wild Places

Human society clearly wants raw materials to fuel economies of sufficient size to meet the needs of what will soon be nine billion people. Yet promoting the disturbance and degradation of the few places on the planet that remain intact and most resilient to climate change is, at the very least, short sighted.

Rare Video Captures Tiger Making Its Kill

By K. Ullas Karanth, Director for Science-Asia at the Wildlife Conservation Society Tigers are the largest of all living wildcats. Over the course of two million years, nature fine-tuned them as master predators through a trial-and-error process we call Darwinian evolution. Hunting alone, a tiger can take down prey four to five times its own…

Marking the 100-year Anniversary of Historic Transfer of Bison from the Bronx Zoo to Wind Cave National Park

By John Calvelli  [Note: This is the fifth in a series of blogs by Calvelli celebrating the history and conservation of the American Bison.] This Thanksgiving, we celebrate a great milestone for both bison and the modern conservation movement. November 28 marks the 100th anniversary of the transfer and restocking of 14 bison from the…

Honoring an American Icon with National Bison Day

On October 30, 2013, the U.S. Senate passed, by unanimous consent, a resolution officially designating November 2, 2013, as National Bison Day. The resolution earned the bipartisan support of 25 Senators – representing a quarter of the U.S. Senate. In passing the resolution, Democratic and Republican leaders have teamed up with close to 50 diverse groups in an initiative called the Vote Bison Coalition. The group represents bison producers, Native Americans, conservationists, educational institutions, recreationists, zoological institutions, health organizations, and businesses.

World Food Day: A Time to Embrace the Farming We Want

With the support of policy makers, opinion leaders, scientists, business leaders and the public, we can make “the farming we want” a reality in order to grow sufficient, nutritious food for future generations, to bring new prosperity to the countryside, and to make this planet a more diverse – and safer – home for all the species that dwell here.

REDD+ Can Be a Game-Changer in the Battle Against Tropical Deforestation

In a high profile side event to the UN General Assembly next week, UN agencies, NGOs and the private sector will gather at the Wildlife Conservation Society’s Bronx Zoo to celebrate recent successes in forest protection to combat climate change and call for much greater future investment.

Counting the Tigers That You Cannot See

Pollsters say tigers are the most popular animal species on this planet. Unfortunately, they are also among the most threatened. Wildlife biologists like me struggle to monitor the fate of surviving tiger populations.

Let’s Not Shatter the Glass Eel

With the exception of sushi aficionados devouring unagi in rolls of avocado, rice, and a dab of wasabi, American eels do not get a lot of love today. Once a dietary mainstay of native peoples and early colonists, these nutritious animals have been devastated over the centuries by growing fishing pressure and the construction of dams along rivers where they once swam in abundance.