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Samantha Blee

Coal & Climate: Ask Your Questions About Environmental Science

We burn eight million tons of coal—the dirtiest of fossil fuels—each year, and the consequences are growing. In the April issue of National Geographic magazine, we asked the question: Can coal ever be clean? What are your thoughts about clean energy? How about freshwater or the growing global population? Do you have questions about oil spills, the…

Twitter Chat With Anne Barnard

New York Times Beirut bureau chief Anne Barnard covers the Middle East and has witnessed firsthand the changes that are taking place in Damascus, a city that has been affected by the chaos of war. And we’re giving you the chance to ask her questions about her experience. In her feature “Syria: The Chaos of War”…

Join a Live Twitter Chat With Health Expert Dr. Tieraona Low Dog

Are you ready to take charge of your health? In her new National Geographic book Healthy at Home: Get Well and Stay Well Without Prescriptions, Dr. Tieraona Low Dog guides you through the art and science of healing at home. Whether you’re learning how to keep a calm persona or make your own herbal remedies, Dr. Low Dog…

Ask Your Science Questions on Twitter

Ever wonder how the voice of that radio announcer makes it through your alarm clock in the morning? Or how the remote control opens your garage door? How about what antibiotics really do? National Geographic’s book, Science of Everything, answers those nagging questions about how things work. With a forward written by former New York…

Gathering Irish Genes

The Emerald Isle is calling her people home for a celebration of all things Irish in a year-long program and National Geographic’s Genographic Project couldn’t help but get in on the action.

Explorer of the Week: Becca Skinner

When photographer Becca Skinner was nine years old, a friend told her to give up on her dream of shooting for National Geographic. Despite her friend’s advice, Skinner achieved that dream with a Young Explorers grant that allowed her to document the post-conflict society of Banda Aceh, Sumatra—a province effected by the 2004 tsunami. What…

Explorer of the Week: Todd Pierson

Biologist Todd Pierson wants to live in a world with great amphibian and reptile diversity, and he’s going to do his best to make that happen. He’s currently studying Appalachian salamanders, but has encountered all kinds of interesting reptiles in the field—including a 60-pound alligator snapping turtle. What project are you working on now?  Right…

Explorer of the Week: Kendra Chritz

What exactly does a paleoecologist do? While nearly stepping on carpet vipers, getting caught in riots, and dashing past fresh crocodile nests might not immediately come to mind, Kendra Chritz has encountered all of these situations in the field. A fascination for the world inspires Chritz to work towards understanding what the planet looked like…

Explorer of the Week: Andy Maser

When Washington’s Condit Dam became the largest dam ever removed, Andy Maser was there to witness the demolition. While out in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Maser was pinned down by AK47-wielding rebel fighters. And while spending time in an Alaskan stream, the Young Explorer‘s fingers became too numb to zip his dry suit.…

Explorer of the Week: Alton Byers

 At age 21, geographer Alton Byers thought to himself, “Wouldn’t it be cool if one could become a mountain geographer, studying mountains, mountain people, and conservation as a career?” His resulting work as a “climbing scientist” has allowed him to establish new national parks, protect a mountain species, and help people reduce the risk of…

Explorer of the Week: Eric Patterson

Biologist Eric Patterson always knew he wanted a career that allowed him to work with animals. Today, this fascination brings him everywhere from the National Aquarium in Baltimore to Australia’s Shark Bay. Patterson studies dolphin behavior—most recently, their use of sponge tools. And while his subjects share many similar traits to humans, they always find…

Explorer of the Week: Brendan Buzzard

Where do we all belong? How do we as individuals and species fit into the spaces of the world? These are questions that fascinate conservationist Brendan Buzzard, whether he’s following a herd of elephants in the desert or simply sitting at his desk writing an essay. Growing up in Southern and East Africa set Buzzard…