National Geographic
Menu

At Shedd Aquarium, animals connect you to the living world, inspiring you to make a difference.

Citizen Scientists Make Lasting Contributions to Iguana Research and Conservation

Guest post by Rebecca Gericke, conservation and research programs manager, Shedd Aquarium    Comprised of over 700 islands, cays and rocks, the Bahamas is largely considered a maritime nation. When you think of the Bahamas, you may picture clear blue water, endless white sand beaches and pristine coral reefs teeming with colorful marine life, but the…

Year of the Horse Kicks Off with Seahorse Conservation

Dr. Tse-Lynn Loh, Postdoctoral Research Associate John G. Shedd Aquarium, Chicago in partnership with Project Seahorse (University of British Columbia & Zoological Society of London) I’m writing from foggy and drizzly Haiphong, where I’ve been meeting with our country hosts at the Research Institute for Marine Fisheries (RIMF) and organizing the logistics for the next…

Lending a Helping Hand to Rescue African Penguin Chicks in South Africa

Guest Blog by Tim Binder, VP of Collection Planning at Shedd Aquarium As a nationally recognized leader in rescue and rehabilitation work, Shedd Aquarium has responded to animals in need for over two decades. Whether it’s providing around-the-clock care for Cayucos, one of our rescued sea otter pups, or serving as an active responder in times…

Four Conservation Experts Look Back on and Beyond 40 Years of the Endangered Species Act

Since the Endangered Species Act (ESA) was signed by President Nixon on Dec. 28, 1973, the Act has helped recover more than 30 species, prevented the extinction of 99 percent of the species it protects and currently protects more than 2,140 species. Conservation and learning at accredited zoos and aquariums, in partnership with local and…

Scenes from the Philippines: Post-earthquake, Post-typhoon

Guest blog by Dr. Amanda Vincent, Director and Co-founder of Project Seahorse  It’s been an incredibly difficult few weeks for the central Philippines. Following a 7.2 magnitude earthquake last month that caused considerable loss of lives and homes, the Visayas region was hit on Nov. 7th by Typhoon Haiyan (a.k.a. Yolanda), one of the very strongest…

The Mystery of the Migrating Fishes: Swimming the Gauntlet to Green Bay

  Dr. Solomon David, Postdoctoral Research Associate Daniel P. Haerther Center for Conservation & Research, Shedd Aquarium Center for Limnology, University of Wisconsin-Madison The ice and snow of early spring in northern Wisconsin had come and gone. Also departing with the frigid weather were the adult northern pike our team had been tracking as the fish…

Studying Shark Stress

Dr. Lisa Naples John G. Shedd Aquarium As Shark Week wraps up, let’s consider the vulnerable side of these ancient species. To many people, sharks seem to be the toughest animals in the ocean—but these top predators are prone to the same physical problem that many of us experience: stress. It’s often said that stress…

The Mystery of the Migrating Fishes: Northern Adventures in the Great Lakes

Dr. Solomon David, Postdoctoral Research Associate Daniel P. Haerther Center for Conservation & Research, Shedd Aquarium Center for Limnology, University of Wisconsin-Madison I had received word from colleagues that northern pike (Esox lucius), an apex predator in freshwaters throughout the northern hemisphere, had begun migrating inland from Lake Michigan, and I had come to track…

Iguana Research on Gaulin Cay, Bahamas

The final installment in a series of posts by Chicago area college students enrolled in the John G. Shedd Aquarium’s Marine and Island Ecology course offered through the Associated Colleges of the Chicago Area (ACCA). Our students work closely with Shedd staff through both field work and onsite classes. At the end of the course,…

Searching for Seahorses

Dr. Tse-Lynn Loh, Postdoctoral Research Associate John G. Shedd Aquarium, Chicago in partnership with Project Seahorse (University of British Columbia & Zoological Society of London) The wind blew steadily, whipping up whitecaps in the distance as our little long-tail boat made its way out of Panwa Bay, at the southeastern corner of Phuket, Thailand. My…

Analyzing Seagrass Beds in the Bahamas: Diving into Field Research with Shedd Aquarium

The second installment in a series of posts by Chicago area college students enrolled in the John G. Shedd Aquarium’s Marine and Island Ecology course offered through the Associated Colleges of the Chicago Area (ACCA). Our students work closely with Shedd staff through both field work and onsite classes. At the end of the course,…

Studying white-tailed tropicbirds in the Bahamas

Shedd Aquarium has been involved with conservation, education and research projects in the Bahamas for more than 20 years. These projects rely on volunteer and student participation. Every spring, Chicago area college students have a unique opportunity to participate in Shedd’s Marine and Island Ecology course offered through the Associated Colleges of the Chicago Area…

Can iguanas swim, and what would it mean for conservation?

Charles Knapp, Vice President of Conservation and Research John G. Shedd Aquarium, Chicago, Illinois USA   Last week, you learned about how Shedd Aquarium’s long-term citizen science research program is helping to save endangered iguanas in the Bahamas. This week, we’ll explore another facet of our 2013 trip: an effort to understand whether the Andros…

Commitment to conservation creates lasting memories

Imagine visiting the subtropical paradise of The Bahamas. Instead of holding a drink, you’re grasping a net. Instead of sand between your toes, you’re navigating sharp limestone in boots. Instead of admiring beautiful sunsets, you’re searching for beautiful iguanas. You can find drinks, sand, and sunsets in many destinations, but if you’re part of Shedd…

Low Lake Levels: Don’t Fight Nature, Plan for It

The Great Lakes hold 20 percent of the world’s available surface freshwater–enough to cover the continental United States with 10 feet of water if you turned them upside down. In many places along the lakes, you can stand on one side without seeing the shoreline on the other because they are so huge. It’s difficult…