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Lauren Ward

of NG Staff

BioBlitz Comes to San Francisco

Over 300 scientists reported for duty Friday morning, March 28th for a 24-hour species count at San Francisco’s Golden Gate National Parks. The event, known as BioBlitz, brings together local scientists and members of the community to survey a new national park each year. This year, the National Geographic-National Park Service partnership celebrates its 8th…

Hangout With an Astronaut: Ask Your Questions

Since the year of mankind’s inaugural trip to space in 1961, 341 people have crossed the celestial borders of outer space. These new-age navigators represent the pinnacle of human achievement. What is it about their daring voyages that elicit wonderment in those watching from Earth? Becoming an astronaut is a difficult, but not impossible dream. Join us for our next Google+ Hangout to discover one astronaut’s path to becoming a crew member on the International Space Station.

Google+ Hangout: Saving the Ocean’s Amazing Creatures

Live now! Join the conversation with National Geographic explorers of the ocean!

Hangout With Hi-Tech Explorers

Join us for our next Google+ Hangout as we explore the cutting-edge technology that allows us to perceive the formerly unseen.

Giving to Something Bigger Than Ourselves on #GivingTuesday

National Geographic welcomes Giving Tuesday and its powerful message about the importance of giving back. Help give the next generation a better planet by supporting our mission today. Your donation will support grantees and explorers who are working to preserve species and habitats, protect cultures, and advance understanding of our world.

Give Back to the Ocean on #GivingTuesday

National Geographic welcomes Giving Tuesday and its powerful message about the importance of giving back. Help give the next generation a better planet by supporting our mission today. Your donation will support society-wide initiatives like the Ocean Initiative, National Geographic’s ocean program to help identify and support individuals and organizations that are using creative and entrepreneurial approaches to marine conservation.

Boone Smith and the Art of Capture

Boone Smith has big cat tracking in his blood. Born into a family of Idaho houndsmen with a legacy of big cat capture, he embodies generations of knowledge passed down from father to son.

The Patient Photography of Steve Winter

Think several hours is a long time to wait for a photo? Try 14 months.

Sleeping With Lions

We’ve heard some crazy stories here at National Geographic—everything from a polar bear that shredded an occupied tent to a livid elephant that nearly gored a man. None so terrifying, however, than Big Cats Initiative Grantee Amy Dickman’s lion encounter … but maybe not in the way you might think.

Two Important Lessons From a Couple of WWII Veterans

Every soldier has a good story. However, I was unprepared for the memories these two WWII veterans would have me privy to. I came away from the interview having learned two very important lessons.

Hangout to Cause an UpROAR for Big Cats

A week dedicated to nature’s fiercest felines, we’re celebrating these magnificent creatures by rounding up a team of big cat experts and photographers for our next Google+ Hangout on Tuesday, December 3rd at 12:30 p.m. EST (5:30 p.m. UTC).

NG Explorer Kakenya Ntaiya Honored as One of CNN’s Top 10 Heroes

Kakenya Ntaiya, a trailblazer for women’s education in Kenya and National Geographic Emerging Explorer has been selected as one of CNN’s Top 10 Heroes of 2013.

Hangout and Explore Your Neighborhood With Nat Geo Explorers

What’s it like to swim with manta rays off Mozambique’s remote coast? Or photograph the world’s rarest animals? Our next Google+ Hangout brings together a cadre of Explorers who spend more time in the field than they do in their own homes. This month we’re celebrating The Great Nature Project by asking a manta ray…

DNA Research Reveals Uros People of Peru and Bolivia to Have Distinctive Genetic Ancestries

New genetic research led by the Genographic Project team shows a distinctive ancestry for the Uros populations of Peru and Bolivia that predates the arrival of the Spanish conquistadores and may date back to the earliest settlement of the Altiplano of the central Andes some 3,700 years ago.

Add Your Snapshot to a Global Album of Earth’s Biodiversity

Google+ Hangout: Global Snapshot of the World’s Plants, Animals For 125 years, National Geographic has continued to share its never-ending curiosity about the world and all that is in it. Now we’re handing over the role of photographer and explorer to you. The Great Nature Project invites people of every age and from every continent…