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Six Spot-On Cultural Insights from Greg and Amy Poehler’s “Welcome to Sweden”

Amy Poehler and her brother Greg know that moving is hard. Moving to a country where you don’t speak the language or understand the local customs is even harder . . . and sometimes hilarious.  The Poehler siblings, who are co-Executive Producers for “Welcome to Sweden,” are counting on this fish-out-of-water discomfort to drive their…

“Monster” Sea Scorpion Was a Gentle Giant

New research suggests that fearsome-looking giant sea scorpions were actually likely gentle giants.

Controversy at Cienega Creek: Water for Copper Mining and Streamflow?

The Empire Ranch entrance road transports its travelers from 21st century Sonoran Desert—scattered desert scrub, paved highways, speeding traffic, Border Patrol checkpoints, copper mine arguments—into a world of different dimensions. The sun is still bright in a cerulean sky, but the land has quietly opened up—a wide vista, grass waving in the breeze, a few cattle scattered over the rolling hills, and tall trees bunched along the distant stream.

The Expedition to Reach the “Unconquered Pole” and Save the Arctic Sea

By Lisa Pook I didn’t know I wanted to reach the ‘unconquered’ before January, but then I met Jim McNeill and learned about his Ice Warrior project. There are four ‘North Poles.’ We often hear about explorers trekking to the North Pole, but what they mean is the Geographical North Pole—the point located directly above…

A Chance to Save Our Oceans, and Save Lives

By Michael R. Bloomberg and César Gaviria More than three billion people around the world depend on fish for food or income, and that number is rising even as the supply of fish is falling. The amount of fish caught peaked in the 1990s and has dropped by eight percent since, because there are fewer…

Opinion: Killing of Great Tusker in Kenya Recalls Lesson From the Past

By John Heminway The killing in late May of the great tusker Satao, in Kenya’s Tsavo National Park, was another blunt reminder that no elephant in Africa is safe. A poacher’s poisoned arrow felled him, and his death was presumed to have been long and painful. Satao was thought to be the largest-tusked elephant surviving in Africa. While he…

World Cup Mascot: Explaining the Armadillo

The Brazilian three-banded armadillo, which rolls itself into a soccer-ball-like sphere, is dwindling in its native habitat.

Boston Wins Annual Tap Water Taste Contest

By Daniel Moss The verdict is in: don’t spend another penny on bottled water in Boston. That city, derided in the 1960s song “Dirty Water,” came out on top of the 2014 “Best of the Best” Tap Water Taste Test. The honor was particularly fitting since 11,000 water professionals had descended on Boston for the…

Reciprocal Water Agreements for Watershed Protection

By Keith Alger, Senior Vice President, Latin America, Rare What starts uphill runs downhill, and in countries with mountainous terrain like the high Andes this can mean pollutants from upstream running into drinking water supplies in the valley. Take Colombia—one of the most biodiverse countries in the world; number one in orchid species with over…

Ocean Conservation: Is the Tide Finally Turning?

By Ghislaine Maxwell Fish don’t vote; is that perhaps why the ocean and its problems are a low priority for governments and few politicians see a need to have a public opinion on ocean related issues? The ocean and its myriad of problems generally elicit a collective shrug from the general public. You are more…

Fireflies Are “Cannibals”—And More Surprising Facts About the Summertime Insect

Found throughout the world on summer evenings, these showy beetles are known to eat each other, create “poison,” and scare off predators with blood.

Honoring D-Day: Nat Geo Expeditions Travelers Visit Normandy’s Beaches for the 70th Anniversary

By Sarah Erdman In this anniversary year of D-Day, we are once again reminded of the very definition of courage through black-and-white photographs and grainy footage. As the decades stretch behind us, we remember the day best for the beaches where thousands of people lost their lives, but the riveting chronicle of D-Day begins on other…

Q&A: What Animal Mental Illness Tells Us About Humans

Mental illness doesn’t only affect humans: Animals like dogs and cats suffer from anxiety, dementia, and even phobias, according to a new book.

World Oceans Day 2014: Together, We Have the Power to Protect the Ocean

By Bill Mott World Oceans Day provides a unique opportunity once a year to honor our world’s ocean that connects us all, and this weekend you can join with people in communities around the world to mark the day in a special way. After all, no matter where we live­­—from California to Kansas to the…

Song Saa—Eco Luxury Meets Environmental Sustainability

By Deborah Bassett When Australians Rory and Melita Hunter first traveled to Cambodia’s remote southwest Koh Rong Archipelago in 2005, they embarked upon the journey of a lifetime. Surrounded by the clear turquoise waters of The Gulf of Thailand, the couple happened upon a set of twin islands long known affectionately to locals as Song Saa,…