National Geographic
Menu

Hagfish Slime Could Be Eco-Friendly Fabric

A new study on the defensive goo raises new mysteries and suggests it could be an eco-friendly alternative to nylon.

Cleaning Up Maryland’s Little Falls Branch Creek

By Jo Dickison April 12th was a perfect day for a creek cleanup event. The morning air was crisp and the Little Falls Branch Creek in suburban Maryland was sparkling in the warm spring sun. The stream cleanup is an annual event hosted by the Westmoreland Hills Garden Club, Montgomery County Parks M-NCPPC (Maryland-National Capital Park…

Debunking Captivity: 3 Reasons Not to Keep Dolphins in a Tank

By Maddalena Bearzi   I have spent much time in the company of wild dolphins over the last twenty-something years. I’ve built a career following their everyday movements and observing their behavior both from shore and from research boats. When I began my studies, I knew these creatures primarily as the objects of my research but,…

Building a Resilient Water Portfolio

By Robert B. Sowby People often ask me, “So what’s the answer to the world’s water problems?” and expect an easy, digestible response. But there is no silver bullet. While most water plans have a dominant component, dependence on a single strategy is risky. Climate change, population growth, and other 21st-century challenges can adversely impact…

Biodiversity Gold: Photos from the Golden Gate BioBlitz

View a photo gallery of some of the incredible species discovered at the 2014 National Geographic/National Park Service BioBlitz event.

BioBlitz Highlights From the Social Sphere

By Ryan White, Golden Gate National Parks Conservancy. The big story of BioBlitz can’t be told without all the small stories that make up the event. See some of the best tweets, photos, and more from this year’s event.

Wrapping Up Round Two

By Becca Peixotto, Caver/Scientist. In only eight days of digging, we retrieved more than 320 numbered fossil specimens and an awful lot of sediment. Don’t worry: there’s plenty more.

The Greater London National Park* Opens

“There is this idea that a National Park has to be remote and rural, but cities are incredibly important habitats too.” Daniel Raven-Ellison describes his project to change the way people look at cities.

Defending Madagascar’s Frogs From Invading Fungus

By Jonathan Kolby It all started as an idea one afternoon seven years ago.  Having recently learned about the devastating amphibian chytrid fungus (Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis, or Bd) that was spreading globally and causing irreparable damage to the world’s amphibian biodiversity, I felt there must be something more I could personally do to help save the…

Young Visitor Helps Recover First Top Jaw From the Site

Principal excavator Becca Peixotto reports back on this week’s activity at the Rising Star hominin fossil cave site.

What’s New at This Week’s Excavation

By Becca Peixotto, Caver/Scientist. Discover what’s new about this expedition returning to the hominin fossil chamber at Rising Star.

A Critical Piece of the Hominin Puzzle

The team is back in the cave to recover a tantalizing piece of upper jaw and other fossils in preparation for the groundbreaking workshop to begin in May.

First Person: What I’m Learning on a Simulated Mars Mission

By Jim Urquhart for National Geographic “Mars has been flown by, orbited, smacked into, radar examined, and rocketed onto, as well as bounced upon, rolled over, shoveled, drilled into, baked, and even blasted. Still to come: Mars being stepped on.”—Buzz Aldrin In a remote stretch of Utah desert, five scientific researchers and one journalist, myself, came together this month…

The Urban Water Cycle: Sustaining Our Modern Cities

By Robert B. Sowby Most of us understand the basics of the hydrologic cycle—condensation, precipitation, transportation, and evaporation. These processes operate on global scales and in natural environments. But on local scales and in engineered environments like cities, a different cycle dominates: the urban water cycle. For the first time in history, slightly more than…

Vanishing Innocents: Fish, Dolphins, and Other Sea Creatures in Troubled Waters

By Maddalena Bearzi of the Ocean Conservation Society Sardinia has a unique and unforgettable scent, different from any other place I’ve known. It’s the scent of the Mediterranean undergrowth, of junipers and myrtles. If I close my eyes and concentrate, I can almost smell it even now, thousands of miles away and many years later.…