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Gregg Treinish founded Adventurers and Scientists for Conservation in 2011, mobilizing outdoor enthusiasts in collaborative efforts to protect our natural world. Today, the Bozeman, Montana-based organization works with volunteers to collect and present scientific data, catalyzing global conservation initiatives.

National Geographic named Gregg Adventurer of the Year in 2008, when he and a friend completed a 7,800-mile trek along the spine of the Andes Mountain Range. In 2013, he became a National Geographic Emerging Explorer for his work with ASC. Gregg has a biology degree from Montana State University, a sociology degree from CU-Boulder, and has led expeditions to six continents.

Here, Gregg, his team and volunteers share stories from ASC’s work.

Missing Isotopes: What’s Happening in the World’s Highest Glaciers?

On the roof of the world in Tibet, Natalie Kehrwald and her colleagues have made a surprising discovery about climate and glaciers.

ASC Featured in Teton Gravity Research Film

Adventurers and Scientists for Conservation was featured in “Higher”, a Teton Gravity Research short film.

Rare Black-Footed Ferret Babies

Christin Jones joins in on a late-night black-footed ferret tour to ascertain their numbers. In the fight against extinction, every individual counts.

There’s Something in the Water

Although smaller than five millimeters in size, microplastic particles contaminating our oceans and rivers likely pose a massive environmental and human health risk.

Dog Town

See how wildlife biologists on the Charles M. Russell Wildlife Refuge are bolstering prairie dog populations—and, thereby, an entire ecosystem.

Protecting Our Fortress in the Sky

Standing on the shoulders of giants, Dylan Jones climbs mountains to study the tiny pika—its physical size dwarfed by the scale of its climatological importance. With the implications of climate change becoming more drastic, our mountain fortresses are no longer impenetrable.

Gregg’s Top 10 Okavango Photos

Over the course of the expedition through the Okavango, Gregg has taken huge amounts of photos. Out of such a countless hoard, he has assembled his top 10!

#Okavango14: Out There …

Poling 10,000 years back in time.

#Okavango14: Elephants Will Sense Your Calm

Ever wonder what it’s like to have an elephant watch you set up your tent at night? Stay calm, and the elephant will carry on.

Badger Life From Breakfast to Late Night

There’s always something to see in the grasslands at the American Prairie Reserve. However, every once in a while, Landmark adventure science crews see something out of the ordinary.

New York City to Niagara Falls by Bicycle … With Kids

Most people turn their eyes away from roadkill, but ASC adventurer Charles Scott and his children spent five weeks actively looking for the remains of animals along the road and documenting what they found.

#Okavango14: Monitoring the Delta From the Front Lines

ASC volunteers will manage remote wildlife platforms, monitoring the delta’s fragile ecosystem and collecting data to ensure this area is protected for years to come.

Adventure Science in the Okavango Delta

Four National Geographic Explorers will travel to the Okavango Delta, Botswana in August, collecting data on the health of the newest UNESCO World Heritage Site. They’ll surely encounter crocodiles, hippos and lions.

Defining Paradise

People have different definitions of paradise, but they always know it when they find it. Aaron Teasdale and his family learn about surfing and conservation in Popoyo, Nicaragua.

Team “Uniting Nations” Wins 2,400-Mile Great Pacific Race

Winners of the inaugural Great Pacific Race, team Uniting Nations just arrived in Honolulu, Hawaii, having contributed to marine research as they rowed more than 2,400 miles across the Pacific.