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Elissa Sursara

www.elissasursara.org

Elissa Sursara is a still-studying biologist and conservationist working on behalf of endangered species, threatened habitats and all animals in crisis. She is the ambassador for the World Wildlife Fund's Earth Hour, Sea Shepherd Conservation Society, 1% for the Planet and Australia Zoo's Wildlife Warriors.

Are Sharks Actually The Prey?

Brutally disfigured for their fins and meat, more than 75 million sharks are killed worldwide each year. Through sport, for food and through by-catch, humans have hunted sharks into decimation for more than one hundred staggering years. Where they once ranged valiantly in temperate coastal seas and oceans, they now exist in poor minorities, extinct…

10 Animals That Are (Mostly) Monogamous

With divorce rates in the United States skyrocketing to almost 50% of marriages, it’s easy to lose faith in the sanctity of long-term love. But before you give up hope on all that matrimony, here’s a few non-human animals setting an incredible example of what it means to be dedicated to your chosen mate –…

Stanford: There’s No Money in Dead Bears

April 1st saw the opening of another trophy hunt season in British Columbia, a sport in which armed hunters stalk bears, moose and other selective wild game animals, killing them and retaining their paws and heads as memorial. Long considered morally unsound by scientists and conservationists, researchers are again questioning controversial industry claims that trophy…

Palm Oil: The Other Kind of Oil Spill

Palm oil monoculture is palming off orangutans in record numbers. Today, less than 70,000 orangutans exist in small wild pockets in the rainforests of Borneo and Sumatra. Populations are patchy and both species of orangutan are considered endangered, with conversion of land for palm oil plantation believed to be the species’ biggest threat. Today, the…