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Brian Clark Howard covers the environment for National Geographic. He previously served as an editor for TheDailyGreen.com and E/The Environmental Magazine, and has written for Popular Science, TheAtlantic.com, FastCompany.com, PopularMechanics.com, Yahoo!, MSN, and elsewhere. He is the co-author of six books, including Geothermal HVACGreen LightingBuild Your Own Small Wind Power System, and Rock Your Ugly Christmas Sweater.

Funny Video Takes on Plastic Pollution

As scientists debate how the world’s ocean might be picked free of plastic trash (hint: no one knows), a European nonprofit is taking on the problem with humor. The group Seas at Risk has just released the video above to remind people that what we do on land can have an impact on the ocean. Seas…

“DamNation” Film Wins Enviro Prize and Shines Light on Dam Removal

“Dams represented a pivotal part of U.S. development, but like many things we took it too far,” Ben Knight says in the new documentary film DamNation. Knight narrated, edited, and co-directed the film, which takes a provocative look at the recent movement to remove old and outdated dams, to restore natural river systems. Produced by…

“First Ever” Photos of Rare Albino Marlin

On March 11, an angler hooked a rare fish: a 300-pound albino blue marlin. The animal was released alive, and photos of the encounter may be the first recorded images of an albino blue marlin, according to the Billfish Report. It was about 1 pm, during a charter fishing trip on the 42-foot boat Spanish…

“Reptile-Like” Bird and Sea Turtles Released on Indonesian Beach

A remote, protected beach on the Indonesian island of Sulawesi is a critical nesting area for “strange” birds called maleos and olive ridley sea turtles, reports the Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS) in New York. On February 23 on Sulawesi’s Binerean Cape, conservationists with WCS and local partner PALS (Pelestari Alam Liar dan Satwa, or Wildlife and…

New Video Shines Light on Walking Shark Discovery

In the first of a new video series by The Pew Charitable Trusts, a scientist explains how he found a new species of walking shark off Indonesia. According to Pew: Scientist Mark Erdmann was participating in a nighttime scuba dive off the coast of Halmahera, Indonesia when he stumbled on a new species of walking…

Robert Redford and Will Ferrell “Fight” Over the Colorado River

Stars Robert Redford and Will Ferrell have a bone to pick with each other when it comes to water. Well, not really, but they do make some good points in this funny video calling for restoration of the embattled, and thirsty, Colorado River Basin. The celebrities are working to support Raise the River, a campaign building…

Salmon Trucked to Ocean? Freshwater Species of the Week

The annual fall run of young salmon from their inland birthplaces in rivers to the sea is one of Nature’s dramatic migrations. But this year, a number of chinook salmon may make that journey by truck. This week, state and federal wildlife officials in northern California announced that they will ferry hatchery-raised salmon to the…

Pharrell Williams Launches Denim Line Made From Recycled Ocean Debris

Singer, songwriter, and producer Pharrell Williams has a hit new album out and collaborated on last summer’s two hottest songs (“Get Lucky” and “Blurred Lines.”) And now he can add sustainable fashion to his list of accomplishments. Williams answered questions from Ocean Views (below) on his latest project with clothing maker G-Star RAW. In addition…

Volunteers Needed to Study American Eels

This week, a trio of organizations have asked the public to help gather data on one of New York City’s more slippery residents: the American eel (Anguilla rostrata). (We previously profiled the American eel as a Freshwater Species of the Week in August 2012.) Wildlife Conservation Society’s New York Aquarium, the New York State Department…

Tackling Overfishing on Many Fronts

As the World Ocean Summit winds down in Half Moon Bay, California, this evening, much discussion among the hundreds of gathered delegates has turned to overfishing.  There were perhaps as many thoughts on the subject as members in attendance from the fishing industry, academia, conservation organizations, and the media. But, several solutions emerged that received…

Can World Leaders Tame the Wild West of the High Seas?

Earlier this month, Indonesia announced the world’s largest sanctuary for manta rays. At the World Ocean Summit Tuesday, Peter Seligmann, the CEO of Conservation International, said the sanctuary “was not done out of good will, it was done out of enlightened self interest.” Seligmann said Indonesia had made careful calculations about how much manta rays…

John Kerry and Prince Charles Urge Immediate Action on Ocean Protection

The editor-in-chief of The Economist, John Micklethwait, asked a packed room at the World Ocean Summit if they thought the ocean was in worse shape now than when the conference was first held in 2012. Almost everyone held up a pre-printed red card that read “yes,” leading Micklethwait to say that the room had responded…

World Ocean Summit Puts Marine Issues “On Global Agenda”

Hundreds of representatives from national governments, environmental organizations, academic institutions, and corporations have gathered in Half Moon Bay, California, for the World Ocean Summit February 24-26. As the sun rises over the hills to shed first light on the Pacific Ocean, delegates are meeting to discuss solutions to international ocean governance and sustainable use of…

Filmmaker Greg MacGillivray Shares His “Journey to the South Pacific”

  Journey to the South Pacific, a new 3D IMAX film now in theaters, takes moviegoers on an adventure through the island paradise of remote West Papua, a province of Indonesia in the Coral Triangle. Narrated by Cate Blanchett, the film tells the story of Jawi Mayor, a young island boy who discovers the incredible diversity…

First Fish That’s No Longer Endangered: Freshwater Species of the Week

This week, for the first time, a fish has been declared recovered under the U.S. Endangered Species Act. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service proposed this week that the Oregon chub (Oregonichthys crameri) “has recovered and no longer meets the definition of an endangered species or a threatened species under the Endangered Species Act of 1973.” The silvery…