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Top 25 Wild Bird Photographs of the Week #67

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Building a global community around the freedom and beauty of bird in the wild as ambassadors for the natural ecosystems that they depend upon is our mission. They are the music, decoration and character of every terrestrial habitat on the planet and have been around since the dinosaurs. They are the witnesses and ambassadors of the awesome power of nature. The Earth has seen cataclysms like us before and has always come back after the threat has subsided. The wide availability of good, cheap optics has opened their world to us for the last few decades. Amazing, affordable DSLR cameras with long lenses are delivery brilliant digital bird imagery to online communities. This is one of our best collections of wild bird photographs ever!

We are in a day-and-age during which more bird species are threatened with extinction than ever before. The Wild Bird Revolution aims to publish the “Top 25 Wild Bird Photographs of the Week” to 1 million people every week by the end of the year. That is a revolution that will change the world! Join thousands of other weekend naturalists, photographers, birders, experts, hikers, nature-lovers, guides, scientists, conservationists and artists that share the thousands of wild bird photographs submitted to the Wild Bird Trust website and Facebook page. Thousands of wild bird enthusiasts are going out everyday to photograph our planet’s beautiful birdlife. Pick up your camera, fill your bird feeder, open your heart, and join the Wild Bird Revolution!!

Please help us continue our work by donating to the Wild Bird Trust: http://www.wildbirdtrust.com/donations/ Go to the new Wild Bird Trust website to learn more about our research and conservation projects in Africa. Your wild bird photographs can now be submitted at:

www.wildbirdtrust.com/top25

Include #greatnature #wildbird when posting new photos!

"Must see...!" Nilgiri flycatchers are a sought-after sighting in the higher altitude shola forests in the W Ghats and the Nilgiris (India). (Vidjit Vijaysanker)

Nilgiri Flycatchers are a sought-after sighting in the higher altitude shola forests in the W Ghats and the Nilgiris (India). (Vidjit Vijaysanker)
"Sword fighter" Sword-billed hummingbirds are the sole member of the genus Ensifera and are found in the higher elevations of Bolivia, Colombia, Ecuador, Peru and Venezuela. (Frank Thierfelder)
Sword-billed hummingbirds are the sole member of the genus Ensifera and are found in the higher elevations of Bolivia, Colombia, Ecuador, Peru and Venezuela. (Frank Thierfelder)
Fire-tailed myzornis prefer subtropical or tropical moist montane forests in Bhutan, China, India, Myanmar, and Nepal. (Soumyajit Nandy‎)
“Warm heart” Fire-tailed myzornis prefer subtropical or tropical moist montane forests in Bhutan, China, India, Myanmar, and Nepal. (Soumyajit Nandy‎)
"Local cranes" Sarus cranes are non-migratory in the wetlands and uncultivated lands of the Indian Subcontinent, SE Asia and Australia. (Shreya Singha Ray)
Sarus cranes are non-migratory in the wetlands and uncultivated lands of the Indian Subcontinent, SE Asia and Australia. (Shreya Singha Ray)
Mountain bluebirds prefer the open, mountainous country across W North America as far N as Alaska, and is the "state bird" of Idaho and Nevada.  (John Carlson)
“Special blue” Mountain bluebirds prefer the open, mountainous country across W North America as far N as Alaska, and is the “state bird” of Idaho and Nevada. (John Carlson)
Sharp-tailed grouses are found throughout the remaining American prairies in the USA and Canada. (John Carlson)
“Landing gear” Sharp-tailed grouses are found throughout the remaining American prairies in the USA and Canada. (John Carlson)
Malachite kingfishers are small kingfishers that sit low to the water and feed on small fish, frogs and tadpoles throughout in Africa S of the Sahara. (Trevor Kleyn)
“Blue flash” Malachite kingfishers are small kingfishers that sit low to the water and feed on small fish, frogs and tadpoles throughout in Africa S of the Sahara. (Trevor Kleyn)
Flame bowerbirds are little-known and considered endemic to rainforests of New Guinea. (Markus Lilje / www.rockjumperbirding.com)
“Forest flames” Flame bowerbirds are little-known and considered endemic to rainforests of New Guinea. (Markus Lilje / www.rockjumperbirding.com)
Ostriches are distributed throughout Africa up to the Sahel and have gone extinct in Arabia. (Chad Wright)
“Run baby run!” Ostriches are distributed throughout Africa up to the Sahel and have gone extinct in Arabia. (Chad Wright)
Burrowing owls are considered Endangered in Canada, threatened in Mexico, and a "species of special concern" in Florida and most of the W USA. (Salah Baazizi)
“Underground owl” Burrowing owls are considered Endangered in Canada, threatened in Mexico, and a “species of special concern” in Florida and most of the W USA. (Salah Baazizi)
Serendib scops owls were formally described as a new species in 2004 after being observed for the first-time on 23 January 2001 in Sinharaja (Sri Lanka). (Sabu Kinattukara)
“Newest owl” Serendib scops owls were formally described as a new species in 2004 after being observed for the first-time on 23 January 2001 in Sinharaja (Sri Lanka). (Sabu Kinattukara)
Greater sage-grouse or "sage grouse" prefer the sagebrush habitat of W United States and S Alberta and Saskatchewan (Canada). (John Carlson}
“Spike fan” Greater sage-grouse or “sage grouse” prefer the sagebrush habitat of W United States and S Alberta and Saskatchewan (Canada). (John Carlson}
Violet sabrewings prefer the the understory and edges of mountain forests near permanent streams of S Mexico and Central America all the way S to Costa Rica and W Panama. (Jenny Alvarado)
“Purple hovering” Violet sabrewings prefer the the understory and edges of mountain forests near permanent streams of S Mexico and Central America all the way S to Costa Rica and W Panama. (Jenny Alvarado)
Yellow-wattled lapwings are  endemic to the Indian Subcontinent, preferring the dry, sandy plains of the peninsula. (Hemant Kumar)
“Wattled runner” Yellow-wattled lapwings are endemic to the Indian Subcontinent, preferring the dry, sandy plains of the peninsula. (Hemant Kumar)
Asian openbills prefer inland wetlands and are widespread and abundant in India, Sri Lanka, Burma and Thailand. (Hemant Kumar)
“Snail cracker” Asian openbills prefer inland wetlands and are widespread and abundant in India, Sri Lanka, Burma and Thailand. (Hemant Kumar)
Elegant tern are named for their delicate beauty and breed on the Pacific coasts of the S USA and Mexico, wintering S to Peru, Ecuador and Chile. (Salah Baazizi)
“Ascending angel” Elegant tern are named for their delicate beauty and breed on the Pacific coasts of the S USA and Mexico, wintering S to Peru, Ecuador and Chile. (Salah Baazizi)
Dark-breasted rosefinches prefer the boreal forests and subtropical or tropical high-altitude shrubland in Bhutan, China, India, Laos, Myanmar, Nepal, Pakistan, Thailand, and Vietnam. (Dibyendu Ash)
“Dark rose” Dark-breasted rosefinches prefer the boreal forests and subtropical or tropical high-altitude shrubland in Bhutan, China, India, Laos, Myanmar, Nepal, Pakistan, Thailand, and Vietnam. (Dibyendu Ash)
Coppersmith barbets prefer gardens, sparse woodland, and forest patches with sufficient dead wood for excavation throughout S Asia. (Deepansh Mishra)
“Metalworker” Coppersmith barbets prefer gardens, sparse woodland, and forest patches with sufficient dead wood for excavation throughout S Asia. (Deepansh Mishra)
American yellow warbler are common throughout the United States and N South America, but are declining throughout their dustributional range due to habitat loss and pesticides. (Agniva Das )
“Yellow flash” American yellow warbler are common throughout the United States and N South America, but are declining throughout their dustributional range due to habitat loss and pesticides. (Agniva Das )
Common hawk-cuckoo are the same size and have a strong resemblence to the Shikra, both found on the Indian Subcontinent. Known as the "brain-fever bird" because of its repetitive call during summer. (Akshay Jadhav)
“Look-a-like” Common hawk-cuckoo are the same size and have a strong resemblence to the Shikra, both found on the Indian Subcontinent. Known as the “brain-fever bird” because of its repetitive call during summer. (Akshay Jadhav)
Ultramarine flycatchers are a small arboreal Old World flycatcher that breeds in the foothills of the Himalayas and winter in S India. (Akshay Jadhav)
“Smart percher” Ultramarine flycatchers are a small arboreal Old World flycatcher that breeds in the foothills of the Himalayas and winter in S India. (Akshay Jadhav)
Asian pied starlings prefer the open plains and low foothills of the Indian subcontinent and SE Asia, moving around in small groups that forage together. (Arindam Saha)
“Shy myna?” Asian pied starlings prefer the open plains and low foothills of the Indian subcontinent and SE Asia, moving around in small groups that forage together. (Arindam Saha)
Cape parrots are endemic to South Africa's yellowwood forest along mountain ranges with south-facing slopes in S and E South Africa. There are less than 1,000 remaining in the wild. (Rodnick Clifton Biljon)
“National parrot” Cape parrots are endemic to South Africa’s yellowwood forest along mountain ranges with south-facing slopes in S and E South Africa. There are less than 1,000 remaining in the wild. (Rodnick Clifton Biljon)
A black crow riding the wing of an Endangered Cape vulture, which is considered endemic to S Africa. (Burkhard Schlosser)
“Wing rider” A black crow riding the wing of an Endangered Cape vulture, which is considered endemic to S Africa. (Burkhard Schlosser)
Chinspot batis can be found in wooded habitat throughout S, central and E Africa in found in Angola, Botswana, Burundi, Republic of the Congo, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Gabon, Kenya, Lesotho, Malawi, Mozambique, Namibia, Rwanda, South Africa, Sudan, Swaziland, Tanzania, Uganda, Zambia, and Zimbabwe. (Chad Wright)
“Little beauty” Chinspot batis can be found in wooded habitat throughout S, central and E Africa in found in Angola, Botswana, Burundi, Republic of the Congo, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Gabon, Kenya, Lesotho, Malawi, Mozambique, Namibia, Rwanda, South Africa, Sudan, Swaziland, Tanzania, Uganda, Zambia, and Zimbabwe. (Chad Wright)

The Wild Bird Trust would like to thank Swarovski Optik for helping to make the “Top 25 Wild Bird Photographs of the Week” a possibility! Go to the new Wild BirdTrust website for a chance to WIN a pair of amazing Swarovski binoculars by donating $10!

See last week “Top 25 Wild Bird Photographs of the Week #65″:

Comments

  1. Mickey Herd
    South Africa
    June 11, 7:56 am

    Beautiful !! Thank you for sharing

  2. Barbara Fux
    Slovenia
    June 6, 7:11 am

    Thanks for sharing, such a pleasure to the eye and mind…

  3. Arindam Saha
    India,West Bengal,Kolkata
    June 2, 6:21 am

    If you sent an e-mail to every one then it will be great.

  4. Arindam Saha
    India,West Bengal,Kolkata
    June 2, 6:20 am

    Thanks a lot for selecting my picture.

  5. Fermin Marcina
    sorsogon, philippines
    June 1, 7:17 pm

    I love birds of different kinds and i like seeing them glide in the air as they fly… without these birds, the beauty of the earth is not complete..

  6. Yashi
    Abha,Saudi Arabia
    June 1, 4:20 am

    Thanks for sharing these wonderful pictures of birds from all over the world,they enrich our lives by their presence.

  7. Vidya kulkarni
    Mumbai
    June 1, 2:01 am

    Your posts are amazing, is it possible to submit my images to your site?
    Is it possible to add EXIF details to every image you have selected in best 25??

  8. Avinash Mahajan
    Pune
    May 31, 11:24 pm

    I appreciate wholeheartedly !