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Top 25 Wild Bird Photographs of the Week #65

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We cannot overstate the dedication of wild bird photographers around the world. Birds are extremely risk-averse and getting close is a time-earned skill born of years learning about their behaviour. Knowledge of your camera is essential with no room for error before this bird takes off. The wild bird photographs in this week’s collection are among the best we have ever published. Frogmouths feature again. Like the African Shoebill, there is just something about this prehistoric species that connect us with a remote past before modern man. They were around almost 60 million years and demonstrate just how amazing birds really are. Primitive birds were airborne over the last great dinosaurs and are witnesses to global cataclysms like ice ages, meteor strikes, global warming, and the industrial revolution. 

Please ask your friends and colleagues to join the Wild Bird Trust’s Facebook page: www.facebook.com/wildbirdtrust! The “Wild Bird Revolution” is a social movement that celebrates the amazing beauty and wonder of birds in the wild. Amazing lenses and high resolution cameras in our phones and tablets. New, cheaper, widely available DSLR cameras and “point-and-shoots” that get stunning results. Just 50 years ago digital photography had not yet been imagined and very few people even had binoculars. Birds were flashes of color in the forest and fast-moving silhouettes high in the sky. This campaign brings the color and vibrance of wild birds into your life to share with your friends and family!

We are in a day-and-age during which more bird species are threatened with extinction than ever before. The Wild Bird Revolution aims to publish the “Top 25 Wild Bird Photographs of the Week” to 1 million people every week by the end of the year. That is a revolution that will change the world! Join thousands of other weekend naturalists, photographers, birders, experts, hikers, nature-lovers, guides, scientists, conservationists and artists that share the thousands of wild bird photographs submitted to the Wild Bird Trust website and Facebook page. Thousands of wild bird enthusiasts are going out everyday to photograph our planet’s beautiful birdlife. Pick up your camera, fill your bird feeder, open your heart, and join the Wild Bird Revolution!!

Please help us continue our work by donating to the Wild Bird Trust: http://www.wildbirdtrust.com/donations/ Go to the new Wild Bird Trust website to learn more about our research and conservation projects in Africa. Your wild bird photographs can now be submitted at:

www.wildbirdtrust.com/top25

Include #greatnature #wildbird when posting new photos!

Tawny frogmouths have been around for about 56 million years and are found throughout the Australian mainland, Tasmania and southern New Guinea. Photographed here in Byron Bay (New South Wales, Australia). (Deborah Pearse)
Tawny frogmouths have been around for about 56 million years and are found throughout the Australian mainland, Tasmania and southern New Guinea. Photographed here in Byron Bay (New South Wales, Australia). (Deborah Pearse)
"Down you go..." Brown-headed gulls breed in the high plateaus of central Asia from Tajikistan to Inner Mongolia, wintering on the coasts and large inland lakes of tropical S Asia. (Akshay Jadhav)
“Down you go…” Brown-headed gulls breed in the high plateaus of central Asia from Tajikistan to Inner Mongolia, wintering on the coasts and large inland lakes of tropical S Asia. (Akshay Jadhav)
"Purple gem" Purple sunbirds prefer sparse woodlands, suburban gardens, and even urban areas from W Asia through to the Indian Subcontinent and into SE Asia. (Mahesh Lakshminarayana)
“Purple gem” Purple sunbirds prefer sparse woodlands, suburban gardens, and even urban areas from W Asia through to the Indian Subcontinent and into SE Asia. (Mahesh Lakshminarayana)
"Forest special" Striped kingfisher are distributed throughout sub-Saharan Africa with the exception of the dense tropical forests of the Congo Basin, the extreme NE, and most of Namibia and NE South Africa. (Andrew Keys)
“Forest special” Striped kingfisher are distributed throughout sub-Saharan Africa with the exception of the dense tropical forests of the Congo Basin, the extreme NE, and most of Namibia and NE South Africa. (Andrew Keys)
"Botswana's yellow foot" Little egrets breed in the wetlands of warmer temperate to tropical parts of Europe, Africa, Asia and Australia. N populations (e.g. Europe) migrate S to Africa and S Asia for winter. (Ashish Inamdar)
“Botswana’s yellow foot” Little egrets breed in the wetlands of warmer temperate to tropical parts of Europe, Africa, Asia and Australia. N populations (e.g. Europe) migrate S to Africa and S Asia for winter. (Ashish Inamdar)
"Green hawking" Green bee-eaters are widely distributed across sub-Saharan Africa from Senegal and the Gambia to Ethiopia, the Nile valley, W Arabia and Asia through India to Vietnam. (Deepansh Mishra)
“Green hawking” Green bee-eaters are widely distributed across sub-Saharan Africa from Senegal and the Gambia to Ethiopia, the Nile valley, W Arabia and Asia through India to Vietnam. (Deepansh Mishra)
"Sunset flyer" Green bee-eaters prefer opemn, scruby landscapes and are most common in the Himalayas. (Ankur Patel)
“Sunset flyer” Green bee-eaters prefer opemn, scruby landscapes and are most common in the Himalayas. (Ankur Patel)
"Best of the forest" Green-backed kingfishers are endemic to Indonesia and are threatened by habitat loss in subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests. ( Jonathan Rossouw)
“Best of the forest” Green-backed kingfishers are endemic to Indonesia and are threatened by habitat loss in subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests. ( Jonathan Rossouw)
"Flying banana" Southern yellow-billed hornbills are a relatively common sighting in the savanna bushveld of S Africa in South Africa, Namibia, Angola, Botswana, Zambia and Zimbabwe. (Paul Parsonage)
“Flying banana” Southern yellow-billed hornbills are a relatively common sighting in the savanna bushveld of S Africa in South Africa, Namibia, Angola, Botswana, Zambia and Zimbabwe. (Paul Parsonage)
"Unique American" Rufous-tailed jacamars breed in the tropical New World in S Mexico, Central America and South America all the way down to S Brazil and Ecuador. (Owen Deutsch)
“Unique American” Rufous-tailed jacamars breed in the tropical New World in S Mexico, Central America and South America all the way down to S Brazil and Ecuador. (Owen Deutsch)
"Leaf litter specialist" Orange-headed thrushes are relatively common in well-wooded areas of the Indian Subcontinent and SE Asia. Photographed here in Bangalore (India). (Shishir Saksena)
“Leaf litter specialist” Orange-headed thrushes are relatively common in well-wooded areas of the Indian Subcontinent and SE Asia. Photographed here in Bangalore (India). (Shishir Saksena)
"Little inspector" Mountain wren-babblers prefer the subtropical or tropical moist lowland and montane forests of Indonesia and Malaysia. Photographed here in W Java (Indonesia). (Arun Samak)
“Little inspector” Mountain wren-babblers prefer the subtropical or tropical moist lowland and montane forests of Indonesia and Malaysia. Photographed here in W Java (Indonesia). (Arun Samak)
"Daytime camouflage" Mottled wood owls are found in gardens and deciduous forests near dry thorn forests or farmlands in India. Photographed here in Pune (Maharashtra, India). (Kedar Potnis)
“Daytime camouflage” Mottled wood owls are found in gardens and deciduous forests near dry thorn forests or farmlands in India. Photographed here in Pune (Maharashtra, India). (Kedar Potnis)
"Wringling prize" Lilac-breasted rollers are a cavity-nesting insectivore that prefers open woodlands and are widely distributed in sub-Saharan Africa and the S Arabian Peninsula. (Saravanan Sundaram)
“Wringling prize” Lilac-breasted rollers are a cavity-nesting insectivore that prefers open woodlands and are widely distributed in sub-Saharan Africa and the S Arabian Peninsula. (Saravanan Sundaram)
"Flash of color" Knysna turacos are resident breeders in evergreen hardwood forests of S and E South Africa, as well as Swaziland. Photographed here in Plettenberg Bay (South Africa). (Claire Hamilton)
“Flash of color” Knysna turacos are resident breeders in evergreen hardwood forests of S and E South Africa, as well as Swaziland. Photographed here in Plettenberg Bay (South Africa). (Claire Hamilton)
"Horned night watchmen" Indian eagle owls are found in open wooded areas near rocky outcrops on the Indian Subcontinent S of the Himalayas at lower altitudes. (Pritam Pashte)
“Horned night watchmen” Indian eagle owls are found in open wooded areas near rocky outcrops on the Indian Subcontinent S of the Himalayas at lower altitudes. (Pritam Pashte)
"Obsessed fisherman" Ospreys are one of the most widely distributed raptors in the world and have been demonstrated to breed successfully at the age of 28. (Raghu Narayan)
“Obsessed fisherman” Ospreys are one of the most widely distributed raptors in the world and have been demonstrated to breed successfully at the age of 28. (Raghu Narayan)
"Fuzzed up" Yellow-browed bulbuls are found mainly below the forest canopy of hill forests and plantations in the W Ghats and Sri Lanka. (Rahul Deshpande)
“Fuzzed up” Yellow-browed bulbuls are found mainly below the forest canopy of hill forests and plantations in the W Ghats and Sri Lanka. (Rahul Deshpande)
"Little brown job" Brown-breasted flycatchers breeds in NE India, central and S China and N Burma and Thailand, and migrates to S India and Sri Lanka. (Rahul Deshpande)
“Little brown job” Brown-breasted flycatchers breeds in NE India, central and S China and N Burma and Thailand, and migrates to S India and Sri Lanka. (Rahul Deshpande)
"Red cheeks" Red-whiskered bulbuls are distributed across tropical Asia, but have established feral populations in Australia, Los Angeles, Hawaii and Florida in the United States, and Mauritius. (Pratik Humnabadkar)
“Red cheeks” Red-whiskered bulbuls are distributed across tropical Asia, but have established feral populations in Australia, Los Angeles, Hawaii and Florida in the United States, and Mauritius. (Pratik Humnabadkar)
Spotted owlets are a well-known little owl that prefers open habitats like farmlands and cities often using human habitation across tropical Asia from India all the way to SE Asia. (Santhosh Kumar)
“At home in the hole” Spotted owlets are a well-known little owl that prefers open habitats like farmlands and cities often using human habitation across tropical Asia from India all the way to SE Asia. (Santhosh Kumar)
Scarlet minivets are found in forests and well-wooded habitats in tropical S Asia from the Indian subcontinent E to S China, Indonesia, and the Philippines. Photographed here in Siliguri (India). (Debapratim Saha)
“Flashy feathers” Scarlet minivets are found in forests and well-wooded habitats in tropical S Asia from the Indian subcontinent E to S China, Indonesia, and the Philippines. Photographed here in Siliguri (India). (Debapratim Saha)
Blue-tailed bee-eaters sit on open perches to hawk for insects like bees, wasps, hornets and butterflies. (Solomon Sampath Kumar)
“Delicate butterfly landing” Blue-tailed bee-eaters sit on open perches to hawk for insects like bees, wasps, hornets and butterflies. (Solomon Sampath Kumar)
Blue-tailed bee-eater are a distinctive near-passerine resident across much of SE Asia with several populations migrating to the Indian Subcontinent to breed. (Solomon Sampath Kumar)
“Heated discussion” Blue-tailed bee-eater are a distinctive near-passerine resident across much of SE Asia with several populations migrating to the Indian Subcontinent to breed. (Solomon Sampath Kumar)
Tickell's blue flycatchers have a wide distributional range stretching from India all he way to Indonesia. Photographed here in Bangalore (India). (Shishir Saksena)
“Sough-after color bomb” Tickell’s blue flycatchers have a wide distributional range stretching from India all he way to Indonesia. Photographed here in Bangalore (India). (Shishir Saksena)

 

The Wild Bird Trust would like to thank Swarovski Optik for helping to make the “Top 25 Wild Bird Photographs of the Week” a possibility! Go to the new Wild BirdTrust websitefor a chance to WIN a pair of amazing Swarovski binoculars by donating $10!

 

See last week “Top 25 Wild Bird Photographs of the Week #64″:

Comments

  1. Sanil Gajadhar
    Mauritius
    April 20, 4:27 pm

    Nice Selection!!!

  2. Rocky chaudhry
    usa
    April 20, 7:23 am

    very special and beautiful birds .Many Thanks for posting .

  3. samir
    Bhavnagar
    April 19, 3:09 am

    Beautiful…..

  4. rahul
    Dehradun
    April 18, 11:38 pm

    Congrats to all Indians

  5. Ajgar Ali Ahmed
    Guwahati
    April 18, 3:38 pm

    What a beautiful birds are !!!

  6. Pradeep Kumar
    coimbatore
    April 18, 9:41 am

    Spotted owlet (Santhosh Kumar) . very nice click. it’s all for your hard work and dedication. it’s one of your milestone achieved it.. now top 25,we trust you achieved many. . heartly wishes <3

  7. Rangith
    Coimbatore
    April 18, 7:35 am

    “At home in the hole” – Santhosh ….. done well …. stepping ahead in the world of photography… congrats

  8. Pradnya S. Virdi
    Nagpur (India)
    April 18, 5:16 am

    Fascinating photographs of birds! Very informative too.

  9. Srikanth Karthikeyan
    Tamil Nadu, India
    April 18, 5:07 am

    Spotted owlet (Santhosh Kumar) is natural and best click of all!!! Awesome work…Congrats and go on!!!

  10. Manoj Mohan
    Coimbatore
    April 18, 5:03 am

    Spotted owlet – Picture taken by Santosh Kumar is awesome.Coimbatore is proud of you..Keep rocking..

  11. S.N.Rama Raju
    Rajapalayam
    April 17, 9:43 am

    Lovely photos of birds !

  12. António Dias
    Maia - Portugal
    April 17, 8:24 am

    Magnificent photos!!!!

  13. Vidya kulkarni
    Mumbai
    April 17, 4:40 am

    All the bird images are very good!!