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Top 25 Wild Bird Photographs of the Week #64

Kingfishers, fish-eagles, orioles, flycatchers, lovebirds, wagtails, bush-shrikes, broadbills, bee-eaters, and laughing-thrushes… A fantastic collection of wild bird photographs that sets the standard for 2014! All these photographers need to be commended for their commitment and skill. We need to do everything we can to make sure that our children get to see, hear and photograph these amazing birds in the wild. Everywhere we go birds are the color and song that we remember. It seems the more we disturb or destroy natural habitat, the less colorful and diverse the bird species become… We cannot manage for diversity or accommodate beautiful birds in our biggest cities. This needs to change. We need to bring nature back into our cities.

The “Wild Bird Revolution” is a social movement that celebrates the amazing beauty and wonder of birds in the wild. Amazing lenses and high resolution cameras in our phones and tablets. New, cheaper, widely available DSLR cameras and “point-and-shoots” that get stunning results. Just 50 years ago digital photography had not yet been imagined and very few people even had binoculars. Birds were flashes of color in the forest and fast-moving silhouettes high in the sky. This campaign brings the color and vibrance of wild birds into your life to share with your friends and family!

We are in a day-and-age during which more bird species are threatened with extinction than ever before. The Wild Bird Revolution aims to publish the “Top 25 Wild Bird Photographs of the Week” to 1 million people every week by the end of the year. That is a revolution that will change the world! Join thousands of other weekend naturalists, photographers, birders, experts, hikers, nature-lovers, guides, scientists, conservationists and artists that share the thousands of wild bird photographs submitted to the Wild Bird Trust website and Facebook page. Thousands of wild bird enthusiasts are going out everyday to photograph our planet’s beautiful birdlife. Pick up your camera, fill your bird feeder, open your heart, and join the Wild Bird Revolution!!

Please help us continue our work by donating to the Wild Bird Trust: http://www.wildbirdtrust.com/donations/ Go to the new Wild Bird Trust website to learn more about our research and conservation projects in Africa. Your wild bird photographs can now be submitted at:

www.wildbirdtrust.com/top25

Include #greatnature #wildbird when posting new photos!

Woodland kingfishers are a widespread cavity-nesting tree kingfishers in tropical Africa S of the Sahara and from the N part of South Africa N throughout subtropics. (Chris Krog)
“Perfect display!” Woodland kingfishers are a widespread cavity-nesting tree kingfishers in tropical Africa S of the Sahara and from the N part of South Africa N throughout subtropics. (Chris Krog)
African fish eagles are a common feature around healthy water bodies and rvers across SubSaharan Africa, punctuating African cunsets with their enigmatic call. (Stacey Farrell)
“Taking off to the heavens” African fish eagles are a common feature around healthy water bodies and rvers across SubSaharan Africa, punctuating African cunsets with their enigmatic call. (Stacey Farrell)
Coppersmith barbets are a well-known cavity-nester distributed across the Indian Subcontinent and parts of SE Asia. (Akshay Jadhav)
“More than a mouth full” Coppersmith barbets are a well-known cavity-nester distributed across the Indian Subcontinent and parts of SE Asia. (Akshay Jadhav)
Indian golden orioles are a vibrant forest specialist found across most of the Indian Subcontinent, as well as in Pakistan, Uzbekistan, Turkmenistan, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, Afghanistan and Nepal. (Akshay Jadhav)
“Forest gold!” Indian golden orioles are a vibrant forest specialist found across most of the Indian Subcontinent, as well as in Pakistan, Uzbekistan, Turkmenistan, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, Afghanistan and Nepal. (Akshay Jadhav)
Asian paradise flycatchers are a well-known resident of thick forests and well-wooded habitats (e.g. riverbanks) from Turkestan to Manchuria, as well as much of India and Sri Lanka with populations on the Malay Archipelago. (Ashish Inamdar)
“Punk nest-builder” Asian paradise flycatchers are a well-known resident of thick forests and well-wooded habitats (e.g. riverbanks) from Turkestan to Manchuria, as well as much of India and Sri Lanka with populations on the Malay Archipelago. (Ashish Inamdar)
Painted storks are closely related to the yellow-billed storks of Africa and are found in the wetlands of tropical Asia S of the Himalayas on the Indian Subcontinent and across SE Asia. (Ashish Inamdar)
“Together is more effective!” Painted storks are closely related to the yellow-billed storks of Africa and are found in the wetlands of tropical Asia S of the Himalayas on the Indian Subcontinent and across SE Asia. (Ashish Inamdar)
Fischers lovebirds have a restricted distributional range between 1,100-2,200m in E-central Africa, S and SE of Lake Victoria in N Tanzania centred around the Serengeti National Park. (Markus Lilje / www.rockjumperbirding.com)
“Watch my back while I am drinking!” Fischers lovebirds have a restricted distributional range between 1,100-2,200m in E-central Africa, S and SE of Lake Victoria in N Tanzania centred around the Serengeti National Park. (Markus Lilje / www.rockjumperbirding.com)
Grey wagtails are widely distributed across the Palearctic region from Iran, Turkey and the Caucasus) all the way to the main populations in W Europe in the British Isles, Scandinavia and Mediterranean. (Jignesh Minaxi)
“Water mirror” Grey wagtails are widely distributed across the Palearctic region from Iran, Turkey and the Caucasus) all the way to the main populations in W Europe in the British Isles, Scandinavia and Mediterranean. (Jignesh Minaxi)
Spot-billed ducks feed mainly at night in freshwater lakes and marshes in fairly open country in the southern part of its range from Pakistan and India to S Japan. (Jignesh Minaxi)
“Perfect duck” Spot-billed ducks feed mainly at night in freshwater lakes and marshes in fairly open country in the southern part of its range from Pakistan and India to S Japan. (Jignesh Minaxi)
Red-breasted flycatchers breed in E Europe and central Asia, migrating in winter to S Asia. (Jignesh Minaxi)
“Inquisitive little catcher” Red-breasted flycatchers breed in E Europe and central Asia, migrating in winter to S Asia. (Jignesh Minaxi)
Great egrets have a wide distribution across the globe. They were killed in large numbers in N America around the end of the 19th century so that their plumes could be used to decorate hats. (Jenny Alvarado)
“Perfect fan” Great egrets have a wide distribution across the globe. They were killed in large numbers in N America around the end of the 19th century so that their plumes could be used to decorate hats. (Jenny Alvarado)
Indian yellow tits are resident secondary cavity-nesters in the open tropical forests of the Indian subcontinent. (Kedar Potnis)
“Splashing action!” Indian yellow tits are resident secondary cavity-nesters in the open tropical forests of the Indian subcontinent. (Kedar Potnis)
Indian peafowls have been in Europe for over 1500 years and have established feral populations across the globe. They are resident breeders across the Indian subcontinent and drier lowland of Sri Lanka. (Satyam Dave)
“Low-level flyer” Indian peafowls have been in Europe for over 1500 years and have established feral populations across the globe. They are resident breeders across the Indian subcontinent and drier lowland of Sri Lanka. (Satyam Dave)
Brown-headed gulls breed on the high plateaus of central Asia from Tajikistan to Inner Mongolia, .wintering on the coasts and large inland lakes of tropical S Asia and the Indian Subcontinent. (Guruprasad M Kambar)
“Quick pose before lunch” Brown-headed gulls breed on the high plateaus of central Asia from Tajikistan to Inner Mongolia, .wintering on the coasts and large inland lakes of tropical S Asia and the Indian Subcontinent. (Guruprasad M Kambar)
Grey-headed bushshrikes prefer the savanna of SubSaharan Africa and are not found in the lowland forests of central Africa and W Africa. (Richard & Eileen Flack / www.theflacks.co.za)
“Symbol of the savanna” Grey-headed bushshrikes prefer the savanna of SubSaharan Africa and are not found in the lowland forests of central Africa and W Africa. (Richard & Eileen Flack / www.theflacks.co.za)
Streaked laughingthrushes are a common sighting in the N regions of the Indian Subcontinent, as well as adjoining areas in Afghanistan, Bhutan, India, Nepal, Pakistan, Russia, and Tajikistan. (Koushik Sreedhar)
“Never miss anything” Streaked laughingthrushes are a common sighting in the N regions of the Indian Subcontinent, as well as adjoining areas in Afghanistan, Bhutan, India, Nepal, Pakistan, Russia, and Tajikistan. (Koushik Sreedhar)
Little corellas avoid thick forests and prefer the arid deserts of central Australia to the eastern coastal plains and are found in N, central, E and SE Australia, the W Cape York Peninsula, and New Guinea. (Lennart Hessel)
“Little lawn specialist” Little corellas avoid thick forests and prefer the arid deserts of central Australia to the eastern coastal plains and are found in N, central, E and SE Australia, the W Cape York Peninsula, and New Guinea. (Lennart Hessel)
Little wattlebirds are a little-known honeyeater found in coastal and sub-coastal SE Australia. (Lennart Hessel)
“Proud song” Little wattlebirds are a little-known honeyeater found in coastal and sub-coastal SE Australia. (Lennart Hessel)
Long-tailed broadbills form loud, sociable flocks in the Himalayas with a distrobutional range that extends E through NE India all the way to SE Asia. (Debapratim Saha)
“Purest color” Long-tailed broadbills form loud, sociable flocks in the Himalayas with a distrobutional range that extends E through NE India all the way to SE Asia. (Debapratim Saha)
虎鶇 Dusky thrushes breed in the mountainous and tundra-edge habitats E from central Siberia and are strongly migratory, wintering S in SE Asia with core populations in China and neighbouring countries. (Louis Yeh)
“Camouflage hunter” 虎鶇 Dusky thrushes breed in the mountainous and tundra-edge habitats E from central Siberia and are strongly migratory, wintering S in SE Asia with core populations in China and neighbouring countries. (Louis Yeh)
Blue-tailed bee-eaters breed throughout SE Asia, but migrate seasonally SW to peninsular India. (Nithya Purushothaman)
“Dust bath!” Blue-tailed bee-eaters breed throughout SE Asia, but migrate seasonally SW to peninsular India. (Nithya Purushothaman)
Great cormorant are one of the most widespread members of the cormorant family, and are also known as the "Great black cormorant" across the N Hemisphere, the black cormorant in Australia, the "large cormorant" in India, and the "black shag" further south in New Zealand. (Pramod CL)
“Man’s best cormorant” Great cormorant are one of the most widespread members of the cormorant family, and are also known as the “Great black cormorant” across the N Hemisphere, the black cormorant in Australia, the “large cormorant” in India, and the “black shag” further south in New Zealand. (Pramod CL)
Rufous-bellied niltavas prefer the subtropical or tropical moist lowland and montane forests of Bangladesh, Bhutan, China, India, Laos, Myanmar, Nepal, Pakistan, and Thailand. (Vijay Sachan)
“Little beauty” Rufous-bellied niltavas prefer the subtropical or tropical moist lowland and montane forests of Bangladesh, Bhutan, China, India, Laos, Myanmar, Nepal, Pakistan, and Thailand. (Vijay Sachan)
Cape parrots are the most endangered parrot in Africa and have a global population of 800 - 1,500 individuals in four small, isolated populations in the remaining Afromontane forests of South Africa. (Rodnick Clifton Biljon)
“Lord of the forest” Cape parrots are the most endangered parrot in Africa and have a global population of 800 – 1,500 individuals in four small, isolated populations in the remaining Afromontane forests of South Africa. (Rodnick Clifton Biljon)
Rock dove prefer open and semi-open habitat with nearby cliffs and rock ledges for roosting and breeding. This adequatekly describes the cities they have occupied across the globe. (Gurum Ekalavya)
“Nothing like the city” Rock dove prefer open and semi-open habitat with nearby cliffs and rock ledges for roosting and breeding. This adequatekly describes the cities they have occupied across the globe. (Gurum Ekalavya)
The Wild Bird Trust would like to thank Swarovski Optik for helping to make the “Top 25 Wild Bird Photographs of the Week” a possibility! Go to the new Wild BirdTrust websitefor a chance to WIN a pair of amazing Swarovski binoculars by donating $10!

See last week “Top 25 Wild Bird Photographs of the Week #63″:

Comments

  1. Dr mathews jacob
    kerala , india
    April 11, 4:47 am

    this is the important massage and photos for all loving nature people. thankyou

  2. Sony
    ambon
    April 9, 12:00 pm

    Saya belajari photografer
    Dengan cara teknik yg bisa ku mampu
    Atas pengrtian yg luar biasa
    Sebab saya berusaha fokus dgn teknik yg bisa ku kuasai

  3. Rich Lindie
    April 9, 4:21 am

    The Thrush labeled Dusky Thrush is not a Dusky Thrush

  4. Sathya Vagale
    Bangalore, India
    April 8, 10:35 pm

    Can u guide me on how I can post Wildlife and Bird pix here.

  5. Nithya Purushothaman
    Kerala
    April 8, 1:46 pm

    Many thanks for including my photo in the Top 25.It’s really a big honor for me..and congrats to all

  6. satyam dave
    Rajkot
    April 8, 1:28 pm

    Happy to be part of this…!

  7. Jignesh Minaxi
    April 8, 11:01 am

    Oh My god… My three images have make it to the week #64… Overwhelmed… Thank you very much wild bird trust :) :)

  8. Lennart Hessel
    Sweden
    April 8, 9:35 am

    Thank you WIld Bird Trust for including two of my pictures among the 25.

    Kind regards
    Lennart Hessel
    http://www.lensman,se

  9. Leah Geue
    Warburton Victoria
    April 8, 9:03 am

    awesome photos my friend simpley awesome :- ) <3 them .Buetifull page .