National Geographic
Menu

Top 25 Wild Bird Photographs of the Week #49

www.swarovskioptik.comEleven out of 25 of this week’s amazing wild bird photographs came from India. There are almost 7,500 Wild Bird Enthusiasts following the Wild Bird Trust Facebook page in India and our five most popular cities in the world are in India. The Indian SubContinent is a birding paradise with a patchwork mosaic of habitat types and terrain for a multitude of bird species. This vast, densely populated country is an example to the world, as they still have some of the world’s most valuable, most pristine wilderness areas with important fauna and flora still represented. Most Indian people are vegetarian and many of their religious beliefs support conservation and the preservation of wild places. This proves that people CAN, to a point, live with wildlife as we have done, in a sense, from the beginning of time… There is, however, conflict between people and wildlife in India with tigers being shot or poached regularly, rhino being killed for their horns, and birds being trapped for bushmeat… Please help us share the beauty and wonder of the wild birds of India (and the world) with as many people as possible…

Get out there and take wild bird photographs for National Geographic’s “The Great Nature Project”! Simply include #greatnature #wildbird when posting new photos… Join the world in celebrating our natural heritage!

See these wild birds in real life with these amazing Swarovski binoculars.

Join the Wild Bird Revolution today!! Be the first to introduce your friends, family and colleagues to the freedom and splendor of birds in the wild! Advances in digital photography have given us the opportunity to capture the beauty and freedom of birds in the wild like never before. Here are the “Top 25 Wild Bird Photographs of the Week” drawn from the hundreds of photographs submitted to the Wild Bird Trust for consideration every week. Celebrate the freedom and splendor of birds in the wild with us and stimulate positive change by sharing how beautiful the birds of the world really are…

Go to the new Wild Bird Trust website and make sure you have a chance to WIN an amazing pair of EL32 Swarovski binoculars! See these wild birds in real life with these amazing Swarovski binoculars…

 

Short-toed snake-eagles have a wide distribution in SW Europe and NW Africa, N to the Gulf of Finland, and E to Central Asia. There are sedentray populations on the Indian Subcontinent. They are habitat generalists and thrive in dense forest and semi-desert. (Pankaj Ratna)

Short-toed snake-eagles have a wide distribution in SW Europe and NW Africa, N to the Gulf of Finland, and E to Central Asia. There are sedentray populations on the Indian Subcontinent. They are habitat generalists and thrive in dense forest and semi-desert. (Pankaj Ratna)

Red bishops are common residents in wetlands and open grasslands south of the Equator. They ae know to roost in their thousands in reedbeds and isoltaed groves of trees. (Sue-Lesley Norgate)

Red bishops are common residents in wetlands and open grasslands south of the Equator. They ae know to roost in their thousands in reedbeds and isoltaed groves of trees. (Sue-Lesley Norgate)

Malachite kingfishers are a relatively common sight along the rivers and waterways of Africa south of the Sahara. (Jay van Rensburg)

Malachite kingfishers are a relatively common sight along the rivers and waterways of Africa south of the Sahara. (Jay van Rensburg)

Nilgiri blue flycatchers are an Old World flycatcher with a very restricted range in the hills of S India. (Kiran Kumar)

Nilgiri blue flycatchers are an Old World flycatcher with a very restricted range in the hills of S India. (Kiran Kumar)

White-throated swallow are common residents in southern Africa that have benefited from the increased nesting habitat provided by the construction of bridges and dams. (Jay van Rensburg)

White-throated swallow are common residents in southern Africa that have benefited from the increased nesting habitat provided by the construction of bridges and dams. (Jay van Rensburg)

White-rumped munias are indigenous to tropical continental Asia and some of the adjacent islands. They were introduced to and have become naturalized in parts of Japan. (Gururaj Moorching)

White-rumped munias are indigenous to tropical continental Asia and some of the adjacent islands. They were introduced to and have become naturalized in parts of Japan. (Gururaj Moorching)

Gentoo penguins are found all along the Antarctic Peninsula and are considered "Near Threatened" after massive declines in the global population over the last 25 years. (Elliot Neep / www.oryxphotography.com)

Gentoo penguins are found all along the Antarctic Peninsula and are considered “Near Threatened” after massive declines in the global population over the last 25 years. (Elliot Neep / www.oryxphotography.com)

Acacia pied barbets are found in Angola, Botswana, Lesotho, Mozambique, Namibia, South Africa, Swaziland, Zambia and Zimbabwe, where they drill holes into dead wood to create nest cavities. (Richard & Eileen Flack)

Acacia pied barbets are found in Angola, Botswana, Lesotho, Mozambique, Namibia, South Africa, Swaziland, Zambia and Zimbabwe, where they drill holes into dead wood to create nest cavities. (Richard & Eileen Flack)

Mountain imperial pigeons are found in Bhutan, Brunei, Cambodia, China, India, Indonesia, Laos, Malaysia, Myanmar, Nepal, Thailand and Vietnam. They prefer subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests, mangroves and moist montane forests. (Anantha Murthy)

Mountain imperial pigeons are found in Bhutan, Brunei, Cambodia, China, India, Indonesia, Laos, Malaysia, Myanmar, Nepal, Thailand and Vietnam. They prefer subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests, mangroves and moist montane forests. (Anantha Murthy)

Cape cormorants are endemic to the SW coastline of Africa where they forage for schooling fish 5-10m below the surface (e.g. pilchards, anchovies and sandeels). (Bianca Preusker)

Cape cormorants are endemic to the SW coastline of Africa where they forage for schooling fish 5-10m below the surface (e.g. pilchards, anchovies and sandeels). (Bianca Preusker)

Black-winged stilts have a wide global distribution and prefer marshes, shallow lakes, floodplain margins, and ponds. Several populations are migratory and move to the coastline in winter, but those in warmer regions are resident or, at most, short-range vagrants. Photographed here in Parco del Ticino (Italy). (Fabio Usvardi)

Black-winged stilts have a wide global distribution and prefer marshes, shallow lakes, floodplain margins, and ponds. Several populations are migratory and move to the coastline in winter, but those in warmer regions are resident or, at most, short-range vagrants. Photographed here in Parco del Ticino (Italy). (Fabio Usvardi)

Cape sugarbirds are among the 6 bird species endemic to the Fynbos biome of the Western Cape and Eastern Cape provinces of South Africa where they are a common sight. (Richard & Eileen Flack)

Cape sugarbirds are among the 6 bird species endemic to the Fynbos biome of the Western Cape and Eastern Cape provinces of South Africa where they are a common sight. (Richard & Eileen Flack)

Egyptian geese are actually large duck and  are locally abundant throughout Africa, only avoiding the deserts and dense forests. (Chris Martin / www.chrismartin.co)

Egyptian geese are actually large duck and are locally abundant throughout Africa, only avoiding the deserts and dense forests. (Chris Martin / www.chrismartin.co)

Crested auklets are distributed throughout the N Pacific and Bering Sea, feeding by diving into deep waters to catch krill and small marine invertebrates. They nest in large, dense colonies of up to 1 million in the Bering Sea and Sea of Okhotsk. (Adam Riley / www.rockjumperbirding.com)

Crested auklets are distributed throughout the N Pacific and Bering Sea, feeding by diving into deep waters to catch krill and small marine invertebrates. They nest in large, dense colonies of up to 1 million in the Bering Sea and Sea of Okhotsk. (Adam Riley / www.rockjumperbirding.com)

Yellow-billed storks are indigenous to Africa S of the Sahara and Madagascar. They are very similar to the painted storks of Asia. (Adam Riley / www.rockjumperbirding.com)

Yellow-billed storks are indigenous to Africa S of the Sahara and Madagascar. They are very similar to the painted storks of Asia. (Adam Riley / www.rockjumperbirding.com)

Vernal hanging parrots are native to the Indian Subcontinent and parts of SE Asia. Local movements are driven mainly by the availability of fruit, seeds, buds and blossoms. (Pranesh Kodancha)

Vernal hanging parrots are native to the Indian Subcontinent and parts of SE Asia. Local movements are driven mainly by the availability of fruit, seeds, buds and blossoms. (Pranesh Kodancha)

Yellow-eyed babblers are gregarious and found in small groups in the open grass and scrub of S Asia. (Subramanya Madhyastha)

Yellow-eyed babblers are gregarious and found in small groups in the open grass and scrub of S Asia. (Subramanya Madhyastha)

Crimson-backed sunbirds are endemic to the W Ghats of India, and are particularly attracted to gardens on the edge of forested areas. (Subramanya Madhyastha)

Crimson-backed sunbirds are endemic to the W Ghats of India, and are particularly attracted to gardens on the edge of forested areas. (Subramanya Madhyastha)

"Solo Skimmer". Black skimmers breed in North and South America. They are the largest of the three skimmer species and well-known for dipping the lower mandible into the water when feeding...(David Lychenheim)

“Solo Skimmer”. Black skimmers breed in North and South America. They are the largest of the three skimmer species and well-known for dipping the lower mandible into the water when feeding…(David Lychenheim)

Black-throated bushtits are distributed from the foothills of the Himalayas from N India to Nepal, Bhutan, N Burma, Vietnam and Taiwan. (Shailesh Sharma)

Black-throated bushtits are distributed from the foothills of the Himalayas from N India to Nepal, Bhutan, N Burma, Vietnam and Taiwan. (Shailesh Sharma)

Tickell's blue flycatchers breed in tropical Asia from the Indian Subcontinent E to SE Asia, preferring dense scrub and forests. (Saminathan Babu)

Tickell’s blue flycatchers breed in tropical Asia from the Indian Subcontinent E to SE Asia, preferring dense scrub and forests. (Saminathan Babu)

The little-known blue-throated barbet are found across the Indian Subcontinent and SE Asia. (Ripan Biswas)

The little-known blue-throated barbet are found across the Indian Subcontinent and SE Asia. (Ripan Biswas)

White-eared barbets are resident cavity-nesters in Kenya, Malawi, Mozambique, South Africa, Swaziland, Tanzania, and Zimbabwe. (Rene Rossouw)

White-eared barbets are resident cavity-nesters in Kenya, Malawi, Mozambique, South Africa, Swaziland, Tanzania, and Zimbabwe. (Rene Rossouw)

California quails are predominantly found in the SW United States, but have now been introduced into British Columbia, Hawaii, Chile and New Zealand, as well as Norfolk and King Islands (Australia). (Owen Deutsch)

California quails are predominantly found in the SW United States, but have now been introduced into British Columbia, Hawaii, Chile and New Zealand, as well as Norfolk and King Islands (Australia). (Owen Deutsch)

Indian coursers are widespread in S Asia, preferring dry stony, scrubby or rocky landscapes from the Indus valley E almost all the way to Bangladesh, as well as S to the tip of Peninsular India. (Mohamed Mothi)

Indian coursers are widespread in S Asia, preferring dry stony, scrubby or rocky landscapes from the Indus valley E almost all the way to Bangladesh, as well as S to the tip of Peninsular India. (Mohamed Mothi)

 

logo-vectorPlease join the Wild Bird Trust page on Facebook or follow us on Twitter to receive all wild bird photo updates and news from our research and conservation projects in the field. Submit your own photos and become part of this important public awareness campaign to bring the magic of wild birds to the world. Prepare to be blown away every week… The Wild Bird Trust was founded in South Africa in August 2009 with the primary objective of keeping birds safe in the wild. The trust aims to encourage the use of flagship endangered bird species as “ecosystem ambassadors” in their indigenous habitat. The trust focusses on linking ordinary people with conservation action in the field through innovative marketing campaigns and brand development. Saving Africa’s birds is going to take a determined effort from all of us.

 

See last week “Top 25 Wild Bird Photographs of the Week #48″: 

Comments

  1. BASAVA
    INDIA
    January 21, 1:17 am

    ALL SHOOTINGS OF BIRDS VERY BEAUTIFUL AND EXCELANCE

  2. SHANTHAKUMAR NAYAK
    Karnataka
    January 6, 3:59 am

    Superb,birds word.i love birds,fantastic photos,

  3. Victor manuel
    Chile
    October 20, 2013, 8:53 pm

    Beatiful, and nice photos

  4. Bells
    Australia
    October 19, 2013, 5:47 pm

    So many beautiful birds. Wonderful photos.

  5. alfonso sierra
    La Ceja Antioquia Colombia
    October 19, 2013, 7:47 am

    10 miles from international airport, safe town with good climate, no malaria, dengue or chicungunya, excellent food, world class medical facilities if ever needed, friendly natives and the best: In the country with the most bird diversity, 1994 species at the last count.

  6. Tanya Nikolaeva
    Bilgaria
    October 11, 2013, 1:47 pm

    Beautiful birds of our beautiful world.

  7. Adele Wright
    Johannesburg
    October 10, 2013, 5:49 am

    They are all magnificent! My favourite is Malachite Kingfisher, a superb photo.