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Top 25 Wild Bird Photographs of the Week #48

www.swarovskioptik.comCuckoos, woodstars, plumeleteers, skimmers, weavers, bee-eaters, grenadiers, laughingthrushes and ground rollers… The wild birds of the world will never cease to astound and amaze. Their natural habitat, however, is disappearing rapidly and most populations are under threat or, at least, in decline. Anyone can walk out their front door and the greener and wetter your surroundings become, the more birds you will see. Many people have an extra pair of old binoculars in a box somewhere. We need to renew efforts to coordinate the collection of as many binoculars as possible for distribution to interested children around the world. This is the only way to open the amazing world of wild birds and inspire lives dedicated to conserving the truly wild places that remain.

Get out there and take wild bird photographs for National Geographic’s “The Great Nature Project”! Simply include #greatnature #wildbird when posting new photos… Join the world in celebrating our natural heritage!

Join the Wild Bird Revolution today!! Be the first to introduce your friends, family and colleagues to the freedom and splendor of birds in the wild! Advances in digital photography have given us the opportunity to capture the beauty and freedom of birds in the wild like never before. Here are the “Top 25 Wild Bird Photographs of the Week” drawn from the hundreds of photographs submitted to the Wild Bird Trust for consideration every week. Celebrate the freedom and splendor of birds in the wild with us and stimulate positive change by sharing how beautiful the birds of the world really are…

Go to the new Wild Bird Trust website and make sure you have a chance to WIN an amazing pair of Swarovski binoculars!

Malabar pied hornbills are resident to tropical S Asia from India and Sri Lanka E to Borneo. Photographed here in Goa (India). (Anantha Murthy)

Malabar pied hornbills are resident to tropical S Asia from India and Sri Lanka E to Borneo. Photographed here in Goa (India). (Anantha Murthy)

Black skimmers breed in both N and S America. Some wintering in the Caribbean and tropical Pacific coastline, while others in S American make only shorter movements in response to annual floods. (Markus Lilje / rockjumperbirding.com)

Black skimmers breed in both N and S America. Some wintering in the Caribbean and tropical Pacific coastline, while others in S American make only shorter movements in response to annual floods. (Markus Lilje / rockjumperbirding.com)

Black-headed orioles breed in much of sub-Saharan Africa from Sudan and Ethiopia all the way down to South Africa. (Richard Flack)

Black-headed orioles breed in much of sub-Saharan Africa from Sudan and Ethiopia all the way down to South Africa. (Richard Flack)

Blue-and-Gold macaws are resident in Venezuela S to Peru, Brazil, Bolivia and Paraguay. They are on the verge of being extirpated from Paraguay, but remain widespread and fairly common in most of their range. (Nina Stavlund)

Blue-and-Gold macaws are resident in Venezuela S to Peru, Brazil, Bolivia and Paraguay. They are on the verge of being extirpated from Paraguay, but remain widespread and fairly common in most of their range. (Nina Stavlund)

Coppersmith barbets are found on the Indian Subcontinent and parts of SE Asia, preferring gardens, groves and sparse woodland. (Anantha Murthy)

Coppersmith barbets are found on the Indian Subcontinent and parts of SE Asia, preferring gardens, groves and sparse woodland. (Anantha Murthy)

Golden-hooded tanagers are found in S Mexico and extend south to W Ecuador. They prefer the canopy of dense forests and semi-open areas like clearings, second growth, and well-vegetated gardens. (George Scott)

Golden-hooded tanagers are found in S Mexico and extend south to W Ecuador. They prefer the canopy of dense forests and semi-open areas like clearings, second growth, and well-vegetated gardens. (George Scott)

Green bee-eaters are a widespread aerial insectivore found across sub-Saharan Africa from Senegal and the Gambia to Ethiopia, the Nile valley, W Arabia and Asia as far as India and Vietnam. (Gurum Ekalavya)

Green bee-eaters are a widespread aerial insectivore found across sub-Saharan Africa from Senegal and the Gambia to Ethiopia, the Nile valley, W Arabia and Asia as far as India and Vietnam. (Gurum Ekalavya)

Southern masked weavers are resident breeders in southern Africa where they prefer shrublands, savanna, grassland, open woodland, inland wetlands, and semi-desert areas. (Louis Groenewald)

Southern masked weavers are resident breeders in southern Africa where they prefer shrublands, savanna, grassland, open woodland, inland wetlands, and semi-desert areas. (Louis Groenewald)

Pitta-like ground rollers are endemic to Madagascar where intensifying deforestation and bushmeat trade threaten this unique species. (Markus Lilje / rockjumperbirding.com)

Pitta-like ground rollers are endemic to Madagascar where intensifying deforestation and bushmeat trade threaten this unique species. (Markus Lilje / rockjumperbirding.com)

Atlantic puffins are the only puffin species native to the Atlantic Ocean. Photographed here on Machias Seal Island (Canada). (Nina Stavlund)

Atlantic puffins are the only puffin species native to the Atlantic Ocean. Photographed here on Machias Seal Island (Canada). (Nina Stavlund)

Bald eagles have a wide range range across most of Canada and Alaska, United States, and N Mexico. Photographed here in Grand Manan (Canada). (Nina Stavlund)

Bald eagles have a wide range range across most of Canada and Alaska, United States, and N Mexico. Photographed here in Grand Manan (Canada). (Nina Stavlund)

Herring gulls or "Smithsonian gulls" breed across N America, preferring coastal areas, lakes, rivers and garbage dumps. (Nina Stavlund)

Herring gulls or “Smithsonian gulls” breed across N America, preferring coastal areas, lakes, rivers and garbage dumps. (Nina Stavlund)

Ospreys are found on all continents except Antarctica. They are uniquely adapted to capture fish and nest in any location near a body of water with an adequate food supply. (Antero Topp)

Ospreys are found on all continents except Antarctica. They are uniquely adapted to capture fish and nest in any location near a body of water with an adequate food supply. (Antero Topp)

Crimson-backed tanagers are found in Colombia, French Guyana, Panama and Venezuela. They prefer subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests, and are called "sangre de toro" ("blood of the bull") in Panama. (Owen Deutsch / owendeutsch.com)

Crimson-backed tanagers are found in Colombia, French Guyana, Panama and Venezuela. They prefer subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests, and are called “sangre de toro” (“blood of the bull”) in Panama. (Owen Deutsch / owendeutsch.com)

Squirrel cuckoos are found in NW Mexico, N Argentina, Uruguay, and on Trinidad. Photographed here in Panama. (Owen Deutsch / owendeutsch.com)

Squirrel cuckoos are found in NW Mexico, N Argentina, Uruguay, and on Trinidad. Photographed here in Panama. (Owen Deutsch / owendeutsch.com)

Purple grenadiers are a common species of estrildid finch found in  Ethiopia, Kenya, Somalia, Sudan, Tanzania and Uganda. (Raj Dhage Wai)

Purple grenadiers are a common species of estrildid finch found in Ethiopia, Kenya, Somalia, Sudan, Tanzania and Uganda. (Raj Dhage Wai)

Purple-rumped sunbirds are endemic to the Indian Subcontinent and characteristically hover for a short period before perching to feed on nectar. (Bheeman Bheeman A)

Purple-rumped sunbirds are endemic to the Indian Subcontinent and characteristically hover for a short period before perching to feed on nectar. (Bheeman Bheeman A)

Red-billed leiothrixes are indigenous to the Indian Subcontinent, but are common cagebird known as Pekin robin, Pekin nightingale, Japanese nightingale, and Japanese robin. Feral populations of escapees have established themselves in Japan and are considered by many to be native. (Caesar Sengupta)

Red-billed leiothrixes are indigenous to the Indian Subcontinent, but are common cagebird known as Pekin robin, Pekin nightingale, Japanese nightingale, and Japanese robin. Feral populations of escapees have established themselves in Japan and are considered by many to be native. (Caesar Sengupta)

Cattle egrets are indigenous to parts of Asia, Africa and Europe. They have done very well with the global increase in beef consumption over the last 100 years. As a result they have undergone rapid range expansion and established themselves in much of the rest of the world (including Australia). Photographed here in W Bengal (india). (Ripan Biswas)

Cattle egrets are indigenous to parts of Asia, Africa and Europe. They have done very well with the global increase in beef consumption over the last 100 years. As a result they have undergone rapid range expansion and established themselves in much of the rest of the world (including Australia). Photographed here in W Bengal (india). (Ripan Biswas)

White-bellied woodstars are common visitors to sugar feeders in Bolivia, Colombia, Ecuador, and Peru. (Adam Riley / rockjumperbirding.com)

White-bellied woodstars are common visitors to sugar feeders in Bolivia, Colombia, Ecuador, and Peru. (Adam Riley / rockjumperbirding.com)

Spanish sparrows are hard to distinguish from the more common house sparrows and are found in found in the Mediterranean region and SW and central Asia. (Arun Viru Kumar)

Spanish sparrows are hard to distinguish from the more common house sparrows and are found in found in the Mediterranean region and SW and central Asia. (Arun Viru Kumar)

Red-headed weavers are monotypic in their genus and their nests are a common sight in the southern African bush all the way up to Malawi and Angola. (Trevor Kleyn / trevorkleyn.com)

Red-headed weavers are monotypic in their genus and their nests are a common sight in the southern African bush all the way up to Malawi and Angola. (Trevor Kleyn / trevorkleyn.com)

White-throated laughingthrushes are resident in Afghanistan, Bhutan, India, Myanmar, Nepal, Pakistan, Tibet and Vietnam. They prefer subtropical or tropical moist montane forests. (Caesar Sengupta)

White-throated laughingthrushes are resident in Afghanistan, Bhutan, India, Myanmar, Nepal, Pakistan, Tibet and Vietnam. They prefer subtropical or tropical moist montane forests. (Caesar Sengupta)

White-vented plumeleteers are found in Colombia, Ecuador, Panama, Peru and Venezuela. They prefer subtropical or tropical dry forests and moist lowland forests. (Owen Deutsch / owendeutsch.com)

White-vented plumeleteers are found in Colombia, Ecuador, Panama, Peru and Venezuela. They prefer subtropical or tropical dry forests and moist lowland forests. (Owen Deutsch / owendeutsch.com)

Ashy prinias are resident breeder on the Indian Subcontinent and are found across most of India, Nepal, Bangladesh, Bhutan, Sri Lanka and western Myanmar. (Yogesh Badri)

Ashy prinias are resident breeder on the Indian Subcontinent and are found across most of India, Nepal, Bangladesh, Bhutan, Sri Lanka and western Myanmar. (Yogesh Badri)

See these wild birds in real life with these amazing Swarovski binoculars.

Go to www.wildbirdtrust.com and you could WIN a pair of EL32 Swarovski binoculars. See these wild birds in real life with these amazing Swarovski binoculars.

 

logo-vectorPlease join the Wild Bird Trust page on Facebook or follow us on Twitter to receive all wild bird photo updates and news from our research and conservation projects in the field. Submit your own photos and become part of this important public awareness campaign to bring the magic of wild birds to the world. Prepare to be blown away every week… The Wild Bird Trust was founded in South Africa in August 2009 with the primary objective of keeping birds safe in the wild. The trust aims to encourage the use of flagship endangered bird species as “ecosystem ambassadors” in their indigenous habitat. The trust focusses on linking ordinary people with conservation action in the field through innovative marketing campaigns and brand development. Saving Africa’s birds is going to take a determined effort from all of us.

See last week “Top 25 Wild Bird Photographs of the Week #47″: 

Comments

  1. Bragadeeshvar V
    Tiruchirapalli , Tamil Nadu , India
    December 21, 2013, 3:19 am

    Superb shots…
    I liked the second shot – Black skimmers breed
    Its taken in awesome angle and Creativity…
    Hats off to the photographer …

  2. Hukam Singh Chauhan
    Nahan Himachal Pradesh INDIA
    October 14, 2013, 4:38 am

    very beautiful shots,these shots are very impressive and motivational for all wild life photographers and wild life and environment conservators

  3. SIR
    October 10, 2013, 7:54 am

    ŮŮŮŮŮŮŮ AMAZING !!!!!!!! THANK YOU VERY MUCH !!!!

  4. Rajesh Desai
    Pune, India
    October 6, 2013, 10:14 pm

    Good Collection….

  5. jacob
    myanmar(bmo)
    October 5, 2013, 3:11 am

    I like this web!….

  6. Vishwas
    Shimoga/Karnataka/India
    October 4, 2013, 5:45 am

    Congratulations Gurum Ekalavya for the awesome capture of the Bee-Eater….

  7. SIR
    October 3, 2013, 11:47 pm

    super photo !!!!!§ AMAZING THANK YOU…. GEORG