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Explorers Share Tales of Epic Fails

As we reflect on 125 years of science and exploration, National Geographic has brought you countless stories of epic adventure and discovery. However, sometimes the stories of epic failure can be just as gripping, if not entertaining. The September issue of National Geographic magazine highlights these stories in an article and photo gallery.

We’ve rounded up three National Geographic Explorers to recount their epic fails for our next Google+ Hangout. Get to know our explorers before next week’s Hangout and then tune in on August 28th at 1p.m. EST (5p.m. UTC) for the their full-blown tales of fails.

For seven years, Paul Racey has scoured Madagascar for the female eastern sucker-footed bat. He never found it. After capturing 298 individuals (sometimes catching the same bat multiple times), each one was male. Thirty years ago, a female bat was discovered and not a single one seen since.

Jill Heinerth was funded by National Geographic in 2010 to explore the Siwa Oasis, one of Egypt’s most isolated settlements known from Alexander the Great’s traverse through the region on his way to conquer the Persian Empire. Jill surmised there would be many unknown caves and oases among the mud brick ruins, but left Egypt without finding her prize.

Two decades ago, while Agustin Fuentes was on an expedition to Borneo searching for the maroon leaf monkey, he became dangerously lost in a dense rainforest. Darkness coming on quickly, he realized he had reached part of the forest no human had ever been. Lost for what seemed like hours, Augustin was eventually led by the hand back to base camp by the most unlikely of creatures…

Get an inside look at the misadventures, missteps, and downright failures that are often a key part of larger National Geographic stories. Send in your questions and they may be asked on air. You may even be invited to appear on-screen and ask your question live. Submit your questions by…

  • Uploading a video question to YouTube with #LetsExplore
  • Posting a question on Google+ or Twitter with #LetsExplore or
  • Commenting directly on this blog post

Follow National Geographic Google+ or return to this blog post to watch the Google+ Hangout Wednesday, August 28th at 1 p.m. EST (5 p.m. UTC).

Photograph by Brian Skerry
One thing that’s imperative in success or failure: you’ve got to keep cool. Photograph by Brian Skerry

 

Other Hangouts From National Geographic

Hangout With Buzz Aldrin and Conrad Anker
Hangout With Explorers on All Seven Continents

Comments

  1. Deborah A. Edwards
    Lake Lanier, Ga.
    August 18, 2013, 10:27 pm

    I grew up reading and using National Geographic Magazine in school, which was given to me by my granny. At 64, I am too old to explore and travel with your magazine, but would have loved to have done so at a much earlier age. However, I was unaware in my youth that a career exploring could be available. My loss. . . .I now send my grandaughter Nat Geo and will make sure she knows of the many exciting adventures waiting for her all over the world and beyond. . .

  2. Chudamani akavaram
    Atlanta
    August 18, 2013, 9:56 pm

    The sense of art and love native to an evolutionary being, fish the man-to-be.

  3. rey
    August 18, 2013, 8:42 pm

    q buena es esa pagina