National Geographic
Menu

Top 10 Headlines Today: Ice-Free Arctic, Rare Reptiles Stolen…

 

The top 10 news stories on our radar today.
Tell
 @NatGeo what you’re reading with #NatGeoDaily

 

  1. Ice-Free Arctic May Be Reality in 2054, Study Says

    “Cruise ships and oil tankers may be sailing through ice-free waters of the Arctic as early as 2054, according to a new study that narrows to a handful of years the uncertainty of when this climate-change milestone will occur.” NBC

    Environment

  2. Rare Reptiles Stolen from Sydney Zoo

    “Australians have been urged to keep a lookout for dozens of exotic animals including an alligator, dragon lizards and a python which were stolen in a late-night theft from a zoo.” The Telegraph

    Animals

  3. Scientists Find How ‘Obesity Gene’ Makes People Fat

    “Scientists have unraveled how a gene long associated with obesity makes people fat by triggering increased hunger, opening up potential new ways to fight a growing global health problem.” Reuters

    Science

  4. Tooth Shows T. Rex Was a Killer

    “A fossil tooth lodged inside a duckbill dinosaur’s tailbones may prove T. rex was a capable predator, scientists say.” National Geographic

    Ancient

  5. Video: Scientists Use Sound Waves to Move Objects

    “Sound waves with frequencies just above human hearing can levitate tiny particles and liquid droplets and even move them around, a team of engineers has demonstrated.” Science Now

    Science

  6. Hobbits’ Size Not Likely Linked to Growth Disorders

    “A new study suggests that the extinct little people known as hobbits were not just modern Homo sapiens with growth disorders but members of a distinct species.” New York Times

    Ancient

  7. Eavesdropping on Endangered Species With iPods

    “This wildlife recording studio is part of a new project to study biodiversity using automated hardware and software.” Wired

    Animals

  8. Magna Carta Copies to be Reunited For First Time

    “The four surviving original copies of Britain’s Magna Carta, the document that first defined government powers as limited by law, will be brought together in 2015 for the first time to mark the charter’s 800-year anniversary.” Reuters

    Archaeology

  9. Who Gets More Mosquito Bites?

    “Scientists are trying to understand what makes certain humans more attractive to the bugs. One expert, molecular vector biologist L.J. Zwiebel, a professor of biological sciences at Vanderbilt University, weighs in.” Wall Street Journal

    People

  10. 10 Lifehacks from 100 Years Ago

    “From steaming out a splinter to stopping a mad dog, here’s how your ancestors handled life’s big problems.” Mental Floss

    Just for Fun