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Top 25 Wild Bird Photographs of the Week #45

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The photographers responsible for this stunning collection of wild bird photographs from around the world should be proud! You have managed to capture the essence of the wonder and ultimate freedom of birds in the wild! These amazing images shows us that each bird is an individual. An individual living wild in a wild environment that can support his or her every need. An individual that is interacting with the photographer. Wild birds live in a perfect, simplistic harmony with nature. They know how to survive day-to-day, season-to-season without any outside assistance. We have lost this skill in our modern lives, depending on each other and not ourselves. Human beings are the primary threat to the idyllic existence of wild birds. We are now able to completely destroy any kind of natural habitat, and we do. We can now kill or catch any kind of wild bird, and we do. We can now alter any ecosystems to our benefit, maybe not benefitting the original occupants that evolved to be there. We do this a lot. We need to make sure that our policies and value systems accommodate the diversity and wonder of wild birds in the future… 

Join the Wild Bird Revolution today!! Be the first to introduce your friends, family and colleagues to the freedom and splendor of birds in the wild! Advances in digital photography have given us the opportunity to capture the beauty and freedom of birds in the wild like never before. Here are the “Top 25 Wild Bird Photographs of the Week” drawn from the hundreds of photographs submitted to the Wild Bird Trust for consideration every week. Celebrate the freedom and splendor of birds in the wild with us and stimulate positive change by sharing how beautiful the birds of the world really are…

 

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Hoopoes found across the vast region of Afro-Eurasia and are most notable for their distinctive 'crown' of feathers and darting flight pattern. (Lennart Hessel)
Hoopoes found across the vast region of Afro-Eurasia and are most notable for their distinctive ‘crown’ of feathers and darting flight pattern. (Lennart Hessel)
Marsh owls are resident breeder in Africa and Madagascar, feeding mainly on insects, but rodents and small birds. (Felix Reinders)
Marsh owls are resident breeder in Africa and Madagascar, feeding mainly on insects, but rodents and small birds. (Felix Reinders)
Torrent ducks are resident breeders in the South American Andes, nesting in small waterside caves and holding territories on fast-flowing mountain rivers (usually above 1,500 metres (4,900 ft)). (Owen Deutsch)
Torrent ducks are resident breeders in the South American Andes, nesting in small waterside caves and holding territories on fast-flowing mountain rivers (usually above 1,500 metres (4,900 ft)). (Owen Deutsch)
Crested pigeons are found throughout mainland Australia (excpet the tropical far north), preferring  grasslands, brush and wooded areas but they can also be seen at watercourses, homestead gardens, pastoral areas, sports grounds, and golf courses. Photographed here in Victoria (Australia). (Radhakrishnan Sadasivam)
Crested pigeons are found throughout mainland Australia (excpet the tropical far north), preferring grasslands, brush and wooded areas but they can also be seen at watercourses, homestead gardens, pastoral areas, sports grounds, and golf courses. Photographed here in Victoria (Australia). (Radhakrishnan Sadasivam)
Common redpolls breed across N parts of North America and Eurasia, preferring thickets or shrubs. They are remarkably resistant to cold temperatures and winter movements are mainly driven by the availability of food. (Nina Stavlund)
Common redpolls breed across N parts of North America and Eurasia, preferring thickets or shrubs. They are remarkably resistant to cold temperatures and winter movements are mainly driven by the availability of food. (Nina Stavlund)
Fire-tufted barbets are found in Indonesia and Malaysia, preferring subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests and subtropical or tropical moist montane forests. (Gururaj Moorching)
Fire-tufted barbets are found in Indonesia and Malaysia, preferring subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests and subtropical or tropical moist montane forests. (Gururaj Moorching)
Chestnut-capped laughingthrushes are found in Indonesia and Malaysia, preferring subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests and subtropical or tropical moist montane forests. (Gururaj Moorching)
Chestnut-capped laughingthrushes are found in Indonesia and Malaysia, preferring subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests and subtropical or tropical moist montane forests. (Gururaj Moorching)
Goliath herons are the world's largest heron and are found throughout sub-Saharan Africa. There are smaller numbers in SW and S Asia. (John Murray)
Goliath herons are the world’s largest heron and are found throughout sub-Saharan Africa. There are smaller numbers in SW and S Asia. (John Murray)
Collared sunbirds breed across most of sub-Saharan Africa, laying two or three eggs in a suspended nest in a tree. (John Murray)
Collared sunbirds breed across most of sub-Saharan Africa, laying two or three eggs in a suspended nest in a tree. (John Murray)
Common buzzards have a distributional range that covers most of Europe, extending into parts of Asia. (Lennart Hessel)
Common buzzards have a distributional range that covers most of Europe, extending into parts of Asia. (Lennart Hessel)
European bee-eaters breed in S Europe and parts of N Africa and W Asia, migrating during winter to tropical Africa, India and Sri Lanka. (Lennart Hessel)
European bee-eaters breed in S Europe and parts of N Africa and W Asia, migrating during winter to tropical Africa, India and Sri Lanka. (Lennart Hessel)
Rosy-faced lovebirds are found in the arid regions of SW Africa (mainly the Namib Desert). A growing feral population has become established in Arizona (USA). Populations have been reduced in some areas by trapping for the pet trade. (Anja Denker)
Rosy-faced lovebirds are found in the arid regions of SW Africa (mainly the Namib Desert). A growing feral population has become established in Arizona (USA). Populations have been reduced in some areas by trapping for the pet trade. (Anja Denker)
Common redshanks are strongly migratory, wintering on coasts around the Mediterranean, on the Atlantic coast of Europe from Great Britain southwards, and in South Asia. Photographed here during breeding season in Utö (Finland). (Antero Topp)
Common redshanks are strongly migratory, wintering on coasts around the Mediterranean, on the Atlantic coast of Europe from Great Britain southwards, and in South Asia. Photographed here during breeding season in Utö (Finland). (Antero Topp)
Bald eagles are found throughout most of Canada and Alaska, as well as most of the United States and N Mexico, prefering large bodies of open water with abundant food supply and old-growth trees for nesting. (Markus Lilje / www.rockjumperbirding.com)
Bald eagles are found throughout most of Canada and Alaska, as well as most of the United States and N Mexico, prefering large bodies of open water with abundant food supply and old-growth trees for nesting. (Markus Lilje / www.rockjumperbirding.com)
Rufous-crowned laughingthrushes are endemic to Taiwan. (Gururaj Moorching)
Rufous-crowned laughingthrushes are endemic to Taiwan. (Gururaj Moorching)
Black-crowned night herons are found throughout much of the planet, except the coldest regions and Australasia. (Stephen Hadley)
Black-crowned night herons are found throughout much of the planet, except the coldest regions and Australasia. (Stephen Hadley)
Black-winged stilts are one of the most extensive circumscription with one species and 5–7 subspecies. Due to their wide distribution and varied appearance they are often called common stilts. Photographed here in the Sultanpur Bird Sanctuary (India). (Mohit Verma)
Black-winged stilts are one of the most extensive circumscription with one species and 5–7 subspecies. Due to their wide distribution and varied appearance they are often called common stilts. Photographed here in the Sultanpur Bird Sanctuary (India). (Mohit Verma)
Bohemian waxwings breed in the coniferous forests found throughout the most N parts of Europe, Asia and W North America. (Nina Stavlund)
Bohemian waxwings breed in the coniferous forests found throughout the most N parts of Europe, Asia and W North America. (Nina Stavlund)
Golden-backed or black-rumped woodpeckers are widely distributed in the Indian Subcontinent and are one of the few woodpeckers that are seen in urban areas. (Raj Sarkar)
Golden-backed or black-rumped woodpeckers are widely distributed in the Indian Subcontinent and are one of the few woodpeckers that are seen in urban areas. (Raj Sarkar)
Red junglefowls are thought to be ancestral to the domestic chicken. They were first domesticated at least five thousand years ago in Asia. (Saravanan Sundaram)
Red junglefowls are thought to be ancestral to the domestic chicken. They were first domesticated at least five thousand years ago in Asia. (Saravanan Sundaram)
Black-naped monarchs breed across much of tropical S Asia from India and Sri Lanka E to Indonesia and the Philippines, preferring thick forests and other well-wooded habitats. (Shishir Saksena)
Black-naped monarchs breed across much of tropical S Asia from India and Sri Lanka E to Indonesia and the Philippines, preferring thick forests and other well-wooded habitats. (Shishir Saksena)
Common kingfishers are split into seven subspecies within a wide distributional range across Eurasia and North Africa. They are resident in much of their range, but migrates from areas where rivers freeze in winter. (Sonal Patil)
Common kingfishers are split into seven subspecies within a wide distributional range across Eurasia and North Africa. They are resident in much of their range, but migrates from areas where rivers freeze in winter. (Sonal Patil)
Coppersmith barbets are best known for their metronomic call that has been likened to a coppersmith striking metal with a hammer. They are resident breeders found in the Indian Subcontinent and parts of SE Asia. (Subramanian Chockalingam)
Coppersmith barbets are best known for their metronomic call that has been likened to a coppersmith striking metal with a hammer. They are resident breeders found in the Indian Subcontinent and parts of SE Asia. (Subramanian Chockalingam)
Bangka's hooded pittas are common in E and SE Asia, as well as maritime SE Asia where they live in different types of forests as well as on plantations and other cultivated areas. (Syahputra Putra)
Bangka’s hooded pittas are common in E and SE Asia, as well as maritime SE Asia where they live in different types of forests as well as on plantations and other cultivated areas. (Syahputra Putra)
White-backed vultures breed in tall trees on the savannah of W and E Africa. In 2012, they were uplisted to Endangered. Photographed here in Liuwa Plain National Park (Zambia). (Paul Godard)
White-backed vultures breed in tall trees on the savannah of W and E Africa. In 2012, they were uplisted to Endangered. Photographed here in Liuwa Plain National Park (Zambia). (Paul Godard)
See these wild birds in real life with these amazing Swarovski binoculars.
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logo-vectorPlease join the Wild Bird Trust page on Facebook or follow us on Twitter to receive all wild bird photo updates and news from our research and conservation projects in the field. Submit your own photos and become part of this important public awareness campaign to bring the magic of wild birds to the world. Prepare to be blown away every week… The Wild Bird Trust was founded in South Africa in August 2009 with the primary objective of keeping birds safe in the wild. The trust aims to encourage the use of flagship endangered bird species as “ecosystem ambassadors” in their indigenous habitat. The trust focusses on linking ordinary people with conservation action in the field through innovative marketing campaigns and brand development. Saving Africa’s birds is going to take a determined effort from all of us.

See last week “Top 25 Wild Bird Photographs of the Week #44″: 

Comments

  1. DR. GURUDAS RAY
    KOLKATA, WEST BENGAL, INDIA
    January 7, 11:23 am

    Charmed on experiencing the stunning photographs of BIRD kingdom. I will be highly pleased if you let me know, how to post bird’s photograph in your site. THANKS.

  2. Stanley Piper
    Gilford, N.H.
    August 4, 2013, 5:56 pm

    What a stunning surprise to stumble into. When I took time to open this e-mail and to be blown away at the incredible pictures of birds such that I had never before seen. A Sunday afternoon, after the Boston Red Sox game, which they won, and then for me to WIN in such an enjoyable screening of these wonderful birds. Now I shall seek them out from now on. Thank you so much!

  3. Yvonne Pietersen
    South Africa
    July 28, 2013, 4:08 am

    Thank you, some outstanding photos in this selection

  4. k.g.gowathaman
    INDIA,TAMINADU,KANCHIPURAM
    July 27, 2013, 9:55 pm

    This wild birds program is verygood and public awareness,photography improvement me and others,thanks to NAT GEO.

  5. SIR
    July 27, 2013, 12:14 pm

    super PHOTO AMAZING!!!!!§

  6. Anja Denker
    July 19, 2013, 7:36 am

    thanks for including my rosy-faced lovebird, greatly appreciated!!

  7. David C. Stumpo
    Sterling,Connecticut, USA
    July 16, 2013, 10:49 am

    Beautiful Birds! Beautiful Photography! Thanks

  8. Rene Denis
    Mérida, Yucatán, México
    July 15, 2013, 1:19 pm

    I like your photos.
    How can submit some of mine from the Yucatán Península??

  9. k.g.gowathaman
    kanchipuram
    July 15, 2013, 11:40 am

    All stills very nice,but no different photos.But I hoped all photographer’s,Thanks to NAT GEO.

  10. samir desani
    Bhavnagar, India
    July 15, 2013, 11:08 am

    All 25 shots are awesome, I like the most Fire-tufted barbets, Black-naped monarchs, Rosy-faced lovebird, European bee-eater, Chestnut-capped laughingthrushes, Crested pigeons, thanks to Anja Denker, Shishir Saksena,
    Lennart Hessel and to all also!!!!!!!

  11. Lennart Hessel
    Sweden
    July 15, 2013, 6:58 am

    Thank you Wild Bird Trust for including 3 of my photos.

    Kind regards

    Lennart Hessel
    http://www.lensman.se