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Endangered sloths in Central Park?

Critically Endangered pygmy three-toed sloth.  image: Craig Turner/ZSL

The Critically Endangered pygmy three-toed sloth lives in one place on earth and that place is under pressure.
image: Craig Turner/ZSL

Ten years ago, the pygmy three-toed sloth (Bradypus Pygmaeus) lived undisturbed ten miles off the coast of Panama on a tiny island the size of Central Park in New York City. Now that’s changed and the pint-sized slowpokes are teetering on the edge of extinction.

The tiny island of Escudo de Veraguas ten miles off Panama is about 3.4 square miles, a Central Park in the Caribbean.  image: Craig Turner/ZSL/LightHawk

The tiny island of Escudo de Veraguas ten miles off Panama is about 3.4 square miles, a Central Park in the Caribbean.
image: Craig Turner/ZSL/LightHawk

In mid-March, a volunteer pilot from LightHawk, flew a donated flight with the Zoological Society of London to map the sloth’s remaining habitat on the island which is mostly inaccessible on foot.

More than a pretty picture, the coastline of Escudo de Veraguas supports red mangrove colonies, the primary food source for the pygmy three-toed sloth.  image: Craig Turner/ZSL/LightHawk

More than a pretty picture, the coastline of Escudo de Veraguas supports red mangrove colonies, the primary food source for the pygmy three-toed sloth.
image: Craig Turner/ZSL/LightHawk

Exploring the entire island from the air enabled scientists to quickly identify imminent threats and pressure points. The information the scientists brought back will help create a conservation plan to protect the sloth’s only home.

The Critically Endangered pygmy three-toed sloth only eats red mangrove leaves and can stay in one tree for up to 36 hours. When mangroves are cut down, the slow-moving sloths must descend to the ground to find another tree and risk predation. image: Craig Turner/ZSL/LightHawk

The Critically Endangered pygmy three-toed sloth only eats red mangrove leaves and can stay in one tree for up to 36 hours. When mangroves are cut down for firewood, the slow-moving sloths must descend to the ground to find another tree and risk predation.
image: Craig Turner/ZSL/LightHawk

Find out more about the pygmy three-toed sloth and how you can help.

Comments

  1. blu
    December 18, 2013, 2:23 pm

    love sloths

  2. ReformaIdeal
    Madrid
    April 15, 2013, 12:57 pm

    Es espectacular lo que podemos tener en este mundo
    Saludos
    Microcemento Madrid