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Top 25 Photographs from the Wilderness #10

Explore the wilderness with us… This week we share the “golden wilderness”! The rich colors and textures of the wild can never be replaced or surpassed. Within the next 10-15 years we will see the last-remaining wilderness area on earth dominated by the demands of growing human populations and undermined by accelerated climate change. When the earth’s last wild places are gone, all we will have are fenced off protected areas dependent on constant intervention to persist and marginalized by the demands of sustained development in emerging markets. Guides, rangers, researchers, ecotourists, photographers, artists and conservationists around the world apply themselves everyday to sharing, studying, photographing, writing about, protecting, conserving and celebrating the “wild” with their guests, co-workers, colleagues, and local communities. These amazing photographs are a window into their world, a world where the lions, elephants, orangutans and leopards still reign supreme and we can dream of that perfect morning in the wilderness.

 

Ranger Diaries and The Bush Boyes have teamed up to bring you the “Top 25 Photographs from the Wilderness”. These stunning photographs are selected from hundreds of submissions and are intended to bring the beauty, freedom and splendor of the wilderness to as many people as possible around the world. Please submit your best photographs from the wildest places to the The Bush Boyes Facebook page or Ranger Diaries website, and stand a chance of being featured in the “Top 25 Photographs from the Wilderness” published each week. This initiative is all about SHARING and CARING about wild places. Please “Like” this blog post and share this link with as many people as possible… So begins the “Ranger Revolution”… Anyone can be an “Honorary Ranger” if they share and care about the wilderness, stimulating positive change for wild places around the world… Join the “Ranger Revolution” now!

 

“Like” the Bush Boyes or Ranger Diaries Facebook page before 9 April and you could WIN an amazing SUUNTO Compass!!! Christopher Sebastian is the WINNER from last week! Follow both these pages and always be eligible to WIN great prizes with the “Top 25 Photographs from the Wilderness”…

 

"Swimming the gauntlet", by guide Matthew Copham. Lions do not like crossing the water, where they relinquish their position as the alpha predator. The look in their eyes says it all. Photographed at Wilderness Safaris Duba Plains, in the Okavango Delta, Botswana. (Matthew Copham / safarifootprints.com)
“Swimming the gauntlet”, by guide Matthew Copham. Lions do not like crossing the water, where they relinquish their position as the alpha predator. The look in their eyes says it all. Photographed at Wilderness Safaris Duba Plains, in the Okavango Delta, Botswana. (Matthew Copham / safarifootprints.com)

 

“If you are planning for a year, sow rice; if you are planning for a decade, plant trees; if you are planning for a lifetime, educate people.” — Chinese Proverb

 

"Shy cub", by guide Brendon Cremer. “We were extremely lucky to come across this shy young leopard hiding in the fork of a tree. Although you see signs and sometimes even hear the calls of leopards at Duba, they are a very uncommon sight, so to be able to spend about twenty minutes with him was a great pleasure. Photographed at Wilderness Safaris Duba Plains, Okavango Delta, Botswana. (Brendon Cremer / brendoncremerphotography.com/ wilderness-safaris.com)
“Shy cub”, by guide Brendon Cremer. “We were extremely lucky to come across this shy young leopard hiding in the fork of a tree. Although you see signs and sometimes even hear the calls of leopards at Duba, they are a very uncommon sight, so to be able to spend about twenty minutes with him was a great pleasure. Photographed at Wilderness Safaris Duba Plains, Okavango Delta, Botswana. (Brendon Cremer / brendoncremerphotography.com/ wilderness-safaris.com)

 

“Nature is a self-made machine, more perfectly automated than any automated machine. To create something in the image of nature is to create a machine, and it was by learning the inner working of nature that man became a builder of machines.” – Eric Hoffer

 

"Dancing baboons" by guide Calvin Kotze. Two baboons playing at sunset in the Kruger Park, South Africa. (Calvin Kotze / sabisabi.com)
“Dancing baboons” by guide Calvin Kotze. Two baboons playing at sunset in the Kruger Park, South Africa. (Calvin Kotze / sabisabi.com)

 

“He that plants trees loves others besides himself.” – Thomas Fuller

 

"New day, new hope." by Dana Allen. The start of a new day on the Masai Mara. Photographed at Maras Plains Camp, Kenya. (Dana Allen / photosafari-africa.net/ greatplainsconservation.com)
“New day, new hope.” by Dana Allen. The start of a new day on the Masai Mara. Photographed at Maras Plains Camp, Kenya. (Dana Allen / photosafari-africa.net/ greatplainsconservation.com)

 

“When one tugs at a single thing in nature, he find it attached to the rest of the world.” – John Muir

 

"The bull", by Mario Moreno. “A large bull elephant grazing on the open savannas. The sky was overcast almost every day during our safari which in my opinion made for excellent photography.” Photographed in the Kruger Park, South Africa. (Mario Moreno / marionmorenophotography)
“The bull”, by Mario Moreno. “A large bull elephant grazing on the open savannas. The sky was overcast almost every day during our safari which in my opinion made for excellent photography.” Photographed in the Kruger Park, South Africa. (Mario Moreno / marionmorenophotography)

 

“He who sits in the shade won’t take an axe to the tree.” — Chinese Proverb

 

"Leopard cub", by guide Gavin Lautenbach. Photographed at Londolozi, Sabi Sands, South Africa. (Gavin Lautenbach / mammothsafaris.com/ londolozi.com)
“Leopard cub”, by guide Gavin Lautenbach. Photographed at Londolozi, Sabi Sands, South Africa. (Gavin Lautenbach / mammothsafaris.com/ londolozi.com)

 

“The flow of water and the future of human beings are uncertain.” — Japanese Proverb

 

"Looking the wrong way", by guide Kyle de Nobrega. Rhino calf and lions, by Kyle de Nobrega. Photographed at Lion Sands, Sabi Sands, South Africa. (Kyle de Nobrega / lionsands.com/ inthestixx.com)
“Looking the wrong way”, by guide Kyle de Nobrega. Rhino calf and lions, by Kyle de Nobrega. Photographed at Lion Sands, Sabi Sands, South Africa. (Kyle de Nobrega / lionsands.com/ inthestixx.com)

 

“How I do love the earth. I feel it thrill under my feet. I feel somehow as if it were conscious of my love, as if something passed into my dancing blood from it.” – James Russell Lowell

 

"Dust storm cheetah", by Andre Marais. Photographed in the Kgalagadi Trans-frontier Park, Kalahari, South Africa/Botswana. (Andre Marais)
“Dust storm cheetah”, by Andre Marais. Photographed in the Kgalagadi Trans-frontier Park, Kalahari, South Africa/Botswana. (Andre Marais)

 

“When we plant a tree, we are doing what we can to make our planet a more wholesome and happier dwelling place for those who come after us, if not for ourselves.” – Oliver Wendell Holmes

 

"Lily reflection", by guide Andrew Schoeman. A Waterlilly in the Okavango Delta, Botswana. The water was calm and offered a great reflection of the flower. (Andrew Schoeman / andrewschoemanphotography.co.za)
“Lily reflection”, by guide Andrew Schoeman. A Waterlilly in the Okavango Delta, Botswana. The water was calm and offered a great reflection of the flower. (Andrew Schoeman / andrewschoemanphotography.co.za)To the wisest man, wide as is his vision. Nature remains of quite infinite depth, of quite infinite expansion and all experience thereof limits itself to some few computed centuries and measured square miles.

 

“To the wisest man, wide as is his vision. Nature remains of quite infinite depth, of quite infinite expansion and all experience thereof limits itself to some few computed centuries and measured square miles.” – Thomas Carlyle

 

"Buffalo herd", by guide Brendon Cremer. “A large herd of buffalo moves out of the thickets led by their path finder onto the open flood plains of Puku Flats as the sun sets along the banks of the Chobe River, Botswana. Due to the peak dry season environment, the dust from the herd was immense, creating a fantastic mood as the last rays of light shone through.” (Brendon Cremer / brendoncremerphotography.com)
“Buffalo herd”, by guide Brendon Cremer. “A large herd of buffalo moves out of the thickets led by their path finder onto the open flood plains of Puku Flats as the sun sets along the banks of the Chobe River, Botswana. Due to the peak dry season environment, the dust from the herd was immense, creating a fantastic mood as the last rays of light shone through.” (Brendon Cremer / brendoncremerphotography.com)

 

“You will find something far greater in the woods than you will find in books. Stones and trees will teach you that which you will never learn from masters.” – St. Bernard

 

"Portrait of a saddle-billed stork", by Martin Heigan. (Martin Heigan / anti-matter-3d.com)
“Portrait of a saddle-billed stork”, by Martin Heigan. (Martin Heigan / anti-matter-3d.com)

 

“Yesterday’s flowers are today’s dreams.” – Japanese Proverb

 

"Something different", by guide Marco Tonoli. Using a well-developed sense of smell to locate its food, the ground pangolin will dig into termite and ant nests with its powerful claws to expose its food. It’s tongue is long and rounded, and attached by muscles to a free floating cartilaginous structure which in turn is triggered by a series of muscles running the length of the body. This allows for an enormous extension of the tongue which, with its accessory muscle structure, can be longer than the head and body. It’s sticky tongue is extended into the nest and withdrawn with adults, larvae and pupae, as well as large amounts of grit, attached. They have no teeth and the ingested food is ground up by its muscular stomach with the assistance of the ingested grit. Photographed at Tswalu Kalahari, South Africa. (Marco Tonoli / 4elements.co.za / tswalu.com)
“Something different”, by guide Marco Tonoli. Using a well-developed sense of smell to locate its food, the ground pangolin will dig into termite and ant nests with its powerful claws to expose its food. It’s tongue is long and rounded, and attached by muscles to a free floating cartilaginous structure which in turn is triggered by a series of muscles running the length of the body. This allows for an enormous extension of the tongue which, with its accessory muscle structure, can be longer than the head and body. It’s sticky tongue is extended into the nest and withdrawn with adults, larvae and pupae, as well as large amounts of grit, attached. They have no teeth and the ingested food is ground up by its muscular stomach with the assistance of the ingested grit. Photographed at Tswalu Kalahari, South Africa. (Marco Tonoli / 4elements.co.za / tswalu.com)

 

“Water spilled can never be retrieved.” – Chinese Proverb

 

"Rhino greeting", by guide Matthew Copham (Matthew Copham / safarifootprints.com)
“Rhino greeting”, by guide Matthew Copham (Matthew Copham / safarifootprints.com)

 

“The laws of nature are written deep in the folds and faults of the earth. By encouraging men to learn those laws one can lead them further to a knowledge of the author of all laws.” – John Joseph Lynch

 

"Making a splash", by guide Matthew Copham (Matthew Copham / safarifootprints.com)
“Making a splash”, by guide Matthew Copham (Matthew Copham / safarifootprints.com)

 

“Once a tree falls, the monkeys on it will scatter.” — Chinese Proverb

 

"The stretch", by guide Andrew Schoeman. A giraffe reaches up high to feed on those leaves not taken by smaller giraffe and elephants. Photographed in the Masai Mara, Kenya. (Andrew Schoeman / andrewschoemanphotography.co.za)
“The stretch”, by guide Andrew Schoeman. A giraffe reaches up high to feed on those leaves not taken by smaller giraffe and elephants. Photographed in the Masai Mara, Kenya. (Andrew Schoeman / andrewschoemanphotography.co.za)

 

“Some people like to make of life a garden, and to walk only within its paths.” – Japanese Proverb

 

"Waiting for the rain", by Marina Cano. Lonely wanderer photographed in the Masai Mara, Kenya. (Marina Cano / marinacano.com)
“Waiting for the rain”, by Marina Cano. Lonely wanderer photographed in the Masai Mara, Kenya. (Marina Cano / marinacano.com)

 

“Where there is fish, there is water.” – Chinese Proverb

 

"Okavango leopard", by guide Lee Whittam. “This was one of the many top-quality leopard sightings we had on a recent ten day safari to Botswana. This female in picture was preparing for her evening hunt, we had followed her for most of the afternoon when she chose this sausage tree to climb and get a better view of the area. We made the most of the colourful back ground to get a great silhouette of her before she dropped to the ground. (Lee Whittam / essentialafrica.co.za)
“Okavango leopard”, by guide Lee Whittam. “This was one of the many top-quality leopard sightings we had on a recent ten day safari to Botswana. This female in picture was preparing for her evening hunt, we had followed her for most of the afternoon when she chose this sausage tree to climb and get a better view of the area. We made the most of the colourful back ground to get a great silhouette of her before she dropped to the ground. (Lee Whittam / essentialafrica.co.za)

 

“Nature is an endless combination and repetition of a very few laws.” – Ralph Waldo Emerson

 

"Fish eagle by-pass", by guide Brendon Cremer. “This fish eagle swooped down passed us while chasing an intruding eagle out of his territory.” Photographed on the Chobe River Botswana. (Brendon Cremer / brendoncremerphotography.com)
“Fish eagle by-pass”, by guide Brendon Cremer. “This fish eagle swooped down passed us while chasing an intruding eagle out of his territory.” Photographed on the Chobe River Botswana. (Brendon Cremer / brendoncremerphotography.com)

 

“The world is the world for the world.” – Japanese Proverb

 

Shoebill by guide Lee Whittam. Their numbers are estimated at between 5,000 and 8,000 individuals, the majority of which live in swamps in Sudan, Uganda, DRC, and Zambia. They are classified as vulnerable with the main threats being habitat distruction, disturbance and hunting. Photographed in Uganda. (Lee Whittam / essentialafrica.com)
Shoebill by guide Lee Whittam. Their numbers are estimated at between 5,000 and 8,000 individuals, the majority of which live in swamps in Sudan, Uganda, DRC, and Zambia. They are classified as vulnerable with the main threats being habitat distruction, disturbance and hunting. Photographed in Uganda. (Lee Whittam / essentialafrica.com)

 

“In all things of nature there is something of the marvelous.” – Aristotle

 

"Lion looking across golden plains", photographed by guide Keith Connelly at Marataba, Kruger Park, South Africa. (Keith Connelly)
“Lion looking across golden plains”, photographed by guide Keith Connelly at Marataba, Kruger Park, South Africa. (Keith Connelly)

 

“All Nature wears one universal grin.” – Henry Fielding

 

"Cheetah with cubs" by guide Gavin Lautenbach (Gavin Lautenbach / mammothsafaris.com)
“Cheetah with cubs” by guide Gavin Lautenbach (Gavin Lautenbach / mammothsafaris.com)The wind, a sightless laborer, whistles at his task.

 

“The wind, a sightless laborer, whistles at his task.” – William Wordsworth

 

 

"A grand view", by guide Keith Connelly. A young male leopard rises from his resting perch to begin the night’s activities. Photographed at Lion Sands, Sabi Sands, South Africa. (Keith Connelly / lionssands.com)
“A grand view”, by guide Keith Connelly. A young male leopard rises from his resting perch to begin the night’s activities. Photographed at Lion Sands, Sabi Sands, South Africa. (Keith Connelly / lionssands.com)

 

“Come forth into the light of things, Let Nature be your teacher.” William Wordsworth

 

"Adventurous cheetah cubs", by guide James Souchon. “Enjoying a drink and a little run around, these two little cubs make the most of the late afternoon sunshine.” Photographed at AndBeyond Phinda, KwaZulu Natal, South Africa. (James Souchon / andbeyond.com)
“Adventurous cheetah cubs”, by guide James Souchon. “Enjoying a drink and a little run around, these two little cubs make the most of the late afternoon sunshine.” Photographed at AndBeyond Phinda, KwaZulu Natal, South Africa. (James Souchon / andbeyond.com)

 

“The Amen! of Nature is always a flower.” – Oliver Wendall Holmes

 

"The stare down" by guide Kyle de Nobrega. A precious moment caught between a white rhino and a blacksmith plover. Photographed at Lion Sands, Sabi Sands, South Africa. (Kyle de Nobrega / lionssands.com / inthestixx.com)
“The stare down” by guide Kyle de Nobrega. A precious moment caught between a white rhino and a blacksmith plover. Photographed at Lion Sands, Sabi Sands, South Africa. (Kyle de Nobrega / lionssands.com / inthestixx.com)

 

“The sky is the daily bread of the eyes.” – Ralph Waldo Emerson

 

"Drinking cub" by guide Greg McCall-Peat, Balule, Kruger Park, South Africa. (Greg McCall-Peat)
“Drinking cub” by guide Greg McCall-Peat, Balule, Kruger Park, South Africa. (Greg McCall-Peat)

 

“Every year, my brother (Chris Boyes), Pete (“the Nare”) Hugo, Giles (“Prince William”) Trevethick and I (Dr Steve Boyes) cross the Okavango Delta, top to bottom, on mokoros (dug-out canoes) to survey the distribution and abundance of wetland birds, advocate for World Heritage Status, and share this amazing wilderness with accompanying scientists, explorers and special guests. My wife, Dr Kirsten Wimberger, joined us for the first time this year. No one will forget what happened on the 2012 expedition…”

See: http://newswatch.nationalgeographic.com/2012/07/26/bush-boyes-on-expedition-okavango-wetland-bird-survey/

In 2013, we are embarking on the Okavango River Expedition. This will be a 1,750km odyssey down the Okavango River from the source near Huambo (Angola) all the way down the catchment, across the Caprivi Strip (Namibia), and into Botswana to cross the Okavango Delta via one of our planet’s last untouched wilderness areas. Our objective is to support the Okavango World Heritage Project and achieve UNESCO World Heritage Status for the Okavango Delta and the entire catchment. See: http://www.okavangofilm.com/

 

“Like” the Bush Boyes page and stand a chance to WIN one of two amazing Citizen watches… Go to: http://www.facebook.com/bushboyes

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