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Top 25 Wild Bird Photographs of the Week #40

“A celebration of bird in flight” This photograph of a bald eagle and heron flying in perfect formation shows us why we should all want to be birds… The eagle is chasing the heron away from a nest with eggs, but still manages to do this with grace and power. If the policies we use to govern this planet do not accommodate a safe future for all wild bird populations, we will be doing ourselves a great disservice… We have the choice to make a difference right now. Join the “Wild Bird Revolution”!! Our network of wild bird enthusiasts is growing everyday with almost 20,000 followers on Facebook and photographers from around the world! Birds can fly and many migrate across the planet. Seeing them, in these photographs, throughout their distributional ranges makes the world seem like a much smaller place. Birds knew that the world was round and that we only have one planet many millions of years before we discovered these truths. We need to do everything we can to protect the intact forests, wetlands and protected areas that wild birds around the world depend on…  

 

Join the Wild Bird Revolution today!! Be the first to introduce your friends, family and colleagues to the freedom and splendor of birds in the wild! Advances in digital photography have given us the opportunity to capture the beauty and freedom of birds in the wild like never before. Here are the “Top 25 Wild Bird Photographs of the Week” drawn from the thousands of photographs submitted to the Wild Bird Trust for consideration every week. Celebrate the freedom and splendor of birds in the wild with us and stimulate positive change by sharing how beautiful the birds of the world really are…

 

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"This award-winning photograph was taken by Owen Deutsch in Fox Lake, IL and is a North American Nature Photography Association (NANPA) 2011 Top 10 Showcase Winner. This Bald Eagle was chasing the Great Blue Heron away from the eggs in her nest. It wasn't trying to kill the Heron or she would have done so long before this once in a lifetime shot was captured." (Owen Deutsch / owendeutsch.com)
“This award-winning photograph was taken by Owen Deutsch in Fox Lake, IL and is a North American Nature Photography Association (NANPA) 2011 Top 10 Showcase Winner. This Bald Eagle was chasing the Great Blue Heron away from the eggs in her nest. It wasn’t trying to kill the Heron or she would have done so long before this once in a lifetime shot was captured.” (Owen Deutsch / owendeutsch.com)
Asian koels are found in S Asia, China, and SE Asia. They are brood parasite that lays its eggs in the nests of crows and other hosts that raise their young. (Anantha Murthy)
Asian koels are found in S Asia, China, and SE Asia. They are brood parasite that lays its eggs in the nests of crows and other hosts that raise their young. (Anantha Murthy)
Cape parrots are endemic to South Africa and with little food left in their natural habitat they are struggling to bring back population levels since a collapse in the 1980s. (Rodnick Clifton Biljon / Cape Parrot Project)
Cape parrots are endemic to South Africa and with little food left in their natural habitat they are struggling to bring back population levels since a collapse in the 1980s. (Rodnick Clifton Biljon / Cape Parrot Project)
Snow geese breed north of the timberline in Greenland, Canada, Alaska, and the NE tip of Siberia, wintering in warmer parts of North America from SW British Columbia through parts of the United States to Mexico. Photographed here in Ontario (Canada). global ppoulation is increasing after decades of hunting to over 5 million. (Nina Stavlund)
Snow geese breed north of the timberline in Greenland, Canada, Alaska, and the NE tip of Siberia, wintering in warmer parts of North America from SW British Columbia through parts of the United States to Mexico. Photographed here in Ontario (Canada). global ppoulation is increasing after decades of hunting to over 5 million. (Nina Stavlund)
Blue-throated barbets are distributed across the Indian Subcontinent and Southeast Asia. Photographed here in the Garo hills in Meghalaya (NE India). (Israel Momin)
Blue-throated barbets are distributed across the Indian Subcontinent and Southeast Asia. Photographed here in the Garo hills in Meghalaya (NE India). (Israel Momin)
Black-naped monarchs breed across tropical S Asia from India and Sri Lanka E to Indonesia and the Philippines, preferring thick forests and other well-wooded habitat types. Photographed here in the W Ghats (India). (Shishir Saksena)
Black-naped monarchs breed across tropical S Asia from India and Sri Lanka E to Indonesia and the Philippines, preferring thick forests and other well-wooded habitat types. Photographed here in the W Ghats (India). (Shishir Saksena)
Least terns breed in N America and locally in N South America, migrating to Central America, the Caribbean and South America. Photographed here in Quintana (Texas, USA). (Dan Pancamo / blog.pancamo.com)
Least terns breed in N America and locally in N South America, migrating to Central America, the Caribbean and South America. Photographed here in Quintana (Texas, USA). (Dan Pancamo / blog.pancamo.com)
Eurasian jays occur over a vast distributional range from W Europe and NW Africa to the Indian Subcontinent and further to the E seaboard of Asia and down into SE Asia. (Lennart Hessel / www.lensman.se)
Eurasian jays occur over a vast distributional range from W Europe and NW Africa to the Indian Subcontinent and further to the E seaboard of Asia and down into SE Asia. (Lennart Hessel / www.lensman.se)
Volcano hummingbirds breed only in the mountains of Costa Rica and Chiriqui, Panama. During the breeding season the males perch conspicuously in open areas with flowers and defend their feeding territories aggressively with diving displays. (Nina Stavlund)
Volcano hummingbirds breed only in the mountains of Costa Rica and Chiriqui, Panama. During the breeding season the males perch conspicuously in open areas with flowers and defend their feeding territories aggressively with diving displays. (Nina Stavlund)
Greater racket-tailed drongos extend from the W Himalayas to the E Himalayas and Mishmi Hills in the foothills. They are also found on the islands of Borneo and Java. Photographed here in Kerala (India). (Kamal Hari Menon)
Greater racket-tailed drongos extend from the W Himalayas to the E Himalayas and Mishmi Hills in the foothills. They are also found on the islands of Borneo and Java. Photographed here in Kerala (India). (Kamal Hari Menon)
Greater flamingos are the most widespread species of flamingo found in parts of Africa, S Asia (coastal regions of Pakistan and India), and S Europe (including Spain, Albania, Turkey, Greece, Cyprus, Portugal, Italy and the Camargue region of France). (Guido Muratore)
Greater flamingos are the most widespread species of flamingo found in parts of Africa, S Asia (coastal regions of Pakistan and India), and S Europe (including Spain, Albania, Turkey, Greece, Cyprus, Portugal, Italy and the Camargue region of France). (Guido Muratore)
Malachite sunbirds are found throughout Africa, the Middle East, and SE Asia. They are also called "Green Sugarbirds". (Louis Groenewald)
Malachite sunbirds are found throughout Africa, the Middle East, and SE Asia. They are also called “Green Sugarbirds”. (Louis Groenewald)
Ring-billed gulls breed near lakes, rivers or the coast in Canada and the N United States, preferring nest colonies on the ground, often on islands. They are migratory and most move south to the Gulf of Mexico and the Atlantic and Pacific coasts of North America, also the Great Lakes. (Nina Stavlund)
Ring-billed gulls breed near lakes, rivers or the coast in Canada and the N United States, preferring nest colonies on the ground, often on islands. They are migratory and most move south to the Gulf of Mexico and the Atlantic and Pacific coasts of North America, also the Great Lakes. (Nina Stavlund)
The little-known silver-breasted broadbill occurs at a range of elavations across its distributional range. Living between 800–2,000 metres (2,600–6,600 ft) in Sumatra, but dropping to 300–700 m (980–2,300 ft) in China. (Gururaj Moorching)
The little-known silver-breasted broadbill occurs at a range of elavations across its distributional range. Living between 800–2,000 metres (2,600–6,600 ft) in Sumatra, but dropping to 300–700 m (980–2,300 ft) in China. (Gururaj Moorching)
Snowy egrets breed in large inland and coastal wetlands from the lower Great Lakes and SW United States to South America. Photographed here in the Florida Keys Wild Bird Center. (J. Bernardo Sánchez)
Snowy egrets breed in large inland and coastal wetlands from the lower Great Lakes and SW United States to South America. Photographed here in the Florida Keys Wild Bird Center. (J. Bernardo Sánchez)
Spot-billed pelicans breeds in S Asia from S Pakistan across India east to Indonesia, preferring large inland and coastal waters, especially large lakes. (Yogi Badri)
Spot-billed pelicans breeds in S Asia from S Pakistan across India east to Indonesia, preferring large inland and coastal waters, especially large lakes. (Yogi Badri)
Ultramarine flycatchers are common breeding migrants to W Himalayas from Jammu, Kashmir and Himachal Pradesh to Uttarakhand, wintering in S India. (Debojit Deb)
Ultramarine flycatchers are common breeding migrants to W Himalayas from Jammu, Kashmir and Himachal Pradesh to Uttarakhand, wintering in S India. (Debojit Deb)
White-throated kingfishers are common throughout their wide distributed in Eurasia from Bulgaria, Turkey, W Asia all the way to the Indian Subcontinent and the Philippines. Photographed here on Salt Lake (West Bengal, India). (Raj Sarkar)
White-throated kingfishers are common throughout their wide distributed in Eurasia from Bulgaria, Turkey, W Asia all the way to the Indian Subcontinent and the Philippines. Photographed here on Salt Lake (West Bengal, India). (Raj Sarkar)
Cape grassbirds breed in S Africa in South Africa, Lesotho, Mozambique and Swaziland with an isolated population in E Zimbabwe. They prefer coastal and mountain fynbos and long, rank grass on mountain slopes or in river valleys. Photographed here in the Western Cape (South Africa). (Trevor Kleyn / www.trevorkleyn.com)
Cape grassbirds breed in S Africa in South Africa, Lesotho, Mozambique and Swaziland with an isolated population in E Zimbabwe. They prefer coastal and mountain fynbos and long, rank grass on mountain slopes or in river valleys. Photographed here in the Western Cape (South Africa). (Trevor Kleyn / www.trevorkleyn.com)
Great spotted woodpeckers are distributed throughout Europe and N Asia, and are usually resident year-round except in the colder parts of their range. Nesting trees chosen by this woodpecker almost invariably have soft heartwood and tough sapwood, often due to parasites or diseases that weaken the heartwood only. (Lennart Hessel / www.lensman.se)
Great spotted woodpeckers are distributed throughout Europe and N Asia, and are usually resident year-round except in the colder parts of their range. Nesting trees chosen by this woodpecker almost invariably have soft heartwood and tough sapwood, often due to parasites or diseases that weaken the heartwood only. (Lennart Hessel / www.lensman.se)
Puffins shed the colorful outer parts of their bills after the breeding season, leaving a smaller and duller beak. Their short wings are adapted for swimming with a flying technique under water. In the air, they need to beat their wings rapidly (up to 400 times per minute) to stay airborne. (Samuele Parentella / www.samueleparentella.it)
Puffins shed the colorful outer parts of their bills after the breeding season, leaving a smaller and duller beak. Their short wings are adapted for swimming with a flying technique under water. In the air, they need to beat their wings rapidly (up to 400 times per minute) to stay airborne. (Samuele Parentella / www.samueleparentella.it)
Verditer flycatchers are found in the Indian subcontinent (especially in the Lower Himalayas). They are interesting among flycatchers as they forage above the canopy and perch on electric wires or exposed tree top branches. (Debojit Deb)
Verditer flycatchers are found in the Indian subcontinent (especially in the Lower Himalayas). They are interesting among flycatchers as they forage above the canopy and perch on electric wires or exposed tree top branches. (Debojit Deb)
Spotted eagle-owls are common in southern African cities where they hunt rats and mice at night between buildings and in open grasslands. They are targeted by the pet trade, as they make amicable pets. (Denis Smit)
Spotted eagle-owls are common in southern African cities where they hunt rats and mice at night between buildings and in open grasslands. They are targeted by the pet trade, as they make amicable pets. (Denis Smit)
Malachite kingfishers are small river specialists that dart just above the surface from low perches to catch fish, tadpoles, frogs and insects on the water's surface. They are found throughout SubSaharan Africa. (Chris Krog)
Malachite kingfishers are small river specialists that dart just above the surface from low perches to catch fish, tadpoles, frogs and insects on the water’s surface. They are found throughout SubSaharan Africa. (Chris Krog)
Ivory gulls breed in the high Arctic and has a circumpolar distribution through Greenland, northernmost N America, and Eurasia. Photographed here in the Arctic Circle in a snow storm... (Laura Dyer / www.lauradyerphotography.com)
Ivory gulls breed in the high Arctic and has a circumpolar distribution through Greenland, northernmost N America, and Eurasia. Photographed here in the Arctic Circle in a snow storm… (Laura Dyer / www.lauradyerphotography.com)

 

logo-vectorPlease join the Wild Bird Trust page on Facebook or follow us on Twitter to receive all wild bird photo updates and news from our research and conservation projects in the field. Submit your own photos and become part of this important public awareness campaign to bring the magic of wild birds to the world. Prepare to be blown away every week… The Wild Bird Trust was founded in South Africa in August 2009 with the primary objective of keeping birds safe in the wild. The trust aims to encourage the use of flagship endangered bird species as “ecosystem ambassadors” in their indigenous habitat. The trust focusses on linking ordinary people with conservation action in the field through innovative marketing campaigns and brand development. Saving Africa’s birds is going to take a determined effort from all of us.

See last week “Top 25 Wild Bird Photographs of the Week #39″: 

Comments

  1. Mary
    May 6, 1:59 pm

    The blue heron does not fly like that. Their legs stick out behind them in flight. This has been photo shopped and NG has been taken for a fake picture.
    You cannot see this?

  2. David
    May 6, 2:48 am

    It’s difficult to really tell if the photos of the eagle and heron where Photoshoped for the reasons Robert and Melanie mentioned; for starters, the angle and trajectory of the heron’s flight could hide the legs as I myself have witnessed and photographed. In this case, the heron appears to be swooping up therefore hiding the legs at the angle of flight. If you look at 99% of heron photos, they are usually taken sideways exposing the legs completely and also when photographed up, they are flying in a relaxed state not a state of stress as in this case. In the case of the wingspan, here again this is not correct as their wingspan are very similar, Great Blue Heron’s have a wingspan of 66–79 inches and the Bald Eagles a wingspan of 69-89 inches so they are close in size. Also the subject closest to the camera, in this case the Heron, will appear larger. Anyway, it’s sad that today all images are questioned to their validity and I suppose is our fault but I believe that this photo is true base on my experience.

  3. Paul Paul
    Wisconsin
    May 5, 11:24 pm

    Where are the heron’s feet? Should be extended behind him. Also, when the Eagle gets that close, the Heron flips over, so he can defend himself with his feet (of which he does not have).

  4. Elaine Meigs
    May 3, 2:37 pm

    Agree with Barb and Robert. The heron and eagle have to be photoshopped for the reasons mentioned, plus the fact that they have very different wingspans, and here they look identical. Would like to be able to trust photos posted by National Geographic…sigh.

  5. Barb
    British Columbia, Canada
    May 2, 12:27 pm

    Where are the heron’s legs?! This looks photoshopped.

  6. Ivete santos
    Brasil
    May 1, 6:43 pm

    ISSO É DEUS, MOSTRANDO UM POUQUINHO DE QUE ELE É CAPAZ!!!!!!
    Excepcional !!!!!

  7. Ofelia A. Santos
    Philippines
    April 29, 5:54 pm

    The flight of the Bald Eagle and the Great Blue Heron … depicts our own flights … either we fly to our purpose or fly way from something we fear. Yet, the beauty remains as we continue to fly with grace, knowing that Life will continue as it should and could. Let us treasure all the birds in freedom!

  8. Robert
    February 25, 1:33 pm

    Heron and eagle is photoshopped, he forgot the heron’s legs which are extended back in flight.

  9. subhadeep bhunia
    west bengal, india
    February 10, 11:35 pm

    no speech about that.. just awesome

  10. shyamlj
    amravati INDIA
    May 31, 2013, 11:46 am

    I FACCINATED OF BIRDS PHOTOGRAPHER

  11. Gerd
    Spitze
    April 8, 2013, 1:14 pm

    Super tolle Fotos

  12. Gerd
    April 8, 2013, 1:09 pm

    Echt tolle Fotos

  13. Sekar Ps
    Erode, Tamil Nadu, India.
    April 3, 2013, 10:29 pm

    great captures!

  14. Sekar Ps
    Erode, Tamil Nadu, India.
    April 3, 2013, 10:28 pm

    Birds are the indicators of good nature. Well done.

  15. David Coates
    Cheshire
    March 31, 2013, 2:26 am

    Fantastic shots we have many varieties of birds here in the uk and i’m inspired by these plcs to do better when i’m out with my camera thanks to you all for sharing your work.

  16. mau
    Zambales, Philippines
    March 28, 2013, 8:52 pm

    they are all reflections of beauty and awe, give thanks with a grateful heart..

  17. sukhvir singh
    delhi
    March 28, 2013, 7:26 am

    nice photo

  18. Pablo Garza
    MEXICO CITY
    March 28, 2013, 5:17 am

    Totally awesome! great work in all of them. Thanks

  19. kings
    puduvai
    March 26, 2013, 10:16 pm

    All pictures very nice and very exlent

  20. Samir Desani
    Bhavnagar, India.
    March 26, 2013, 12:30 am

    Awesome

  21. georg baun
    March 25, 2013, 6:28 pm

    All super… :)

  22. vicky
    March 25, 2013, 3:58 pm

    THANKYOU!! Each one ! ..a sight to behold!! and then as you gaze at their beauty you think of the struggles they all have, to survive in this world of climate change , loss of habitat , and in so many instances disregard by humans. Thank you ALL for the work you do, and the awareness you bring to us. May there be change for the better!

  23. Raj Sarkar
    West Bengal , India
    March 25, 2013, 11:12 am

    Gr888…