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Amazing Photo of Wild Duck Cluster

The Wild Duck Cluster takes flight, to stargazers’ delight.

Missing Isotopes: What’s Happening in the World’s Highest Glaciers?

On the roof of the world in Tibet, Natalie Kehrwald and her colleagues have made a surprising discovery about climate and glaciers.

Fisherman Rescues Drowning Eagle: Explaining Viral Video

Get the story behind how a young eagle ended up struggling in the water—and how it’s faring now.

Growing the Next Generation of Botanical Pioneers

By Mike Maunder, Interim Director, The Kampong, National Tropical Botanical Garden Two weeks ago I was in South Sudan working with East African and South Sudanese colleagues preparing a plant conservation project for the Imatong Mountains. Rivers spill out of these beautiful mountain forests providing water to huge areas of South Sudan.  Yet the forests that…

Video Time Lapse of 1,200 Miles in the Tracks of a Wolf

Before watching this video, take a moment to think about Wolf OR-7′s 2011 dispersal across Oregon and Northern California. In your mind, what do you see? Do you think of a map, maybe with lines or data on it?

Busting Indonesia’s Manta Gill Trade

This article is brought to you by the International League of Conservation Photographers (iLCP). Read our other articles on the National Geographic News Watch blog featuring the work of our iLCP Fellow Photographers all around the world. Text and photos by iLCP Fellow Paul Hilton. Writing this from a hotel room in Indonesia’s second-largest city, Surabaya, I realize…

6 Sky Events This Week: Cosmic Swan and Eagle Take Flight

A treasure trove of starry sights fill the night skies this week.

September 28, 2014: Meeting A Mountain Legend, Skiing First-Descents in Greenland and More

This week on National Geographic Weekend radio, join host Boyd Matson and his guests as they break human endurance records climbing mountains, win the Google Science Fair, eat like our ancestors, ski first descents in Greenland, vaccinate our children, chase endangered hogs in Uganda, and record a dying language.

Exciting Discoveries Continue on Mindanao

Ronald Clouse is back from the Philippines with harvestmen specimens—otherwise known as daddy-long-legs. Even after returning home, however, new discoveries and conservation initiatives continue in the Philippines among new, native enthusiasts.

How Burmese Elephants Helped Defeat the Japanese in World War II

James Howard “Billy” Williams, the son of a mining engineer from Cornwall, in England, seems to have stepped straight out of the pages of The Jungle Book, by Rudyard Kipling. Employed as a forest manager with a British teak company in colonial Burma, he was captivated by the strength, the intelligence, and even the sense…

Foodie Bees: Insects Head Downtown for Dinner

Foodies aren’t the only ones these days swarming cities in search of the best eats: Bees also prefer to eat in cities, new research shows.

Flooding the Landscape: The Site C Dam on B.C.’s Peace River

This article is brought to you by the International League of Conservation Photographers (iLCP). Read our other articles on the National Geographic News Watch blog featuring the work of our iLCP Fellow Photographers all around the world. Text and Photos by iLCP Fellow Garth Lenz. As the small Piper Super Cub climbs, this beautiful valley spreads out below…

Astronomers Clue in to Why Binary Stars Are So Bountiful

Everyone needs some alone time—even stars. Astronomers now think they have an explanation as to why so many stars are single or double stars. While most stars are born in clustered stellar nurseries, the great majority we see across the cosmos spend their lives as loners or double stars.  A new study published this week in…

5 Surprising Facts About Squirrels (Hint: They Make Jerky)

As squirrels in the Northern Hemisphere hoard food for winter, we take a look at the industrious and diverse rodents, which can range from a half an ounce to 20 pounds.

As Expedition Ends, Scientists Can Crack Like Deep-Sea Rocks

The data collected on this trip about subduction zone origins will likely generate new models, and show that our planet is more complicated than previously thought. It’s challenging to sustain the energy levels exuded at the beginning, since writing reports, analyses, and daily seminars eventually look like a conveyor belt of never-ending goods. Turns out we all need variety in our day-to-day living; even scientists who love the idea of doing JUST research.