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So You Lost Your Drone Again?

This post is the latest in the Drones and Small Unmanned Aerial Systems Special Series,  which profiles interesting information, thoughts and research into using  drones, UAVs or remotely piloted vehicles for journalism and photography, that Kike learns about during his travels.  One of the most shocking experiences for a pilot of Small Unmanned Vehicles is to face a fly-away. Whatever the…

Slow Loris Outreach Week Is Here (Didn’t You Know?)

One of the world’s most endangered primates is also one of its cutest. Learn about the slow loris and how National Geographic grantee Anna Nekaris is working to protect them in the wild.

Political and Weather Climates are Changing, But at What Speed?

The weather in Washington, D.C. finally turned hot in September, just in time for Congress to resume. We enjoyed an unusually moderate summer this year, with many days topping out in the high seventies or low eighties. Plenty of sun. San Diego weather, you might say. Before September, we were missing about two full weeks…

“Extinct” Snail Found Alive—But for How Long?

“So I was wrong,” scientist says about extinction—but cautions the purple-and-pink mollusk is still perilously close to dying out.

With 38% of Global Shale Gas Located in Regions of Water Stress, More Oversight of Fracking is Urgently Needed

As more data emerge, shale gas increasingly appears to be in the cross-hairs of the water-energy nexus, and far too little is being done to defuse impending conflicts. While hydraulic fracturing (or “fracking”), the process used to unleash natural gas from shale deposits, has raised serious concerns about groundwater contamination, less attention has been given…

Breadfruit, the Tree of Life for a Hungry Planet

By Diane Ragone, Director of the Breadfruit Institute, National Tropical Botanical Garden

I’ve been interested in breadfruit since I began my graduate work in 1983. I was mainly interested in traditional fruit trees in the Pacific Islands. Then, I wrote a term paper on breadfruit, and I became really interested in its importance to plant diversity and food security.

Palau Expedition: The Good Side of Bad Weather

Expedition member Manu San Felix captures a dynamic photo that illustrates the chaotic beauty of the ocean world.

Lewis Pugh Swims the Seven Seas

Lewis Pugh was recovering at home in South Africa when I spoke with him by phone. Just four days earlier he had finished a monumental swimming challenge, completing seven long-distance swims in under a month. He quietly said “It was much harder than I thought”, which was a surprising admission from this world-renowned endurance swimmer.…

New Species for the IUCN Red List

The biodiversity of life on Earth is disappearing faster than at any time in human history. Among the many people sounding the alarm of our disappearing natural history the IUCN Red List is the instrument that is used to measure biodiversity loss and the species that are most at risk of extinction. People like Elizabeth…

Wyland Paints Mural With Hōkūleʻa Voyagers in American Samoa

Robert Wyland, Polynesian Voyaging Society crewmember and renowned marine artist, was inspired to paint a mural at the Ocean Center in Pago Pago, American Samoa.

7 Bug and Spider Myths Squashed

How many spiders do we really eat in a year? Can cockroaches survive nuclear winter? What’s the difference between venomous and poisonous?

Maasai Steppe Warrior for Wildlife Elvis Kisimir Speaks Up for Lions

“In a few years to come, the world will only see the rare lion spoor on the sandy soil. If the wind blows, then even those spoor will go.” One extraordinary Maasai warrior shares his message for the world about the future of big cats. Elvis Kisimir experiences the full extent of familial responsibility while…

U.N. Report: Carbon Dioxide Levels at Record Highs

The concentration and the rate of carbon dioxide (CO2) levels in the atmosphere are spiking, according to new analysis from the World Meteorological Organization (WMO). Scientists believe the record levels are not only the result of emissions but also of plants and oceans’ inability to absorb the excess amounts of CO2. “We know without any doubt that our climate…

There’s Something in the Water

Although smaller than five millimeters in size, microplastic particles contaminating our oceans and rivers likely pose a massive environmental and human health risk.

Solar Storm Heading for Earth May Spark Auroras This Weekend

A solar outburst promises weekend northern lights.