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Bouncing Back: Nepal’s Tigers Survive Civil Turmoil

By Joseph Allchin

Dhaka, Bangladesh–For years the Himalayan nation of Nepal lacked a functional government. Years of war and subsequent reorientation of the state, left vulnerable the nation’s rich fauna and in particular its tigers to the rampant poaching that has decimated wildlife populations across Asia. While Nepal’s politicians bickered, fears rose for its iconic tiger, one of its most majestic animals. But now Nepal’s big cat may be on the rebound.

MAVEN Arrives in Martian Orbit

MAVEN and Mars, two great things that now go together.

TEDMED: 50 ideas that might just change the face of health around the world

Hundreds of people surged up the steps of the Kennedy Center in Washington DC this month sporting the iconic oversized badges that only meant one thing – time for TEDMED. This famous – and exclusive – conference from the people behind TED Talks is attended by health innovators from all over the world. The aim…

You Cannot Save the Climate Without Trees

The People’s Climate March that trumpeted its way through the streets of Manhattan yesterday was led by communities on the front lines of climate change—and Indigenous Peoples were at the forefront of this group.  The tropical forests where they live are not only getting hammered by changing weather patterns, drug traffickers, invasive pests, and massive…

A Winter of Mouse Eradications

This winter has seen New Zealand teams busy with mouse eradications across the country. In the Hauraki Gulf the University of Auckland and Auckland Council teamed up to eradicate introduced house mice (Mus musculus) from two neighbouring small islands; Moturekareka and Motuketekete, with the last bait being applied last weekend. At around 25 hectares each…

Castles in the Air: Experiences and Journeys in Unknown Bhutan

One hundred years ago, in 1914, National Geographic published its first article about the Himalayan kingdom of Bhutan: a compelling account of surveys of the region by John Claude White, a British Empire administrator and explorer. Profusely illustrated with his own photographs, White’s report lifted the veil on a mysterious land hidden in the world’s highest mountains.

In Search of Svalbard Sea Monsters

Here be dragons! On the remote island of Spitsbergen, deep inside the Arctic circle, the remains of some of the most fearsome sea monsters to have prowled the oceans have been entombed in rock for more than 150,000,000 years. National Geographic Emerging Explorer Jørn Harald Hurum and his team have been excavating the fossils for many…

Ask Your Weird Animal Questions: Why Do Lobsters Turn Red When Cooked?

Are wood roaches different than cockroaches? Do killer whales usually attack in groups? See this week’s Ask Your Weird Animal Questions.

Watch the Google Science Fair Awards Monday

How do you choose from the best of the best? This is the dilemma the judges will face as they choose the 2014 Google Science Fair winner! You can have a seat at the table and tune in to the awards ceremony live on Monday, September 22 at 7pm PST.

Crashing Into Ice: The Impact of Climate Change, On My Head

Ruby, Françoise, and I are barefoot and wearing t-shirts as we conduct sea bird surveys from the prow of the M/V Cape Race. Between shifts we close our eyes, the sun warms our faces and it feels downright tropical. Opening our eyes again, we are reminded of where we are. Looming in the distance are massive, glassy ice bergs, which we will soon be swimming by.

Inserting Captive-Bred Tigers Into the Wild: Will it Work?

By Joseph Allchin

Dhaka, Bangladesh–The South China tiger has not been seen in the wild since the 1960s. Although Chinese delegates at a global tiger conference in Dhaka, Bangladesh this week are reluctant to admit it is extinct in the wild, it might as well be, because no confirmed sightings have been made since the 1970s. There were under 60 of the subspecies left in zoos worldwide in 2002.

However there is now hope that captive tigers can be trained to be reintroduced and function in the wild for the first time in decades.

Extinction or Survival: Botanic Gardens as Agents of Change

  By Chipper Wichman, Director and CEO of the National Tropical Botanical Garden With climate change flexing its muscles and demographers from several universities and the United Nations projecting global population growth climbing towards 11 billion through the end of the 21st century, the conservation of our planet’s biodiversity has never been more important. At…

Lonesome George Unveiled in New York City

Lonesome George, the famous Galápagos Island tortoise that was the last of his kind when he died in 2012, is due to get some company.

7 More Bug Myths Squashed: Giant Killer Insects, Flesh-Eating Beetles

Can roaches really get stuck in your ear? Will scarab beetles really crawl into your body and eat you alive? We take on seven more bug myths suggested by our readers.

Short Film Showcase: Encounter Another Era in Havana’s Vibrant Streets

Step back in time with a present-day snapshot of Cuba’s lively coastal capital, filled with beautifully weathered buildings, colorful classic cars, and a rich culture. Filmmaker Ezaram Vambe captures the city’s atmosphere and its inhabitants in this visually stunning travelogue dedicated to the people of Havana. We spoke to Ezaram about his trip. What inspired you to make a film about Havana?…