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Island Conservation in the Mozambique Channel

The April 2014 issue of National Geographic magazine has a fantastic photo-essay on two French islands of the Mozambique Channel: Europa and Bassas da India. The article describes the pristine marine environments around the islands along with some amazing dive shots. I was privileged enough to work on Europa Island throughout 2008, not on the…

Study Deals Blow for Biofuels as EPA Lowers 2013 Mandate

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) on Tuesday retroactively lowered the quantity of cellulosic biofuel required for blending in traditional fuels for 2013. In January the EPA agreed to reconsider the mandate “due to the reduced estimate of anticipated cellulosic biofuel production in 2013 that was announced shortly after EPA signed its final rule by one of two companies…

Tamping Down on Water Use in Drought Stricken California

By Meg Wilcox, Senior Manger, Communications, Ceres The Dawn Creek subdivision in Lancaster, 60 miles north of Los Angeles, looks like any other neighborhood scattered across California’s Antelope Valley. Its neatly arrayed modern homes blend into the arid landscape, sporting hues the colors of the desert—burnt umber, sienna and ecru. But Dawn Creek contains a…

Happy DNA Day: Genetic Results From New York City Students Reveal Microcosm of the World

Fifty-one years ago James Watson, Francis Crick, Maurice Wilkins, and Rosalind Franklin published a landmark paper on the structure of DNA. Since then, April 25 has been recognized as DNA Day, a day for celebrating all that we know about genetics, including what DNA tells us about our ancient past. Today, Genographic Project scientists are…

Tracking the World’s Largest Salmon With Sonar

  By Pete Rand, Wild Salmon Center Conservation Biologist, Fulbright Fellow and NGS Grantee Onishibetsu, Japan – I’ve learned to be patient.  A skill honed as an obsessed fly fisherman years ago. Lately, though, I don’t use a rod and reel to stalk fish.  The challenge of “catching” them with sonar I find much more gratifying.…

Afghanistan on the Bounce: Reflections on Life on Deployment

As a documentation/production specialist in Afghanistan, photographer Robert L. Cunningham accompanied soldiers of 40 different units on 132 combat missions, following them during their typical on-base routines as well as into hazardous situations. In Afghanistan: On the Bounce (Insight Editions), a book he produced with writer Steve Hartov, he examines the service members’ weapons, uniforms, vehicles, and gear, along with reflections on duty, insights and life on deployment.

NKAF Summer Space Camp in Vermont: Adventures in Science for Teenagers

In early August 2013, Northern Skies Observatory (NSO) was abuzz with activity during the Northeast Kingdom Astronomy Foundation’s (NKAF) successful summer Space Camp. Attendance was limited to 10 high school and middle school students, and these slots filled quickly. Students ranged in age from 12 to 17, and, while most were from Vermont, they hosted…

Marine Mammals Along California Coast Rescued in Record Numbers

As a leader in rescue and rehabilitation work, Shedd Aquarium has established partnerships with rescue organizations all over the country to respond to animals in need. This week, we are sharing a guest blog post from our partner – The Marine Mammal Center, the world’s largest rescue and rehabilitation hospital for sick, injured and orphaned…

Tracking the Lives of Nonstop Swimmers

How do you study an animal that never stops swimming? Find out how the Pristine Seas team is using technology to go along for the ride.

What’s Making Duck Sounds in the Ocean? Mystery Solved

It may sound quacky, but mysterious duck-like sounds in the oceans are made by whales, a new study says.

Fish and Cattle Fans Cooperate in Klamath Basin

As a historic water-sharing agreement is signed, a look back to the roots of finding common ground from the sky in the Klamath River Basin.

Q&A: What Can Dog Brains Tell Us About Humans?

Canine researcher Ádám Miklósi of the Family Dog Project gets us into the head of the family pooch—and how that could help us learn about our own brains.

Hagfish Slime Could Be Eco-Friendly Fabric

A new study on the defensive goo raises new mysteries and suggests it could be an eco-friendly alternative to nylon.

Saving Goat Islands, Jamaica

Text and photos by Robin Moore, Fellow at the International League of Conservation Photographers Guardian of the Reptiles “You’ve got to respect another life, so that the other life can respect yours,” says Booms, whose real name is Mr. Kenroy Williams, a young Jamaican who has devoted the past seven years of his life to protecting…

The ABCs of Ecosystem-Based Fisheries Management—Part II

Forage Fish: The Oceans’ Little Heroes Most Americans don’t think about fisheries policy when eating fish. But in fact, the supply of popular species such as cod, tuna, and salmon depends very much on how we manage them in the sea. If anglers, chefs, and diners want to continue catching, cooking, and eating fish, we…