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7 More Bug Myths Squashed: Giant Killer Insects, Flesh-Eating Beetles

Can roaches really get stuck in your ear? Will scarab beetles really crawl into your body and eat you alive? We take on seven more bug myths suggested by our readers.

Short Film Showcase: Encounter Another Era in Havana’s Vibrant Streets

Step back in time with a present-day snapshot of Cuba’s lively coastal capital, filled with beautifully weathered buildings, colorful classic cars, and a rich culture. Filmmaker Ezaram Vambe captures the city’s atmosphere and its inhabitants in this visually stunning travelogue dedicated to the people of Havana. We spoke to Ezaram about his trip. What inspired you to make a film about Havana?…

Bobcats Prowl Among Us: Haunt Birdfeeders, Brooks, Boulevards

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It’s on the prowl from three hours before sunset until midnight, and again before dawn ‘til three hours after sunrise.  Each night, it moves two to seven miles, mostly on the same route. Along the way it visits, like the humans in whose shadow it lives, known locales.  But its stomping grounds are a hollow…

The Coral Triangle: Amazon of the Oceans

This article is brought to you by the International League of Conservation Photographers (iLCP). Read our other articles on the National Geographic News Watch blog featuring the work of our iLCP Fellow Photographers all around the world. Text and photos by iLCP Fellow James Morgan. I’ve been fortunate to see most of the world’s oceans the past couple…

The Cost of Fixing Climate Change

Reducing greenhouse gas emissions could boost the economy rather than slow it, according to a new study by the Global Commission on the Economy and Climate. Better Growth, Better Climate: The New Climate Economy Report finds that roughly $90 trillion will be spent in the next 15 years on new infrastructure around the world. Adopting rules that redirect that…

Why Some Males Evolved to Be Small and Sneaky

Bigger males may get a lot of attention, but sometimes being smaller and having a different strategy is more successful when it comes to mating.

When I Grow Up: A Day With Our Next-Generation Monks

Lost in the adventures of the mountainous terrain in Laos, we are guided by an unexpected group of new friends with a unique, traditional upbringing.

Top 25 Wild Bird Photographs of the Week #72

Firethroats, kingfishers, openbills, nightjars, stilts, leafbirds, roadrunners, mangos, laughthrushes, and rubythroats are featured in this 72nd edition of the “Top 25 Wild Bird Photographs of the Week”! With almost 600,000 followers on the Wild Bird Trust Facebook page, the Wild Bird Revolution is accelerating towards our goal of 1 million Wild Bird Enthusiasts by the end…

Stayin’ Alive: Baby Mantis Shrimp Use Light to Stay Invisible

Young mantis shrimp that depend on transparent bodies to avoid predators, use reflectors in their eyes to make them invisible, according to a new study.

Milky Way Mysteries Mapped

  Ever look up and wonder how many stars are out there in the night sky, and where did all these stars come from? Now astronomers have actually counted every single twinkling star visible from the night skies of Earth—and the number is astounding. Using the giant 8.2-foot (2.5-meter) glass eye of the Isaac Newton…

Following Nemo: Clownfish Make Epic Ocean Journeys

Turns out finding Nemo could take a while—a new study reveals for the first time that baby clownfish travel up to 250 miles in search of a new reef.

Bangladesh Vows to Protect Wild Tigers in Spite of Industrialization

By Joseph Allchin

Dakha, Bangladesh–Bangladesh’s prime minister, Sheikh Hasina, opened a major international conference on tiger conservation in the country’s capital, Dhaka, on Sunday. With delegates from all 13 tiger range countries in attendance, Hasina stated that her “government will do everything for conservation of the tigers,” lamenting “indiscriminate industrialization,” as a chief threat to habitats.

Bangladesh’s government is, however, involved in several industrial projects controversially located very close to the country’s sole remaining tiger habitat, the largest contiguous mangroves in the world, the Sundarbans.

Protecting Antarctic Marine Ecosystems: From Anemones to Whales

Over the past few years, I’ve written a lot about efforts to create marine protected areas (MPAs) in the Southern Ocean. For someone like me, who works on these issues and studies the Antarctic environment, the justification for MPAs is obvious. Antarctic ecosystems are bursting with incredible marine life, much of which we have yet…

Transforming Indonesia’s Manta Fisheries

This article is brought to you by the International League of Conservation Photographers (iLCP). Read our other articles on the National Geographic News Watch blog featuring the work of our iLCP Fellow Photographers all around the world. Text and photos by iLCP Fellow Shawn Heinrichs Transforming Indonesia’s Manta Fisheries: The path to creating an effective Manta Sanctuary Indonesia announced…

Pulling Secrets from Deep-sea, Drillbit-Eating Rocks

Hidden seafloor can harbor tales of volcanic explosions. But getting it to cough up some stories can lead to a butchered drill bit.