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Ocean Acidification from Domestic to International

  Since the industrial revolution began, we have released 2 trillion tons of carbon dioxide (CO2) into the atmosphere, and about one-third of it went into the ocean. We initially thought that the ocean taking up CO2 was a good thing – because it took it out of the atmosphere. Unfortunately, we were wrong.  There…

An Expedition for Everyone: Open Data in the Okavango

By their nature, expeditions are dangerous. Wild animals, treacherous terrain, painful labor—a lot is risked in sending groups of people into the extreme. So why do we do it? Historically, the answer has been one of two things: for money, or for measurement. In the first case, expeditions might have brought back tonnes of ivory,…

The Future of the Past in Palau

Enric Sala and team are back in the big blue on their latest expedition to explore and document the world’s most pristine seas. This time, the destination is the Micronesian island group of Palau.

The MPA Wave

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In 2004, Australia created the first large-scale marine protected area (MPA) in the world. Its Great Barrier Reef Marine Park had been a world heritage site since 1981, but ten years ago the government of Australia did the unthinkable – they banned all fishing, both recreational and commercial, from 33% of the park. In one…

Face-to-Face Conservation

“The phone calls always seem to be on a Sunday and 1000 kilometres (600 miles) away from here” Florian Weise tells me. We’re standing next to a huge drum of diesel — “this is where the NGS Big Cats Initiative money went” he explains, filling up his pick-up for the long journey. Florian’s insights into…

Teen Pharmacist: An Unregulated Distribution of Drugs

After several injuries from a motorcycle accident, Sadia Ali ventures to a remote pharmacy to get medication. Her experience is an outstanding illustration of the pharmaceutical conditions in Laos.

Whale Encounters in Arctic Svalbard

We did not see the rare bowhead whale during our week-long cruise through Svalbard early in the summer of 2014, but our ship, National Geographic Explorer, had some dramatic encounters with humpbacks, and there were also excellent sightings of fin whales and belugas.

Northern California Region 2-day UAV Symposium in Nevada

This post is the latest in the Drones and Small Unmanned Aerial Systems Special Series. The ASPRS Northern California Region is hosting a 2-day symposium on unmanned aircraft systems (UAS) in Reno (Nevada) on October 21-22, 2014. The purpose of the event is to assemble academia, UAS developers, survey and mapping companies and government agencies with interests…

1833 Meteor Storm Started Citizen Science

Crowdsourcing astronomy discoveries goes back a ways, to 1833, and a truly remarkable meteor shower.

Tourism Not Tuna

There is a new wave of conservation in the Pacific.   Fed up with overfishing and other non-sustainable practices like shark finning, small island nations are returning to more traditional ways.  They are beginning to scale back industrial fishing in their waters, to protect their fish stocks from illegal fishing, and to create sustainable tourism destinations…

Five New “Flying Monkeys” Identified in Amazon

Five species of acrobatic monkey that have long flown under the scientific radar have been named in South America, a new study says.

Wilderness: As it Was in the Beginning

This article is brought to you by the International League of Conservation Photographers (iLCP). Read our other articles on the National Geographic News Watch blog featuring the work of our iLCP Fellow Photographers all around the world. Text and Photography by iLCP Fellow Krista Schlyer September 3rd, 2014, marks the 50th anniversary of The Wilderness Act–Americans will be…

Whether in Iceland or on Mars, Follow the Water

Bethany Ehlmann is touring with students in Iceland to learn more about the dynamic geological processes that mold and carve our planet in order to gain insight on other planets, particularly Mars. Crystals and underground rivers speak of the cycle of fire and ice.

The Genographic Project unveils the ancient ancestry of New Zealand, the world’s last settled islands

The Genographic Project results are in from 100 Kiwis (or New Zealanders). The results were revealed to an excited crowd of participants, which included New Zealand’s own Governor General Sir Jerry Mateparae. Background Earlier this year, a team from National Geographic’s Genographic Project was invited by the Allan Wilson Centre to North Island, New Zealand to shed…

My Fihavanana Malagasy: At Home on the Eighth Continent

Cara Brook is a disease ecologist from the Andrew Dobson Lab at Princeton, studying diseases that can leap from bats to humans. In the course of her work, she has earned a Malagasy family, which sparks her curiosity for the origins of humanity on Madagascar.