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Watch Death Valley’s Rocks Walk Before Your Eyes

Scientist believe they’ve solved the mystery of Death Valley’s “walking” rocks.

Wolves Vulnerable to Contagious Yawning

Contagious yawning in wolves give researchers a glimpse at the roots of empathy.

Bardarbunga: Jokulhaups Alert!

In Iceland, Bethany Ehlmann is touring with students to learn more about the dynamic geological processes that mold and carve our planet in order to learn about other planets, particularly Mars. As the recent earthquakes around Bardarbunga intensify and eruption appears imminent, warnings of Jokulhaups ring from the dells.

A Year Ago Today: Spring in South Africa

National Geographic Young Explorer Evan Eifler is working to preserve the endangered ecosystems of South Africa, most notably the renosterveld. Check out the amazing images he has captured of endangered and unique flowers.

Q&A: Landmark Report Reveals Crucial Links in the Illegal Ivory Trade

While there are effectively unlimited numbers of poachers and consumers fueling the lucrative illegal ivory market, a new report suggests that nearly all the ivory shuttled from Africa to Asia—the biggest market—is confined to as few as 200 shipping containers a year.

Washington, D.C.’s Snowy Owl Found Dead in Minnesota

A snowy owl that ventured out of the Arctic and into Washington D.C. this past winter dies in Minnesota.

August 24, 2014: How to Survive a Deadly Avalanche, Remembering Fallen War Reporters in Song and More

This week on National Geographic Weekend, join host Boyd Matson and his guests as they survive an avalanche while skiing in Washington, save the environment while winning the Stanley Cup, uncover the tombs of powerful women in the Andes, pay tribute to a pair of fallen war correspondents, sleep on a stranger’s couch, herd reindeer in the Russian arctic, and hold the jaws of crocodiles while we test just how hard they can bite.

4 Videos: Threatened Birds Face Polar Bears, Poop-Sniffing Reporters

The ultimate “canaries in the coal mine,” these threatened birds are giving researchers clues to the kind of world we could lose if climate change ranges unchecked. Watch as these feathered dynamos strut, dance, and sway.

Artist Anne Neely Evokes the Mystery and Magic of Water

Motivated by concern over growing threats to the world of water, Boston-area artist Anne Neely undertook a decade-long search to understand and interpret what is happening to rivers, lakes, oceans, glaciers and aquifers. “I approach painting by asking questions, just as a scientist does,” Neely writes in Water Stories, the companion book to the exhibit…

#Okavango14: Out There …

Poling 10,000 years back in time.

What’s a Fishing Spider? Behind the Arachnid Trending on Facebook

Freshwater Species of the Week: Fishing Spider

When the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources posted on its Facebook page that giant fishing spiders had been spotted around the state the news was shared more than 10,000 times. More than 2,000 comments were received, including from people posting their own images of the arachnids. Many posters expressed concern and abhorrence. But these are amazing animals with super powers, able to walk or sail with the wind on water, and they can haul up aquatic animals five times their weight.

Welcoming Hōkūle’a to American Samoa With Dr. Sylvia Earle

Daniel Lin and Dr. Sylvia Earle (National Geographic Explorer-in-Residence) team up to write about their experience of greeting Hōkūle’a and Hikianalia in American Samoa, and to reflect on the health of the ocean there.

The Highest Conservation Price

In all the money that is devoted to the conservation of the most charismatic species, there is one that has been lifted far above what I thought was the highest plateau of funds devoted to conservation. You might at first think of the Giant Panda. You, however, as I was, would be wrong; although millions…

5 Sky Events This Week: Cosmic Teapot Steams While Neptune Hits Prime Time

Moonless nights offer starry delights to stargazers this week.

See-Through Frogs With Green Bones Discovered in Peru

Researchers discover four new species of frog in the Peruvian Andes, three of which are see-through.