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Overfishing Remains Biggest Threat to Mediterranean, Study Confirms

Marine Ecologist Sala says a new study produced by a dozen researchers supports the projection that the Mediterranean is on a trajectory to become a sea dominated by small tropical species that no one likes to eat. “Fishes will not be abundant, and the native species that the Greeks and Romans started to fish commercially will be rare — and most fisheries and the jobs they support will collapse. But this could change if we stop all the irrational overfishing, including both legal and illegal fishing, and protect a large chunk of the Mediterranean. Without these radical changes, we’re just going to reduce the Mediterranean Sea to soup of microbes and jellyfish.”

Sharks, Rays, and (Finally) a Break in the Weather

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The rough seas finally calm and the weather improves for the Pristine Seas team in Mozambique, and they move north into more tropical waters and the exciting marine life that dwell there.

Two National Marine Sanctuaries May More Than Double in Size

Two national marine sanctuaries along the Northern California coast, renown for their rich animal life, may more than double in size if NOAA has its way.

Wilderness Cannot Be Restored Or Recreated. Only Destroyed.

“Wilderness cannot be restored or recreated. Only destroyed. We are just about to lose our last glimpses into prehistory that connect us to eternity and remember a time before modern man.” (Steve Boyes)

New Killer Sponges Found in the Deep Sea

The carnivorous invertebrates, discovered deep in the waters off California, use tiny hooks on their bodies to capture prey, a new study says.

Federal Appeals Court Upholds EPA Mercury Rule

A federal appeals court upheld the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s Mercury and Air Toxics Standards (MATS) requiring power plants install technology to cut emissions of mercury and other air pollutants. MATS was challenged by industry and several states that argued the EPA should have considered costs when determining whether it was “appropriate and necessary” to go forward with the standards. The…

The Penan Hunter-Gatherers of Sarawak

For the Penan of Sarawak’s rainforest, the raucous call of the white-crowned hornbill has long heralded dawn. Today, however, they are just as likely to be woken by the sound of chainsaws and falling trees. The tropical rainforest of Sarawak in Borneo, East Malaysia, is one of the most biologically rich forests on earth. It…

World’s First Female “Penis” Found, in Cave-Dwelling Bugs

Four new species of cave insects in Brazil have sex-reversed genitalia, a “completely astonishing” discovery, scientists say.

Basel to Host the Global Infrastructure Basel Summit and C40 Finance Network Meeting

Basel to host the Global Infrastructure Basel Summit and C40 Finance Network meeting APRIL 17, 2014 Email Twitter Facebook A guest post by Basel Mayor Guy Morin The City of Basel is looking forward to hosting the annual Global Infrastructure Basel Summit on 21-22 May 2014, and, as co-chair of the C40 Sustainable Infrastructure Finance Network, a dedicated…

Celebrating East African Pollinator Diversity!

Dear All Many greetings from the rainforest in Western Kenya! Am very pleased to share with you a recently complete book featuring and celebrating pollinator diversity in East Africa. You can download the book through link by clicking on the cover image below: Click on image above to go to the page where you can…

Top 25 Wild Bird Photographs of the Week #65

We cannot overstate the dedication of wild bird photographers around the world. Birds are extremely risk-averse and getting close is a time-earned skill born of years learning about their behaviour. Knowledge of your camera is essential with no room for error before this bird takes off. The wild bird photographs in this week’s collection are…

Here Today, Dugong Tomorrow!

The Pristine Seas dive team battles rough seas in this update from the expedition team in Mozambique.

Africa’s Illegal Charcoal Trade Engulfs Cheetah Habitat

In rural northern Tanzania, an African country famous for charismatic megafauna, including free-roaming cheetah and other big cats, impoverished and under-employed Swahili villagers struggle to survive. One way to earn money and make cooking fuel is to cut forests for wood that can be turned into charcoal. It’s an economic and environmental disaster, illegal because it is not sustainable for either wildlife or people. Meet the team that is looking for new ways to create livelihoods while teaching villagers the importance of protecting their natural wealth.

On the Trail of a Puma

After seeing pumas, their tracks, and their kills all week, we started catching them. Now five of San Guillermo’s pumas are wearing satellite collars that will show us what they’re killing, where, and how – giving us a new window into the workings of high Andean ecosystems.

Funny Video Takes on Plastic Pollution

As scientists debate how the world’s ocean might be picked free of plastic trash (hint: no one knows), a European nonprofit is taking on the problem with humor. The group Seas at Risk has just released the video above to remind people that what we do on land can have an impact on the ocean. Seas…