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Ask Your Weird Animal Questions: Why Do Lobsters Turn Red When Cooked?

Are wood roaches different than cockroaches? Do killer whales usually attack in groups? See this week’s Ask Your Weird Animal Questions.

Watch the Google Science Fair Awards Monday

How do you choose from the best of the best? This is the dilemma the judges will face as they choose the 2014 Google Science Fair winner! You can have a seat at the table and tune in to the awards ceremony live on Monday, September 22 at 7pm PST.

Crashing Into Ice: The Impact of Climate Change, On My Head

Ruby, Françoise, and I are barefoot and wearing t-shirts as we conduct sea bird surveys from the prow of the M/V Cape Race. Between shifts we close our eyes, the sun warms our faces and it feels downright tropical. Opening our eyes again, we are reminded of where we are. Looming in the distance are massive, glassy ice bergs, which we will soon be swimming by.

Inserting Captive-Bred Tigers Into the Wild: Will it Work?

By Joseph Allchin

Dhaka, Bangladesh–The South China tiger has not been seen in the wild since the 1960s. Although Chinese delegates at a global tiger conference in Dhaka, Bangladesh this week are reluctant to admit it is extinct in the wild, it might as well be, because no confirmed sightings have been made since the 1970s. There were under 60 of the subspecies left in zoos worldwide in 2002.

However there is now hope that captive tigers can be trained to be reintroduced and function in the wild for the first time in decades.

Extinction or Survival: Botanic Gardens as Agents of Change

  By Chipper Wichman, Director and CEO of the National Tropical Botanical Garden With climate change flexing its muscles and demographers from several universities and the United Nations projecting global population growth climbing towards 11 billion through the end of the 21st century, the conservation of our planet’s biodiversity has never been more important. At…

Lonesome George Unveiled in New York City

Lonesome George, the famous Galápagos Island tortoise that was the last of his kind when he died in 2012, is due to get some company.

7 More Bug Myths Squashed: Giant Killer Insects, Flesh-Eating Beetles

Can roaches really get stuck in your ear? Will scarab beetles really crawl into your body and eat you alive? We take on seven more bug myths suggested by our readers.

Short Film Showcase: Encounter Another Era in Havana’s Vibrant Streets

Step back in time with a present-day snapshot of Cuba’s lively coastal capital, filled with beautifully weathered buildings, colorful classic cars, and a rich culture. Filmmaker Ezaram Vambe captures the city’s atmosphere and its inhabitants in this visually stunning travelogue dedicated to the people of Havana. We spoke to Ezaram about his trip. What inspired you to make a film about Havana?…

Bobcats Prowl Among Us: Haunt Birdfeeders, Brooks, Boulevards

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It’s on the prowl from three hours before sunset until midnight, and again before dawn ‘til three hours after sunrise.  Each night, it moves two to seven miles, mostly on the same route. Along the way it visits, like the humans in whose shadow it lives, known locales.  But its stomping grounds are a hollow…

The Coral Triangle: Amazon of the Oceans

This article is brought to you by the International League of Conservation Photographers (iLCP). Read our other articles on the National Geographic News Watch blog featuring the work of our iLCP Fellow Photographers all around the world. Text and photos by iLCP Fellow James Morgan. I’ve been fortunate to see most of the world’s oceans the past couple…

The Cost of Fixing Climate Change

Reducing greenhouse gas emissions could boost the economy rather than slow it, according to a new study by the Global Commission on the Economy and Climate. Better Growth, Better Climate: The New Climate Economy Report finds that roughly $90 trillion will be spent in the next 15 years on new infrastructure around the world. Adopting rules that redirect that…

Why Some Males Evolved to Be Small and Sneaky

Bigger males may get a lot of attention, but sometimes being smaller and having a different strategy is more successful when it comes to mating.

When I Grow Up: A Day With Our Next-Generation Monks

Lost in the adventures of the mountainous terrain in Laos, we are guided by an unexpected group of new friends with a unique, traditional upbringing.

Top 25 Wild Bird Photographs of the Week #72

Firethroats, kingfishers, openbills, nightjars, stilts, leafbirds, roadrunners, mangos, laughthrushes, and rubythroats are featured in this 72nd edition of the “Top 25 Wild Bird Photographs of the Week”! With almost 600,000 followers on the Wild Bird Trust Facebook page, the Wild Bird Revolution is accelerating towards our goal of 1 million Wild Bird Enthusiasts by the end…

Stayin’ Alive: Baby Mantis Shrimp Use Light to Stay Invisible

Young mantis shrimp that depend on transparent bodies to avoid predators, use reflectors in their eyes to make them invisible, according to a new study.