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Antarctica 2014: Success at Lewis Bay

Join Ken Sims as he tackles perilous ice-encrusted volcanoes in the attempt to study their geological past in Antarctica.

October 19, 2014: Creating Electricity From Food Waste, Arresting Poachers and More

This week on National Geographic Weekend radio, join host Boyd Matson and his guests as they unearth the habits of the world’s largest-ever carnivore, digest kitchen waste to cook dinner, eat like a 500 year old king, stalk Chernobyl’s ruins, trace tree rings’ roots, write a novel about elephants with a plot twist, kayak to protest dams, prosecute poachers in Mozambique, and see the unseen as a large format film.

Puppy-Size Tarantula Found: Explaining World’s Biggest Spider

The world’s largest spider has crept back into the spotlight, thanks to a scientist who described harrowing arachnid encounters on his blog.

Why a Swordfish’s Sword Doesn’t Break

A swordfish’s “sword” is its most prominent feature, but scientists have only now discovered the unusual properties that keep the sword strong and ready to slash.

5 Sky Events This Week: Orion’s Meteors, Hidden Sun, and Zodiacal Light

October’s skies delight the eyes, for stargazers this week.

Through the Eyes of the Locals

Lost in the middle of a storm, Sadia and Andrew trek up the mountains to find a remote village in authentic Laos.

Stunning New Gorilla Documentary Brings DiCaprio and Netflix Together

Leonardo DiCaprio, the American film-star and outspoken environmentalist, has teamed up with online streaming giant Netflix to release one of this year’s most exciting documentaries: VIRUNGA.  Director Orlando von Einsiedel spent 11 months in the Democratic Republic of Congo in 2011 and 2012, filming the rangers in Virunga National Park who watch over the park’s rare…

Rapa Expedition: Off the Ship, Into the Jungle

With winds so strong the waterfalls were flowing upwards, the Pristine Seas crew lands at Rapa Iti and must hike the final miles to make it to the Island Council meeting for permission to begin the expedition.

CITES and confiscated elephant ivory and rhino horn – to destroy or not destroy?

Over the past 24 months we have seen a number of countries, including Belgium, Chad, China, Hong Kong SAR, China, Czech Republic, Gabon, France, Philippines, and the USA, destroy stockpiles of illegally traded elephant ivory and rhino horn that have been seized and confiscated. I have been invited by national CITES authorities to witness several…

Roads Benefit People But Can Have Massive Environmental Costs

Road-killed tapir in Peninsular Malaysia (photo © WWF-Malaysia/Lau Ching Fong) By William F. Laurance Located in the wrong places, roads can open a Pandora’s Box of problems, says William F. Laurance In a recent Opinion in National Geographic News (“Want to make a dent in world hunger? Build better roads”, 14 October 2014), U.S. Ambassador Kenneth…

Rapa Expedition: Polynesian Words of Inspiration

In anticipation of Pristine Seas crew’s arrival at Rapa Iti, team member Poema du Prel from Tahiti shares her reflections on the mission, and words of inspiration in two languages from her spiritual grandfather.

The Places We Love VII: Cleaning Up India

Thinking of visiting India? Then cheer for the Prime Minister’s new “Clean India” campaign. If successful, it will remove an ugly stain on the rich cultural tapestry of India.

Why Did Thousands of Venomous Spiders Swarm a House?

Thousands of brown recluse spiders that forced a family from their home may have been mostly males looking for mates, scientist says.

Comet’s Near Miss with Mars on Tap for Sunday

Heads up, a comet is coming to Mars.

Weird Animal Question of the Week: A Fungus That Looks Like Strawberries and Cream

This Weird Animal Question of the Week focuses on the odd world of fungi, which can resemble wiffleballs, bird’s nests, and strawberries and cream.