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Transforming Indonesia’s Manta Fisheries

This article is brought to you by the International League of Conservation Photographers (iLCP). Read our other articles on the National Geographic News Watch blog featuring the work of our iLCP Fellow Photographers all around the world. Text and photos by iLCP Fellow Shawn Heinrichs Transforming Indonesia’s Manta Fisheries: The path to creating an effective Manta Sanctuary Indonesia announced…

Pulling Secrets from Deep-sea, Drillbit-Eating Rocks

Hidden seafloor can harbor tales of volcanic explosions. But getting it to cough up some stories can lead to a butchered drill bit.

Crowdsourcing Subtitles for Endangered Languages

Viki, the crowdsourced subtitling website, teams with the Living Tongues Institute to give endangered languages new life and attractiveness for new generations.

Toxic “Toupee”: Explaining the Most Venomous Caterpillar in the U.S.

No warm and fuzzy here—a possible boom in a highly venomous but irresistibly touchable caterpillar is sending people in the eastern U.S. to the hospital.

Zambia’s Hunting “Bans”—Shedding Light on a Complicated History

By Katarzyna Nowak

On August 21, Zambia was reported to have “lifted its hunting ban,” announcing that a ban on hunting big cats—leopards and lions—would remain. One week later, an addendum was issued by the Zambian Wildlife Authority (ZAWA), clarifying that the hunting ban would remain in effect for elephants too.

However, confusion endures in the media, such as in a September 9 article on Mongabay: “Zambia ends trophy hunting ban, elephants fair game.”

Was there ever a hunting ban in Zambia, has Zambia resumed hunting, and will elephants be hunted?

Cities to Take Center Stage During Climate Week

Next week, environmental groups and business and government leaders from around the world will convene in New York City for Climate Week NYC, sponsored by C40 partners, the Climate Group and CDP. C40 cities represent more than 500 million people around the world, making us a significant voice demanding climate action of world’s leaders. Because of…

Geography in the News: Losing Daylight Savings Time

By Neal Lineback and Mandy Lineback Gritzner, Geography in the NewsTM No Longer Saving Time? Daylight saving time will be over for this year in most of the United States at 2 a.m. on November 2. With the exceptions of American Samoa, Arizona, Hawaii, Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands, the rest of the country…

September 14, 2014: Wiring an African Wilderness, Starting a Garbage-Fueled Country and More

This week on National Geographic Weekend radio, join host Boyd Matson and his guests as they discover a well-dressed Italian mummy, proclaim a nation devoted to garbage, find the perfect island, find new ways to survive cancer, explore the Okavango Delta for science, relate to a solitary blue whale, celebrate the Wilderness Act, and create a canine soup.

Rare Black-Footed Ferret Babies

Christin Jones joins in on a late-night black-footed ferret tour to ascertain their numbers. In the fight against extinction, every individual counts.

117 Million Lakes Found in Latest World Count

Using satellite photos and computerized mapping technologies, an international research team counted all of the lakes on Earth. They found about 117 million lakes, covering almost four percent of the world’s land surface, not counting the glaciers on Greenland and Antarctica, according to a new study. It is the first time the world’s lakes have been…

4 Sky Events This Week: Moon Points to Crab and Leo’s Heart

A Lion’s Heart and some starry graveyards come this way for skywatchers.

OPINION: Can Elephants Survive a Continued Ivory Trade Ban?

Daniel Stiles, a member of the IUCN/SSC African Elephant Specialist Group, discusses whether there should be a legal trade in elephant ivory, and proposes elements that could be included in a legal trade. The outcome, he believes, will be a significant reduction of elephant killing for ivory.  

Seeking Digital Volunteers to Search & Protect Namibia’s Wildlife (Using Aerial Imagery from UAVs)

Patrick Meier is using UAVs, popularly called “drones”, to map out archaeological sites and aid humanitarian and environmental efforts. He partners with institutions around the globe to bring us amazing, interactive community projects and, of course, stunning aerial photos. New Update Here! UAVs are increasingly used in humanitarian response. We have thus added a new…

Hōkūle’a: Enjoying a Day Off

Getting days off is a rarity on the Worldwide Voyage. When we get the opportunity to plan an excursion, we try to make the most of it! This was how some crew members spent our day off after the UN Conference in Samoa.

So You Lost Your Drone Again?

This post is the latest in the Drones and Small Unmanned Aerial Systems Special Series,  which profiles interesting information, thoughts and research into using  drones, UAVs or remotely piloted vehicles for journalism and photography, that Kike learns about during his travels.  One of the most shocking experiences for a pilot of Small Unmanned Vehicles is to face a fly-away. Whatever the…